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The Bridge Kindle Edition

285 customer reviews

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Length: 65 pages

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Editorial Reviews

Review

If you like chocolate, you'll know the feeling of tasting an exquisite chocolate that pleases every taste bud in your mouth and has you pining for more once the flavour fades... The Bridge is like that, only with words. It is balanced and well written and is a delight to the senses. There is something beautifully symbolic about it that will give readers different experiences to take away, and they will find themselves reflecting on the meanings and the intent of the author...or maybe it was just a good telling of a story. A good book club contender for readers to enjoy and discuss. Lea Owens, Amazon Reviewer 

It is a story of hope - where none existed or should have existed.
Love - and giving of the little you have to make another persons life worth living.
It is a picture of China - and the hopelessness for some, and the heart that still beats.
O. Scarlett! Reviews

From the Author

There are some moments in your life that stay with you forever. The boy in this story was a part of one of those times. If I close my eyes, I can still see the curve of his brown, rounded cheek and the flutter of his eye lashes with each emotion he felt. His chubby hands, wrapped around the rails of a child's bed, clutched tightly to protect himself from the unknown and dark world around him. I think that when I am old and gray, I will still think of this boy, and hope that somehow in some place, he found the family he needed and the peace he deserved.

Product Details

  • File Size: 4164 KB
  • Print Length: 65 pages
  • Publisher: Red Thread Publishing Group (November 5, 2011)
  • Publication Date: November 5, 2011
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services, Inc.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0064BYJN8
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Lending: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #77,054 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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More About the Author

Kay Bratt is a child advocate and author who lived in China for almost five years and fell in love enough with the people to want to write about them forever. If you would like to read more about what started her career as an author, and also meet the children she knew and loved in China, read her poignant and best selling memoir titled Silent Tears: A Journey of Hope in a Chinese Orphanage.

From Kay: To be notified when new books are released, please sign up for my monthly email newsletter at www.kaybratt.com or at this link: http://eepurl.com/q9_2X

The Tales of the Scavenger's Daughters now has four books! See below for what order to read them:

The Scavenger's Daughters
Tangled Vines
Bitter Winds
Red Skies


Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

35 of 38 people found the following review helpful By J.A.N. on November 17, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
What is most impressive about this short story is how it is "steady-good" from beginning to end.

Again Kay has taken an experience from her years of volunteer work in China's orphanage system and mixed fiction with reality to paint a picture of just one amongst the endless stream of abandon children in China.

This work is both sad, in that this young blind child is abandon by a historic bridge in China, and uplifting in that absolute strangers take extras steps to help this innocence child have the best life that can be patched out of a bad situation.

I hope that she does many more of these short stories as they are little "shots in the arm," when one needs a quick uplifting read.
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18 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Emily on November 16, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Kay has done it again! This is a short, easy read! It gives me hope that there are people like Jing in China (and all over the world) who can't turn their backs on little ones! I immediately fell in love with her and Fei Fei!
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Tiffany Lovering, Author on April 8, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
LimerenceMag.com Review

The Bridge, by Kay Bratt, is an inspiring short story set in modern day China. Fei Fei is a young boy who was abandoned on The Lucky Bridge by his mother because he is blind. The old woman, Jing, who lives opposite the bridge, has been bringing all of the children left there to the orphanage. When she takes Fei Fei in, she suddenly realizes just how much this little boy has touched her heart and is determined to help him however she can.

The writing is absolutely flawless and tells a heartwarming story. The author uses the Chinese language throughout the book which keeps you in the setting she's created. The characters are well developed in this short story and you can't help but fall in love with little Fei Fei.

Although I really liked this story, there was no conflict involved. Everything that happens is just too easy given the tragic situation. The ending was abrupt and left you wanting more, but not in a good kind of way. It felt like the real story was about to start where the author left off.

Overall, I would rate The Bridge 3 ½ stars and would recommend it for anyone interested in the Chinese culture who isn't expecting more than a light and fast read.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on January 29, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This short story tells the tale of an old woman and her compassionate role in helping those less fortunate than she. Although she lives in poverty, she sees to it that children, abandoned at the bridge in front of her home, get the help they need to (hopefully) become productive citizens. The story is fairly well written, poignant and makes a quick diversion with which to put a smile on your face during your busy day. I'm sure you will enjoy it!
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43 of 58 people found the following review helpful By Steve Koss VINE VOICE on August 25, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Given the overwhelming "5-star" sentiment for "The Bridge," this review is not easy to write, but I promise it is honest. As an American who has lived in and wandered the streets and shops of Suzhou on and off for ten years, I can say that Ms. Bratt's characterization of the locale is accurate as far as it goes, but it only goes the first ten feet of a hundred-mile journey. Her choice of Suzhou is potentially pregnant with cultural implications and a veritable treasure chest of sights and sounds, but to say that she only scratches the surface of this incredible city would already be an overstatement.

As for the writing? The plot is contrived and the ending is so obvious beyond words that there could be no spoilers the book itself doesn't already provide. The characters, especially the little boy, are relentlessly cloying, saintly enough to make Mother Theresa look like a thug. The writing is passably plain but the overall sentiment is almost unbearably treacly. For those whose literary tastes run to the kind of mawkish sentiment and intellectual depth found in Hallmark greeting cards, "The Bridge" will doubtless fill them with inspirational "good vibes." Readers who want something with depth, character development, and a representative sense of life in China are strongly advised to look elsewhere.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By kh on December 18, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition
As a mom of an adopted daughter from China I really enjoyed this story. It was difficult to imagine any mother felt leaving their child. I love how although there were many who passed by seemingly unaffected there were a pair of eyes closely watching!! A must read for all those involved or interested in Chana adoption! The ending is a surprise and a delight!
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11 of 14 people found the following review helpful By S.A.G. on November 15, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Kay Bratt has done it again! This fabulous short story tells what could be many adoptees' abandonment story. The warmth and understanding between the characters in this story will win you over in a few pages.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Mr. RAD on February 28, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
When love calls your name, what will you do? Will you ignore it, or will you answer?

Kay Bratt tells an interesting tale about an old woman who grows attached to a blind boy in need of care and how love can change people regardless of age. Stories like this demonstrate that compassion is not gone from the earth. It is still alive and well.

On a personal note, the young boy in this tale speaks to me. Though blind, he showed courage in facing life's challenges. That's a powerful message to someone like me who has lived in cowardice for two decades. If a child can be brave enough to live, then who am I to fear life? Who am I to fear adventure?

This is easily one of the best tale's I've read so far this year. I'm sure you'll agree when you try it.
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