The Business of Baby and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy New
$19.30
Qty:1
  • List Price: $27.00
  • Save: $7.70 (29%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 17 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
The Business of Baby: Wha... has been added to your Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

The Business of Baby: What Doctors Don't Tell You, What Corporations Try to Sell You, and How to Put Your Pregnancy, Childbirth, and Baby Before Their Bottom Line Hardcover – April 16, 2013


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$19.30
$4.50 $4.45
100%20Children%27s%20Books%20to%20Read%20in%20a%20Lifetime
$19.30 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Only 17 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.


Frequently Bought Together

The Business of Baby: What Doctors Don't Tell You, What Corporations Try to Sell You, and How to Put Your Pregnancy, Childbirth, and Baby Before Their Bottom Line + Ina May's Guide to Childbirth
Price for both: $32.02

Buy the selected items together
  • Ina May's Guide to Childbirth $12.72

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 368 pages
  • Publisher: Scribner (April 16, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1451636083
  • ISBN-13: 978-1451636086
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.3 x 1.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (102 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #173,850 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

Readers who are skeptical about mainstream medicine will love this book. Margulis, a journalist with a PhD in English and four children, begins her story with some scary-sounding facts: Every year more than 700 U.S. women die in childbirth, more than 25,000 of 4.3 million U.S. babies born each year will die before they turn one, and eight out of 1,000 U.S. infants will not live to age five. Margulis raises many valid questions: Why do more than 1.4 million U.S. women each year give birth via cesarean section? Why do U.S. dads often get no time off from work after the birth of a baby when fathers in Norway get 12 weeks of parental leave at full pay? She also asks whether doctors make too many of their decisions based on the profit motive. Unfortunately, she may unnecessarily alarm some pregnant moms about everything from vaccines (she particularly dislikes giving the hepatitis B immunizationto newborns) to ultrasounds (she cites a hypothesis that they may trigger autism). It’s not a balanced book, but it is a thought-provoking one that will motivate women to ask why before blindly agreeing to everything their doctor orders. --Karen Springen

Review

“Pregnancy and childbirth are wildly vulnerable times, and one is desperate to put one's faith in the doctor. Jennifer Margulis reveals why that trust is sometimes misplaced, and helps us to make wise choices when the stakes are high. This is a must-read book for parents and parents-to-be,and for the medical professionals who care for us.” (Harriet Lerner, Ph.D. author of The Dance of Anger and Marriage Rules)

"A new mother's first instinct is to protect her newborn. But how can she best do that in a consumer culture so focused on its bottom line? The Business of Baby exposes some hard and shocking facts about how even the most well-meaning American parents unwittingly buy into systems that do documented harm. Thought-provoking and exhaustively researched, this book is destined to inspire much-needed dialogue about the current American way of birthing and caring for our young." (Hope Edelman bestselling author of Motherless Daughters)

“Jennifer Margulis's searing and well-researched exposé is a must-read for expectant mothers. Whether she is discussing common obstetric practices, circumcision, vaccination, breastfeeding, bottlefeeding, diapering, or choosing a pediatrician, she points the way to rational, health-based decision-making.” (Ina May Gaskin)

“Worthyof close consideration by parents.” (Kirkus)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

She is not pulling facts and information out of the air, this is a very well researched book.
dreaming of the sun
If you like conspiracy theories based on authors personal opinion instead of evidence based practice then this book is for you.
Jeff
I'm really concerned about women reading this book who just take it all in without any critical thinking.
SJH

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

401 of 547 people found the following review helpful By Alexis Coxon VINE VOICE on May 14, 2013
Format: Hardcover
There is a great need for an incisive look at all sides of modern maternity care in the United States, because -- let's face it -- we all know it's not perfect. This, however, is not that book.

While Margulis' book is touted as "an eye-opening work of investigative journalism" and based on "meticulous research," the fact is, it's just another book advocating natural childbirth and demonizing doctors and hospitals. If that's what you're looking for, have at it, but don't read this expecting an objective look of any sort. Margulis was the subject of several stories about her unattended childbirth (with no midwife or OB present), which already puts her at the fringe of the natural birth movement. Her husband, James Di Properzio, is on the Oregon Board of Direct Entry Midwifery.

Among disturbing and/or bizarre things I noted, just in the first chapter:

* Margulis lists "scary-sounding" ingredients in prenatal vitamins, then fails to actually investigate whether or not they're safe. One, for example, is sodium benzoate -- a very widely used food preservative.

* In a list of facts and figures, Margulis adds up the cost of a nine-month supply of prenatal vitamins and then compares it to the cost of ONE bunch of kale. (Does it follow that one bunch of kale will provide all needed nutrition for nine months? Because one nutrition database I checked shows one cup of kale provides a mere 5 percent of the RDA for folate.)

* Margulis calls the glucose test (basically, drinking an overly sweet beverage and then getting your blood drawn) "one of the most unpleasant prenatal tests." Really? I mean, if that's her view of a syrupy drink, stubbing her toe must seem positively apocalyptic.
Read more ›
36 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I cried when I read Jennifer Margulis’ book, “The Business of Baby: What Doctors Don’t Tell You, What Corporations Try to Sell You, and How to Put Your Pregnancy, Childbirth and Baby Before Their Bottom Line“. I wish it had been around and I had read it 9-1/2 years ago when I was pregnant with my first son.

This book made me wish that I could have a mulligan for having my sons. Perhaps my older son wouldn’t have gone into fetal distress during my labor with him after the doctor broke my water. Perhaps he wouldn’t have had meconium in his lungs and had an APGAR of 5/9. Perhaps I wouldn’t have almost had an emergency C-section. Perhaps he wouldn’t have had so many of the health issues that I’ve recovered him from, most notably Sensory Processing Disorder, and other problems like severe developmental delays.

When I was on the way to becoming a new parent, I was like most people out there, who assume that doctors and the healthcare system are looking out for us and have our best interests at heart.

Jennifer (Dr. Margulis, PhD) shows us how this just isn’t so. She shows us how pharmaceutical companies and medical-insurance companies are not only shaping for the worse what our healthcare choices are but also how there is a revolving door between them and federal government that drives federal healthcare policy.

You and I are looked at as long-term profit centers by the healthcare industry. Food and prevention don’t make a lot of profit, so they’re ignored. I love Jennifer’s quote, “You won’t see a farmer going to a doctor’s office with free kale in the hopes of getting pregnant patients hooked”.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 13 people found the following review helpful By J. Steven Svoboda on November 23, 2013
Format: Hardcover
Award-winning journalist Jennifer Margulis, who is also the mother of four children, has written a book that has much to say about the interface of capitalism and our deeply flawed medical system with pregnancy, childbirth, and raising a baby. Surely The Business of Baby, which was famously panned by the New York Times, is not a perfect book. Margulis seems less than a perfectly judicious and objective author, probably likely to favor anything alternative and a sure bet to find fault with most anything that is sold by big corporations that relating to pregnancy or raising a young child.

That is just fine by me. While I was initially skeptical, this book eventually converted me to a view more or less aligned with that of the author. Margulis is an excellent writer, opening her book with two compellingly contrasting stories of prospective mothers, 1) a Serbian-born woman, Marijana, living in London who upon becoming pregnant for the first time, moves back home with her husband; and 2) a New Jersey elementary school teacher, Melissa Farah, having her first child at the same hospital as a close girlfriend, Valerie Scythes, who became pregnant at more or less the same time. The author’s trenchant question: “Which young woman would be better off, the one in a small Balkan country still recovering from a brutal civil war, or the mom in the richest and most powerful country in the world with state-of-the-art medical equipment and know-how?” The answer of course, is that statistically, Marijana is better off, and in fact, both Melissa and Valerie died in childbirth.

In terms of infant mortality, no fewer than forty-eight (!) countries are safer than the United States, which has one of the highest death rates in the industrialized world.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?