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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Guinevere included .....
A long time reader of Elizabeth Peter's Amelia Peabody series, I found The Camelot Caper to be a good change of pace. As a trained archeologist, Peters's books are always a good combination of realisitic history and imaginative mystery.
In The Camelot Caper, young American Jessica Tregarth is summoned to England by an elderly grandfather whom she has never met. On...
Published on June 3, 2002 by Jan McGreger

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35 of 38 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good story, but kind of disappointing
Since this book was written in the late 1960's, I guess the heroine was still in the process of becoming the strong female character typical of Peter's work. This book disappointed me and I couldn't stand the passive heroine at times. In fact, once I set the book down in disgust at her behavior, although that may seem...
Published on May 17, 1999


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35 of 38 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good story, but kind of disappointing, May 17, 1999
By A Customer
Since this book was written in the late 1960's, I guess the heroine was still in the process of becoming the strong female character typical of Peter's work. This book disappointed me and I couldn't stand the passive heroine at times. In fact, once I set the book down in disgust at her behavior, although that may seem like an overreaction to some people. It seemed like she was always submitting to the "hero." Aaargh! However, for those of you that aren't as sensitive about these issues as I am, it's a great, funny tale to curl up in front of the fireplace with. It's also a tie-in with one of Peter's other series, the Vicky Bliss mysteries (which I love), giving some background to the elusive "Sir John's" origins.
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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Guinevere included ....., June 3, 2002
By 
Jan McGreger "janmcalex" (Humboldt, TN United States) - See all my reviews
A long time reader of Elizabeth Peter's Amelia Peabody series, I found The Camelot Caper to be a good change of pace. As a trained archeologist, Peters's books are always a good combination of realisitic history and imaginative mystery.
In The Camelot Caper, young American Jessica Tregarth is summoned to England by an elderly grandfather whom she has never met. On the outs with her father and his son, Grandpa has to wait while Jess dodges two unsavory characters who harass and threaten her across jolly old England. Along the way she meets David Randall, a young writer of suspense novels, who helps Jess in sorting out the whys and wherefores of the chase and manages to fall in love with her, too.
The chase was something of a drag, but the moment they pull up in front of the old family homeplace in Cornwall, the excitement escalates. A dreary, decrepit old manor house, complete with a now deceased Grandpa, sets an excellent scene for the unmasking of the two unsavory characters and the explanation for the cross-country stalking.
As with any book written decades ago, the time warp issue becomes a factor. It was rather enjoyable to try to picture the clothing the characters were described as wearing. All in all, this is a solid, interesting suspense novel. An enjoyable read!
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16 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars M. Green, NY. A rating number is N/A to this review., March 29, 1998
By A Customer
Elizabeth Peters' adventure novels are amusing, intelligent, and marvelously successful at spoofing their genre while providing all the pleasures of the real thing. In her recent novels particularly Ms. Peters has taken the classic Mary Stewart-style adventure/romance and turned it into witty, literate pieces of fluff that even a 1990's romantic can wholeheartedly enjoy. No one, on reading the perfectly balanced immodesty (in all senses of the word) of Ms. Peters' latest heroes and heroines, need feel that they are subverting their feminist ideals, or feel obliged to adopt the resolute blinkers needed to enjoy the charming but socially distressing romances of , say, Georgette Heyer (whose unspoken assumptions about class, gender and race would, if met face-on, deeply offend just about any American today).
The Camelot Caper was one of Ms. Peters earlier ventures, and while it is picture-perfect with its spoof it hadn't, in the late 1960's, quite broken through a certain passive cast to the heroine that was once endemic to these sorts of stories. It did, however, introduce a highly amusing, rather attractive villain whose name will evoke whoops of delight from fans of the superb art historian-turned-amateur-detective series most recently embodied in Ms. Peters' Night Train to Memphis. For that alone (though there is also some very funny dialogue), this book is definitely worth a first or a return read.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Buy This Book!!!!, February 18, 1999
Elizabeth Peters shows once again that she is the best in mystery writing. Her characters are compelling and she always makes you laugh. In addition, you will fall in love with her heros and see yourself in her heroines! She also writes under the name Barbara Michaels. (Her real name is Barbara Mertz.) Under any name, she is one of my all time favorite writers!
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A Good Walk Down Memory Lane, August 5, 2006
I first read this book almost 30 years ago. It was the first Elizabeth Peters book that I had read. It made a big impression on me at the time, and I thought it was wonderful, to the point of going back several times to the library to check it out. Some lines stayed with me over the years... "when she blows, a typhoon; when she bleeds, the red sea"; and, the line about being a "Tolkien illiterate". Now, in re-reading the book, I find that it is not one of Ms. Peters' best. I did find, however, that I understood the Arthurian references much more clearly. I am glad to finally have been given a chance to read it again, and to have been able to add it to my collection.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Full of Thrills, September 3, 2001
Jessica Tregarth is unwillingly towed into a mystery when two sinister and mysterious men follow her throughout England on her vacation to her grandfather's house. For unknown reasons the men say that they want an ancient ring Jessica processes, and Jessica confused, refuses to give in. She meets up with David Randall, a novelist, who decides to take her under his wing as they set out to solve the mystery of the ring, her grandfather's strange conviction that the remains of Camelot lie on his property, and the motives of the two villains that pursue her. With all it's action and adventure this book is definitely hard to put down. The reader is thrown into the mystery and adventure from the book's very beginning. Elizabeth Peters does a terrific job of creating the character of David. He's wit, charm, and daring all woven into one. The romance and Peter's blended in sense of humor are a refreshing bonus throughout "The Camelot Caper".
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars LOL, December 31, 2005
No masterpiece, The Camelot Caper is a fun, light read that actually made me laugh aloud, humorously, not derisively, in some places. Written in the late 60's, it certainly does not reflect the changing morals of the "sexual revolution", being somewhat coy and prim on the topic of the romance between Jess and David. This book seems to poke fun at the way many people take the mythology of King Arthur very seriously. Basically, the plot is much ado about nothing, but Peters manages to sustain the reader's curiosity about why all those strange things are happening to poor, naive Jess. I found Camelot Caper refreshing, light and amusing.
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Non-stop fun, but..., May 17, 2004
By A Customer
I have to put my two-cents in on the question of the heroine's qualities. I happened to read this book at the same time as Mary Stewart's "The Gabriel Hounds" (both books written in the late 60's) and I found the heroines curiously similar. There can be no doubt about their courage, but they both appeared to be somewhat mentally deficient in comparison with their male counterparts. In both books, the boyfriends seem to figure things out on their own and withhold the information from the girlfriends, who only slowly and painfully begin to understand what's going on.
The technique tends to keep the reader in a bit more suspense, but, as a male reader with a lot of experience in reading suspense stories with female protagonists, I found myself rather irritated that the heroines both seemed to be so dim-witted.
Given a heroine who made more of a contribution to the solution of the mystery, this book would easily have been at least four stars for me.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great fun, and a glimpse at a young Sir John Smythe, September 1, 2010
By 
Rachel Gray "Reg" (San Francisco, CA United States) - See all my reviews
This is a good standalone quasi-gothic novel from the excellent Elizabeth Peters, with a clever and sympathetic heroine, an interesting mystery, a love interest, and some bad guys--if you choose to see it that way. It could also be seen as the first story that involves a certain Mr. John Tregarth (who may in later books appear with an assumed title and a different surname...), and since I heard that Peters' original title of the book was Her Cousin John (and since I love the Vicky and John books to a ridiculous degree), I choose that. As such, it's also a good quasi-gothic novel, with all those same good things, but it's not exactly standalone.

Either way it's good, and as eminently and pleasurably readable and fun as any Elizabeth Peters book.
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9 of 12 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars I don't believe it--an Elizabeth Peters book I didn't like!, March 20, 2005
Elizabeth Peters is one of my top 5 favorite authors ever. However, this book is really bad. I couldn't even finish it, and I really hate to stop in the middle of a book. If you haven't read this yet, don't; read _The Crocodile on the Sandbank_ instead. If you've already read this, please don't judge Ms Peters by this work. I urge you to give her another shot, because _The Camelot Caper_ is well below the quality of her other books.
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