Trade in your item
Get a $2.00
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Brontes Paperback – January 1, 2007


See all 10 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback, January 1, 2007
$52.00 $11.00

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Choose Your Own Autobiography
Step right into Neil Patrick Harris's shoes in an exciting, interactive autobiography that places the reader squarely in the driver's seat. Learn more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 1024 pages
  • Publisher: Overlook Press; Reprint edition (2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1585673633
  • ISBN-13: 978-1585673636
  • Product Dimensions: 9.3 x 6.5 x 2.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.3 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,383,383 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

19 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Bruce Oksol VINE VOICE on April 16, 2007
Regardless of one's opinions about Juliet Barker's impression of Charlotte, and the rest of the Brontes, one can argue neither with the credibility of the author nor with her incredible research. The author has lived within a few miles of Haworth her entire life; was librarian and curator at the Bronte Parsonage Museum for six years; and researched this book for 11 years before publishing. The biography is 830 pages long, with an additional 150 pages of notes, and 30 pages of index. I would recommend this to those who are already well acquainted with the Brontes. It won't change your own personal myth of the Brontes, but it will shed light on trivia that might help explain background, names, and places in the various Bronte novels. For example, Charlotte's pseudonym, Currer Bell, now makes sense, though I disagree with Juliet's suggestion. This is much more than a biography; Juliet Barker includes the politics of the time, origins of modern Christian religious offshoots, the labor movement (the Luddites), and even the architecture (for example, the Late Perpendicular movement). Barker's description of the English landscape is wonderful, if a bit stilted. (When one is as emotionally linked with Yorkshire as I am, it's hard not be judgmental on descriptions of that wonderful place.) This book was meant to be read by the fire, on a cold and dark winter night, preferably in Haworth, with a soul mate who appreciates Yorkshire and all it has to offer.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
23 of 28 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 31, 1998
Barker is a meticulous scholar, and I enjoyed her notes as much as her main text. Her descriptions of the Bronte's home, village, and schooling were lively, engaging, and believable. The book educates, occasionally entertains, and sometimes annoys.
I knew nothing of any of the Brontes before I read the book: that's why, in fact, I read the book. Since we have more documentation about Charlotte, and some of Charlotte's comments aren't so nice, then Charlotte gets the brunt of Barker's judgement. Since we seem to know so little about what actually happened inside Anne's head, it is possible to canonize Anne, as Barker seems to do. We can make Anne what we want: she didn't tell us otherwise--the way Charlotte did. Why, for instance, did Barker expect Charlotte to "do" something for her brother, and yet Barker has no castigation for the other siblings? I'd hate to think of my personality being judged by the sometimes petty and selfish things I write in my own! journal; and I would like to extend the same indulgence to Charlotte.
On a positive note, though, I admire Barker's gutsiness for taking a position about Charlotte at all. I liked Barker's revisionist attitude toward the interpretation of all the Bronte's works. Perhaps Barker's devotion to *all* of the Bronte's work--not just Charlotte's--will bring more interest in Agnes Grey or the Tenant of Wildfell Hall. That would be fabulous.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Jennifer Cameron-Smith TOP 1000 REVIEWER on October 22, 2006
I first read this book in 1995. I only recently bought my own copy.

In this book, Juliet Barker provides a feast of information about the lives, times and writings of the Brontes. She is not the first to traverse this territory, but I believe that she does it more comprehensively than anyone else. The book itself is both a delight to read as well as a wonderful reference.

My only (slight) quibble is the greater focus on Charlotte. Perhaps this is inevitable: Charlotte did outlive her siblings, and published more novels.

I am biased. I have been a fan of the Brontes (especially Emily and Anne) for over 40 years.

Highly recommended to all Bronte fans.

Jennifer Cameron-Smith

Please note: this review was first published on July 28 2006
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Sarah Granger on September 15, 2004
That the Brontes were talented and have left an enduring legacy to the world of lituature is an unchallenged fact. That this book is the most exhaustive study of that family to date will probably also be undisputed. For anyone who has ever wanted to aquaint themselves with every cobblestone trod upon, every house lived in or visited, every sermon attended, every note written, every dress sewn - THIS is the book for you. In a book of 1000+ pages, the years in which the great Bronte lituature was produced is covered in a mere 125+ pages. Almost a footnote in a body of work of this size. Slightly less perhaps would have left us with much more
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By guido6@ix.netcom.com on September 23, 1997
Barker's expansive biography of the Bronte family opens up a new world of scholarship and shakes up many old and prevalent myths. Deeply researched and lovingly detailed, this book is a massive treasure trove of information that almost completely "reinvents" the Brontes, showing them not merely as pale, passive victims in an unhealthy atmosphere of renunciation and disease, but as determined and spirited people whose creativity burst from their souls and put its eternal stamp on the literary landscape. This book is a landmark of its kind, and thoroughly worthwhile.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 5, 1998
Barker's book is a celebration of minutia. She has presented us with a vast amount of it (which will be of use to someone, I'm sure) but doesn't provide a insightful interpretation into what it all means. (I realize that much of this is up to the "dear reader"; however, direction often helps when trying to interpret a life) The scathing criticism of the Bronte Society in her introduction forshadows the rather "school-marmish" tone she adopts within the text. I found it condesending and unecessary - anybody reading the book is going to know Bronte Basics, so no need for lecturing! The title suggests that the book will consider all of the Brontes, but unfortunately, it is an uneven study. The book comes dangerously close to becoming just another Charlotte Bronte bio. I closed the book knowing little more about Emily or Anne, and far too much about Patrick. Still, I'm sure it will be a valuable research tool for Bronte scholars who wish to explore how Patrick's cravat influenced the Bronte's work, and similar stuff.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?