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The Broken Ear (The Adventures of Tintin) Paperback – January 1, 1976


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Paperback, January 1, 1976
$5.35

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 64 pages
  • Publisher: Little, Brown & Co. (1976)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0416570305
  • ISBN-13: 978-0416570304
  • Product Dimensions: 11.4 x 8.4 x 0.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (26 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #5,526,662 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Hergé, one of the most famous Belgians in the world, was a comics writer and artist. The internationally successful Adventures of Tintin are his most well-known and beloved works. They have been translated into 38 different languages and have inspired such legends as Andy Warhol and Roy Lichtenstein. He wrote and illustrated for "The Adventures of Tintin" until his death in 1983.

Customer Reviews

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The illustration makes it very apparent that this is one of the earlier books.
Elizabeth
In the Tintin adventure "The Broken Ear", Belgian artist and storyteller Herge manages to work in a great many plot ideas.
D. S. Thurlow
I read it when I was a kid and still love the storyline and all the charactors.
Kindle Customer

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Elizabeth on August 21, 2000
Format: Paperback
This is not one of the better Tintin books. The illustration makes it very apparent that this is one of the earlier books. I find the story line to be rather choppy. This book was also penned before the introduction of Captain Haddock or Professor Calculus; even the Thompson Twins do not have much depth to them. It is noteworthy that General Alcazar makes his first appearance in this adventure. This book should be read before Herge's final Tintin adventure, Tintin and the Picaros, which in some senses is a continuation of The Broken Ear.
When a wooden statue is stolen from the museum, Tintin is intent on tracking it down. His pursuit takes him through South America, from the fictional country of San Theodoros (in which Herge satirizes the fickleness of a dictatorship) through the jungles of the Amazon. Murder and mayhem accompany him every step of the way.
Despite this book's lackings, it is a Tintin book, a fact which makes it a worthy read in of itself. For collectors, it is a must have. For Tintin enthusiasts, it is an enjoyable tale. For anyone unfamiliar with Tintin, I must stress that the other books are even better.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By darragh o'donoghue on April 30, 2002
Format: Paperback
After the artistic, technical and emotional peak of 'The Blue Lotus', Herge wisely decided to take things down a gear, rather than attempt to somehow out-marvel that seminal book. So 'The Broken Ear' is Tintin in a minor key - the undeviating single narrative is shorn of sub-plots; the spaces of South America, compared to the intricate detail of Japan and China in 'Lotus', are comparitively broad.
A fetish originating with the Arumbaya tribe is stolen from the Museum of Ethnology, and replaced with a fake. Tintin knows it's bogus because the original had a broken ear, and discovers that two Spanish crooks are also interested in finding the thief. Heroes and villains end up in the small South American principality of San Theodoros where Tintin is set up and put in front of a firing squad. Saved by coup and counter-coup, Tintin is made Colonel and right-hand man of dictator General Alcazar, among whose officers appear those same two thieves.
'Ear' is full of typical Herge incident, from the comic pursuit of a splendidly abusive parakeet, to a suspenseful downriver kayak-trip in search of a mysterious, hostile tribe. Herge's satiric sense shows how the political instabilities of many South American countries, with their seemingly daily military coups, are fanned by greedy European and American arms manufacturers and oil companies. The European plunder of other civilisations, so memorably a feature of previous adventures, is once again shown to be disastrous, even fatal. There are some wondrous visual conceits, in particular the Arumbaya rainforest sequence, which, set against an abstract, gren backdrop, frames its physical movements (fights, chases etc.) into a mysterious Matissean dance. The representation of landscape and settlements, with the eye on revealing detail, is as resonant as ever.
All this is fine, but one can't help feeling the lack of density, the rather perfunctory nature of the whole.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By babydoh on April 21, 2005
Format: Paperback
The Broken Ear (L'Oreille Cassée in the original French) is the sixth installment in the Adventures of Tintin series. It is also the first of the Tintin stories set in fictional Hispanic land San Theodoros, which (along with some of its natives) is to play a much greater role in later tales. The "broken ear" in the title refers to that of the Arumbaya Fetish, a small tribal statue whose theft from a museum is what begins the story.

In my mind, The Broken Ear is also the last Tintin story that is fully representative, in both its drawing style and plotline, of the early adventures. Looking at the art in The Broken Ear, one notices it bears a most striking resemblance to its immediate predecessors, notably The Blue Lotus and Cigars of the Pharaoh, whereas The Black Island - which immediately follows The Broken Ear - has a much greater similarity to the late adventures. Of course this is due to the subsequent revision (and revision and revision, in some cases) of those stories - but it's still curious to note.

To sum up, The Broken Ear has all the right ingredients: humor, suspense, intrigue, peril (and plenty of it!). To top it off, it features an ending in which the bad guys get what they deserve. Nothing could ever be lovelier.

(The "grrrrreat grrrrreedy-guts!" of the headline refers to a line often uttered in The Broken Ear by a parrot, who plays a crucial role in this story.)
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 6, 2003
Format: Hardcover
i was shocked to see the broken ear referred to as a "minor tintin" by one reviewer. i've read all the tintins atleast 50 times each over the last 20 years. in my opinion the broken ear is right at the top in the tintin canon! the mystery, the action, the adventure, the humour - it is simply superb. and this opinion is shared by a large number of my friends too. in the tintin canon the broken ear is rivaled only the blue lotus.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Ada Kerman on April 24, 2000
Format: Paperback
I've enjoyed the Adventures of Tintin series since I was a child. The combination of good art, interesting plots, and local detail which looked (to my untravelled eye) authentic, got and kept my attention through all 21 titles in the series.
In _The Broken Ear_, Tintin investigates the theft from a museum of a small statue with a broken ear. His investigations take him to South America, where the rain forest tribe that originally made the statue lives.
Unlike some of Tintin's adventures, which have fantastic or science fictional elements, this is a pure mystery / adventure comic which I highly recommend.
If you like the Adventures of Tintin, you may also enjoy the Asterix series, by Goscinny and Uderzo.
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