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The Canon of Scripture Hardcover – October 31, 1988


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 349 pages
  • Publisher: IVP Academic (October 31, 1988)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 083081258X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0830812585
  • Product Dimensions: 9.5 x 6.3 x 1.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (55 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #32,298 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

F. F. Bruce (1910-1990) was Rylands Professor of Biblical Criticism and Exegesis at the University of Manchester in England. During his distinguished career, he wrote more than forty bestselling commentaries and books, including several titles published by InterVarsity Press, A Mind for What Matters and Paul, Apostle of the Heart Set Free. He also served as general editor of The New International Commentary on the New Testament.

More About the Author

F. F. Bruce (1910-1990) was Rylands Professor of Biblical Criticism and Exegesis at the University of Manchester in England. During his distinguished career, he wrote more than forty bestselling commentaries and books, including several titles published by InterVarsity Press, A Mind for What Matters and Paul, Apostle of the Heart Set Free. He also served as general editor of The New International Commentary on the New Testament.

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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Great book very good read about history of the scriptures. recommend every one to read who is interested in learning.
stan robertson
That said, this work is superior to a simple reference book, as Bruce provides a great deal of detail and appeals to a number of primary and secondary sources.
pb
The book makes clear that the disagreements between the church and various heretical movements led to a discussion of what should be included in the canon.
Tim R. Dolan

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

121 of 125 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Marc Axelrod VINE VOICE on January 6, 2002
Format: Hardcover
FF Bruce does a great job of explaining how the books of the Bible were canonized. I was surprised to learn how many people had different opinions on which books should be canonized. Many people had mized feelings about the book of Revelation because of it being a difficult book to understand. Others felt that James should not be included because it only mentions the name of Jesus twice. Similarly, the books of esther and Song of Songs in the Old Testament barely made it in.
And right up to the present day, there are those who feel that the Apocrypha should be included in the canon of Scripture, and the Roman Catholic church regards them as such today.
Bruce takes the time to discuss individual theologians such as Jerome, Origen, Tertullian, Augustine, Clement of Alexandria, Irenaeus, Athanasius, and many others and whenever possible, he furnishes their choices for books whoch were deemed fit for the canon of Scripture. Apparently, Athansius' trip to Rome in 350 AD was decisive for helping the western church decide on the 27 books of the New Testament that we now have today. Before this, they were hedging on Hebrews, 1 Peter, 2 Peter, Revelation, James and 2 and 3 John.
The book concludes with a couple of the author's lectures on the subect of the secret gospel of Mark (which he rejects) and the difference between the plenary meaning of scripture and the meaning in context.
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44 of 45 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 20, 2001
Format: Hardcover
This is the best single text that I've read dealing with the manner in which the Bible took its shape. So many Christians have the impression that our Bible floated down from the clouds. This book will open the eyes of many--the New Testament Canon wasn't firmly decided upon until nearly three hundred years after the death of Christ (!). This is an excellent piece of scholarship, doctrine, and church history. Not only will readers learn about the Bible, they will also learn about some great theologians of the early Church. A must read for Roman Catholics, Orthodox, Anglicans, Evangelicals and everyone else who wants to understand the Bible and the ancient Christian Church. Inter Varsity Press publishes this book: I've been very impressed by many of the scholarly books they have recently published on doctrine (several books by N.T. Wright) and the ancient catholic Church Fathers (Ancient Christian Commentary on the Scriptures series).
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47 of 49 people found the following review helpful By Byron Upchurch on November 9, 1999
Format: Hardcover
Dr. Bruce's monograph addresses both the Hebrew and Christian canon of Scripture, spanning from Moses through the Late Middle Ages. In the final chapters, he briefly addresses some modern issues, notably those regarding original texts used for translations. Readers without a basic understanding of the History of Christianity might find most of the concepts too difficult to grasp without additional study. While targeted to specialists in the field, I would recommend the work to any serious student of Bible History.
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28 of 29 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer VINE VOICE on June 29, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Helpful, in-depth discussion of the issues surrounding the collection of the Old and New Testament canon.
Technical note: He uses topic sentences (much easier to follow his reasoning with this method). This book uses footnotes instead of endnotes for easier reference. His documentation is amazingly broad (he does not pull from exclusively contemporary opinion, but source documents).
He explains not only OT and NT canon, but also the criteria for canon inclusion. He is lucid. This book is clear and the progression is easy to follow.
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35 of 38 people found the following review helpful By Kathy F. Cannata on August 10, 2005
Format: Hardcover
Until his untimely death about 15 years ago, Bruce was the leading English-speaking authority on textual criticism. His only serious competitor for this position was Bruce Metzger (who the mainliners preferred due to his less evangelical theological commitments and affiliation with the more liberal Princeton Seminary). But Metzger (whose own book on the canon of Scripture is the standard in mainline circles) acknowledged in a review of Bruce in the Princeton Seminary Bulletin that Bruce's work was superior to his own. He pointed out his reasons for this in detail.

Given the bizarre conspiracy theories and claims of Dan Brown and teh da Vinci Code crowd, Bruce's book is even more relevant than when it was written. I own two copies and bought another for our church library. Get Metzger's book also.
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68 of 82 people found the following review helpful By Didaskalex VINE VOICE on October 12, 2002
Format: Hardcover
The Canon of Scripture:
The dean of evangelical biblical scholars did a great service when he decided to get this work out of his system (Preface), since he made a very successful attempt indeed to communicate the state of knowledge on this tricky and sensitive subject. This book stands my Criterion: If I only have one book on the subject, I would buy this book. This book is methodical, written basically for Seminarians, still tickles your curious bone, but don't get tricked by the smoothness of his elaboration, being a top exegesist and a reference on biblical criticism.
Preface & Chapter one:
Read the condensed preface attentively, it highlights Prof. Bruce intended strategy to leave the more controversial issues on the OT canon to R. Beckwith and J. Barton. The short chapter defines terms that became the vocabulary of the subject, their meaning and roots. 'People of the Book' conveys his cultural standing, but he avoids elaborating on the concept of the two testaments but will not but mention Jeremiah 31:31, and later how Origen was the first to use and propagate this Alexandrine terminology (p. 192 : on First Principles 4.1.1)

TaNaKh & Wider Canon:
Bruce, who said will shy from OT canon, masterfully instructs us in his own way, starting from the authority of OT for a Christian: Jesus appeal to TaNaKh, going from the threefold division to the closing of the Hebrew canon in Jabneh. Now, with a firm foot, he delves into the Alexandrine wider Canon starting with Septuagint origin, order of books, and adoption as Ancient Churches OT, and NT evidence, but does not state citations or allusions to the Apocrypha (K. & B. Aland: The text of the NT, Eerdmans, 1979) that he mentions (p.
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