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The Brick Album

June 21, 2011 | Format: MP3

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$9.49 to buy
Also available in CD Format
Song Title
Time
Popularity Prime  
30
1
5:34
30
2
4:11
30
3
4:42
30
4
3:49
30
5
3:49
30
6
2:53
30
7
3:25
30
8
3:47
30
9
5:56
30
10
2:47
30
11
3:33
30
12
3:17
30
13
7:40
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Customer Reviews

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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
While, admittedly, Carol Young is the driving force for the song writing in this band, her shadow looms large on this album. I think that they played it a bit on the safe side this time and did't take as many creative chances as they did on earlier albums. I have seen them perform live and I have to say that I really love this band, both the earlier incarnation with Eamon playing fiddle as well as the latest assemblage after Eamon left. They have an amazing amount of energy and enthusiasm on stage is quite infectious, but I didn't get that sense from this album. Kim Warner is, without a doubt, one of a handful of really talented mandolin players that one can hear these days (with all due respect to Sam Bush, Chris Thile, Mike Marshall, Ricky Skaggs and a few others). I love bluegrass and acoustic music, but there are times when, on this album and their earlier efforts, some percussion would have really rounded out their sound.

Their "brick" concept of getting people to finance a portion of their recording with the promise of a plug on the cover or inside the jacket is novel and gave them a degree of independence from any record label's production and sound demands. Still, sometimes, to make a really professionally great album, you need that infrastructure. That is easy for me to say, not being a professional musician. Still, I know how much they love what they do and really cannot stand some record producer talking down to them, telling them what it is really going to take to produce a hit record.

I cannot give them a negative review, but I think the album has a bit too much of Carol's slow, dreamy tunes and could have used a little more upbeat compositions.
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Format: MP3 Music
Don't get me wrong. I am and continue to be a big Greencards fan. I've purchased all their records, seen them live, and friended them on Facebook. I've been waiting anxiously for this new record for some time.

But now, I'm disappointed. To these ears, it's not up to the melodic beauty of their other records. Just listen to the first three songs off Fascination, and try to find three similar classics on this one. On this whole record, the only song I felt was memorable was Here Lies John. The instrumental before that, Adelaide, was brilliant and could easily receive them their third Grammy nomination. But the other songs seemed more like fragments of partially conceived ideas that never really gelled. You can really tell what you are missing when the hidden track, the last song on the record, plays "Bury Me Beneath The Willow". It's a traditional classic bluegrass song, covered by many artists. This is songwriting, and unfortunately they recorded it using a tricky mono technique to sound old fashioned, so it doesn't sound great on nice headphones.

The positives...the Greencards are brilliant musicians and arrangers, and that still holds true. The sound is impeccable as usual, and Carol's singing is still superb...although I missed hearing a Kym song.

So there you have it. I just don't see most of these songs getting as much response live in concert as their older material, and don't think these will stand the test of time.
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Format: Audio CD
If you imagine an intersection where the traditions of country and bluegrass meet the inventions of newgrass and the changes that swept through British contemporary folk, you'll have a sense of the music spun by the Greencards. Their songs feature the tight harmonies of country and bluegrass, the sophistication of jazz, and the pluck of folk. As on 2009's Fascination, the band traverses numerous styles from song to song, but unlike the contrasting colors of their previous outing, here they explore varying shades of their progressive string-band sound. The opening "Make it Out West," though sung about modern contemporary emigration to the coast, still manages to conjure pickaxes and transcontinental rails with its rhythm. Similar changes are also heard in the jig "Adelaide," while the album's second instrumental, "Tale of Kangario," hints at South American styles.

Vocalist Carol Young moves fluidly from country to jazz to pop, occasionally transitioning within a single song. The bass and plucked mandolin of "Mrs. Madness" provides a `30s supper club setting for the verses, slides into contemporary harmonies on the chorus and adds modernly picked fills. The longing of "Faded" and harmony blend of "Naked on the River" lean more toward pop harmony groups like the Rescues than to traditional bluegrass or country, but the mandolin (courtesy of guest Sam Bush), fiddle (from recent addition Tyler Andal) and guitar (from the band's other recent addition, Carl Miner) keep the song anchored to the group's roots. Vince Gill adds a duet vocal on "Heart Fixer," and several dozen fans star as financial supporters, with their names emblazoned on the covers.
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Format: Audio CD
The Greencards have come a long way since their first offering, "Moving On", which was a relatively traditional bluegrass piece. It was very good and those that decideed to take a chance on a ,then, relatively unknown band were rewarded with a nice mix of originals and covers. Now, four recordings later, the Greencards have come into their own with a collection of songs that truly highlight their many talents. The songs are both inventive and captivating with Ms. Young weaving her beautiful voice seamlessly into the world class instrumentation. They borrow from traditional as well as contemporary songwriters but the heart of the album are the originals penned by Carol Young and Kym Warner. Supporting Warner, four time Austrailian mando champ, and Young on bass guitar who had two number one recordings on the Australian country music chart (and voted Best Female Vocalist) are two world class musicians, Carl Miner on guitar and Tyler Andal on fiddle. The sum of all this is a must-have CD for all who appreciate Americana music at its best.
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