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512 Reviews
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223 of 233 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars real Blu Ray review
I'm still not entirely sure why Amazon lumps the reviews for all versions of a given release in the same category. It makes it especially hard to locate reviews on the blu ray version. Anyway, this is a review of the blu ray version recently released, in a collector's format. It is composed of basically a digibook within a hard external case, which is quite flashy as it...
Published on November 3, 2010 by The Collector

versus
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Just Blu Ray
They used the same source film made originally for DVD. The Blu-ray version adds just a little. Definitely not worth buying if you already own the DVD.
Published 9 months ago by greatshot


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5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent story, August 27, 2013
More complex than you usually get today, with top notch performances. And it certainly showed the different honor systems between the American soldiers, the British, and the Japanese. Like three societies on different planets.
Most effectively it, it clearly demonstrated how war and honor like that lead to utter destruction and madness when pitted against each other. And themselves.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic!, August 27, 2013
I think I saw this movie at least 3x when I was a kid in the fifties....What really interested me was the leeches, the hotbox and Alec Guiness. This time around I loved the personalities and the positions the characters took under pressure such as opposition to the war, worried about being shamed, leadership and moral values as well as getting the job done under lots of pressure. Bravo!
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4.0 out of 5 stars Intense personal drama at the center of a world war, August 26, 2013
By 
Phil Berardelli (McLean, Virginia) - See all my reviews
The first of five widescreen epics directed by David Lean, this tense World War II drama takes place in Burma - although it was shot on the island of Ceylon (now Sri Lanka). Alec Guinness, in an Oscar-winning performance, stars as Colonel Nicholson, the senior British officer in a Japanese prison camp, whose authority is challenged by the commander, played by the fine, veteran Japanese actor Sessue Hayakawa. Detailed and authentic looking, the story is largely about the test of wills between the two enemy officers during the construction of a railroad bridge by the British prisoners. One of Lean's greatest movies, winning seven Oscars in all, including Best Picture, it features a nail-biting climax and strong supporting performances by William Holden and Jack Hawkins. Phil's Favorite 500: Loves of a Moviegoing Lifetime (2014 edition)
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5.0 out of 5 stars A gift for DAD., August 23, 2013
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This review is from: The Bridge on the River Kwai (DVD)
I have had this movie given to me a few years ago and my father asked to borrow it. I found a copy on Amazon and ordered it for him. He was very happy when it arrived. Now he can watch it whenever he wants.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Nice Blu Ray transfer., August 22, 2013
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This review is from: The Bridge on the River Kwai [Blu-ray] (Blu-ray)
This Blu Ray transfer was well done and brought out details that I had missed before. It is a famous movie so I can add little there but the Blu Ray version was worth my money.
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5.0 out of 5 stars The Moral Ambiguity of War in a Forgotten Land, August 19, 2013
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Stout fellow, Alec Guinness. His portrayal of Colonel Nicholson is unforgettable. Leading British soldiers into a Japanese prison camp in the middle of a jungle where escape seems utterly impossible, he sets out to do something incomprehensible, i.e. turn their defeat into victory. This he succeeds in doing, but at a terrible cost. After winning a life-and-death battle of wills with the Japanese commander, Colonel Saito (masterfully played by Sessue Hayakawa), Nicholson and his engineers create their crowning achievement: a bridge over the River Kwai. However, when the bridge is threatened by British commandoes, Colonel Nicholson is faced with a tragic dilemma. King and country momentarily forgotten, his first loyalty becomes to the bridge itself, sinking his own mind into madness, a dreadful tragedy of betrayal, and ultimate redemption. This is quite simply one of the finest films ever made, highly recommended to all viewing audiences.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Recomended!, August 19, 2013
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This review is from: The Bridge on the River Kwai [Blu-ray] (Blu-ray)
David Lean's (Director) hands are all over this war Picture coming from "Lawrence of Arabia" 7 Oscar win. Really thought out dialogue, builds this feature and you are there every step of the way through Alec Guinness unwavering personality; and the frustration he causes Colonel Saito (Sessue Hayakawa), who informs them that all prisoners, regardless of rank, are to work on the Bridge. Recommended.
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5.0 out of 5 stars An all time favorite, August 18, 2013
I remember fondly watching this with my father, a WWII veteran, many years ago. Once you hear the music, it stays with you for life.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A thrilling story that, a decade after the end of WWII, took liberties with the truth, August 17, 2013
The Bridge on the River Kwai deals with the ambiguous position in which Allied prisoners of the Japanese in Southeast Asia found themselves when ordered to help build a railroad from Bangkok to Rangoon that would supply the Japanese army in Burma as it prepared for an Allied counter-attack. The dilemma of Allied officers was heightened by the ignominious way the British Army had surrendered Singapore. The Japanese military code of bushido called on defeated officers to commit suicide rather than surrender hence they acted almost as though Allied officers were "non-persons."
The protagonist of the movie is the senior Allied officer (Alec Guinness) at a camp responsible for construction of a wooden bridge across a "River Kwai," a fusion of two Thai rivers: the Khwae Noi, a "rural" river that runs alongside stretches of the Burma Railway, and Khwae Yai, an "urban" river that flows past the City of Kanchanaburi. Just north of Kanchanaburi stands until this day a steel bridge, re-erected by the Japanese in 1943, and repaired by them after an Allied bombing attack. During the re-erection process, rail traffic passed over a temporary wooden bridge that was later demolished: the source of the bridge in the movie.
The construction of the railroad, including the bridges, by specialized Japanese army units is considered a great feat of engineering. Its completion greatly helped their war effort. The frequently cruel attitude of the Japanese engineers and their men towards the Allied prisoners mars their technical achievement.

The author artfully limits the action to a rural camp to highlight the interaction between the Japanese and Allied officers. In this isolated environment, the British senior officer convinces himself that the morale of his men is better served by collaborating with the Japanese. As the Japanese, contrary to history, begin to flounder, the Allied officers even take over the project. The completion of the bridge on time---that is to say, in order to prove most useful to the Japanese army in resisting the Allied counter-attack---becomes a matter of pride for the Allied troops, especially for the senior officer. He ignores its military purpose and fantasizes that, in years to come, future generations of civilians will applaud the bridge as his greatest accomplishment.
Taking advantage once again of the "move" to a rural setting, the author invents a commando team that will blow up the wooden bridge. The commandos have explosives in place the night before the bridge is to be inaugurated by the passage of an important convoy. As they await the arrival of the train to maximize the destructive impact, the senior Allied officer realizes the bridge has been mined and alerts the senior Japanese officer. In the resulting melee and shoot-out, the senior Allied officer eventually falls on the T-handle of the detonator and destroys "his own" bridge. Only at the last moment does he ask himself, "What have I done?" So, in the end, this is a moral tale about the sin of pride.
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5.0 out of 5 stars William Holden Classic, August 17, 2013
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This review is from: The Bridge on the River Kwai (DVD)
This movie will immerse you into the setting and drama unlike any other war saga that has a non-typical ending. If you can't feel it then you need some serious therapy.
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The Bridge on the River Kwai [Blu-ray]
The Bridge on the River Kwai [Blu-ray] by David Lean (Blu-ray - 2011)
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