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The Brothers Grimm: From Enchanted Forests to the Modern World Hardcover – January 17, 2003

ISBN-13: 978-1403960658 ISBN-10: 1403960658 Edition: 2nd

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 384 pages
  • Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan; 2nd edition (January 17, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1403960658
  • ISBN-13: 978-1403960658
  • Product Dimensions: 8.3 x 6.7 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,987,105 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

Zipes is probably the leading American authority on the fairy tale, which makes this new edition of his classic study of the Brothers Grimm (1988) especially welcome. Zipes has significantly revised and expanded his book, responding both to its earlier critics and to the wealth of new work on the Grimms to come out of East Germany since the fall of the Berlin Wall. He is concerned with both the artistry and the ideology of the tales. While agreeing that the Grimms often transformed their tales to reflect the bourgeois values of their world, Zipes wishes to avoid simplistic readings, exploring the complexity of what such values actually meant. At the same time, Zipes is interested in their later reception and appropriation, including the efforts of Disney. His new chapter on the legacy of the Grimms in East and West Germany is especially illuminating. Highly recommended.
T.L. Cooksey, Armstrong Atlantic State Univ., Savannah, GA
Copyright 2002 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

Review

"Jack Zipes knows the world of the Grimms better than anyone, and his provocative and illuminating book has already made waves in the folklore and children's literature worlds in its earlier incarnation." -- Jane Yolen, author of Touch Magic

"Jack Zipes does a marvelous job of digging out the way the stories were set up." -- The Boston Globe

"Zipes' eloquent and persuasive scholarship is enough to recommend The Brothers Grimm, but it is his witty and trenchant readings of the tales that will delight even the most hardened anti-Grimm reader." -- The Globe and Mail

"...this new edition of his classic study of the Brothers Grimm (1988) [is] especially welcome." -- Library Journal

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By FSS on May 6, 2008
Format: Paperback
Zipes, Jack. 2002. The Brothers Grimm: From Enchanted Forests to the Modern World. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

The first edition of Jack Zipes' The Brothers Grimm: From Enchanted Forests to the Modern World was published in 1988. So, this particular book is the second, revised version of its kind. Zipes wished to write this book to address more information that has become available about the lives of the Grimm brothers since his last edition. He describes his inspiration with the following statement. "Their hope for themselves and their people in the once upon a time of their fairy tales is the hope that has inspired my own work, and despite the critical and skeptical attitude I maintain in studying their work and legacy, it is their fairy-tale hope that keeps me going" (p. xvi).

Zipes begins the book with a reintroduction of The Brothers Grimm. He writes of the early "idyllic" life of the Grimm family. Their father was a successful lawyer and their mother was a devoted housewife. Life was going well for the family of 6 children up until the death of their father. After that, they depended heavily on the graciousness of their grandfather and other relatives, especially their Aunt Henriette, whom Zikes compares to a "good fairy". Jacob and Wilhelm, the oldest male children, were expected to become successful and take care of and retain the good name of the Grimm family. Jacob was the eldest, very bright, and was much like their father. Wilhelm was very bright also, but more prone to ill health. Jacob and Wilhelm did go on to excel in school. Jacob had planned to become a lawyer like his father, but instead he felt obligated to care for his mother and 5 younger siblings. So, he left behind the study of law and secured a job.
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19 of 25 people found the following review helpful By T. Hooper on March 7, 2006
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book tries to cover a lot of ground, but in the end you get a sense that it has gotten you anywhere. The first impression I got was that this book was actually a bunch of journal articles thrown together because there isn't much sense of continuity to this book. It doesn't have an overall theme and the topics covered don't seem to connect well. It starts off with a short biography of the Grimms, so far so good. After that, it covers the orgins of the tales, a little dry, but not bad. After that, there's a chapter about how the Grimm tales indoctrinate children into the bourgeoisie. The Marxism seems a little dated. After that, out of the blue, you get a chapter on Henri Pourrault, an obscure writer of fairy tales. It's never explained why this writer is in this book, but I guess the author really liked this journal article and couldn't resist throwing it in.

After this, it gets really weird. You get a chapter about how fairy tales are all about childhood sexual abuse. If that doesn't kill your mood to read fairy tales, then the following chapter in which the author attacks the Grimm tales as outdated and obsolete and advocates the rewriting of the tales for more modern perspectives will. One gem that the author singles out for praise is a rewriting of Cinderella. In this version, Cinderella is a labor organizer who organizes all the workers in her kingdom. The prince, impressed by her accomplishments, falls in lover with her and proposes. However, Cinderella refuses to betray the worker and rejects the prince. In the end, Cinderella moves to America and the prince commits suicide over the heartbreak. Wow, the kids will love that one. It's not even entertaining or enlightening for adults and borders on masochistic. That's some of the nonsense that you'll run into in this book. I really recommend that you pass on this.
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Midwest Book Review on January 11, 2003
Format: Paperback
The Brothers Grimm: From Enchanted Forests To The Modern World by Jack Zipes (Professor of German, University of Minnesota) is an informed and informative examination of the lives of the famous fairy tale gatherers, writers, and preservers, Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm. From their humble origins amidst poverty and prejudice to their ultimate contribution to literature as a whole, The Brothers Grimm is a truly fascinating account and a "must-read" for serious students of European fantasy literature and folklore.
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Hestheone on February 23, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Well, I must say that this book is not at all like the particularly dreadful movie directed by Terry Gilliam and staring Matt Damon and Heath Ledger. The book is actually a rather useful scholarly work telling you all you might want to know about the Grimm guys. The movie...well, I don't know what it was trying to do.
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