Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Captain's Honor (Star Trek: The Next Generation, No. 8) Mass Market Paperback – May 1, 1991

7 customer reviews

See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$0.96
Mass Market Paperback
"Please retry"
$2.18 $0.01
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
$9.29

Best Books of the Month
See the Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Series: Star Trek: The Next Generation (Book 8)
  • Mass Market Paperback: 255 pages
  • Publisher: Pocket Books (May 1, 1991)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0671741403
  • ISBN-13: 978-0671741402
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 4.2 x 6.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,055,241 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By michael a thomas sr. on May 21, 2013
Format: Mass Market Paperback
If America went from a horse-and-buggy agrarian society to the moon itself in less than one hundred years, it is absolutely plausible that, once the 'Romans' knew that other humans existed in the universe, they would do everything in their power to catch up with their visitors, because no Roman would be able to stand the thought that they weren't the absolute center of the universe. Why is it implausible that it would take eighty years to make the leap? Advances in technology tend to work on a geometric basis, one discovery leads to ten that leads to a thousand.

Start with the twentieth century technology that they already had available, mix in a sure knowledge that others had succeeded at the goal that they'd set for themselves, and cover it all with the absolute belief that they were the best in the universe at everything they did, and you could easily have warp-speed space travel, and the advances in political realities that would allow for membership in the Federation of Planets, in less than eighty years.

This book is a study in philosophical differences and what those differences might lead to when the feces hit the oscillator. If you want *BangBang*, *PewPewPew*, then go elsewhere. If you want to think a little, and maybe slip outside the traditional mindset that all of Starfleet is made up of perfect little human robots, then slow down and enjoy this wonderful time capsule from the late Eighties.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By James Yanni on December 21, 2001
Format: Mass Market Paperback
There isn't really much action in this book; it's mostly hinted at rather than actually described. This is understandable, as the book is intended to be more of a look at the philosophy of the Federation and Starfleet, rather than an action-adventure story. I found the characterizations intriguing, particularly that of the characters original to this book; mostly (with the exception of Worf and to a lesser extent, Picard) the established characters are background filler. But I found the basic concept of the Magna Romans (from Original series "Bread and Circuses") having advanced far enough in 80 years to have joined the Federation and been entrusted with a Starship of their own more than a bit dubious; I doubt that either the Federation or Starfleet would be that foolish. Further, I found it disappointing that the people who were too pacifistic to defend themselves (but not too pacifistic to ask for help so that somebody ELSE could defend them) were never actually forced to face the consequences of their actions; further, those who were unwilling to allow them the luxury of that hypocrisy were portrayed as villains. Granted, changing their culture without permission was villainous, but it would not have been out of line for Picard (or Sejanus) to refuse to help those who would not attempt to help themselves.
Clearly, the authors intend to bring Sejanus back in some future story. For all I know, they may have already done so; if they have, I've not read it yet.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 6 people found the following review helpful By K. Wyatt on July 19, 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
As homage to Star Trek The Original Series episode "Bread and Circuses," "The Captain's Honor" authors bring characters from that fateful planet forward into the twenty fourth century. In concept, the premise to this story is an ideal concept, in practice though; it's not carried forward very well. Given the conclusion of that TOS episode, one would find it difficult to believe that the culture of that planet would've advanced enough that in the twenty fourth century they'd be given a starship to command and crew for even in Science Fiction and especially in Gene Roddenberry's universe, the suspension of disbelief must be plausible, but that is hardly accomplished in this early Star Trek The Next Generation novel. That is not to say that this novel is not worth reading because I believe all of the Star Trek novels are worth reading, this one just doesn't stack up too well with the rest.
The premise:
The planet Tenara is being has been attacked several times by M'Dok Empire causing Starfleet to call in the Enterprise and another Federation starship, the Centurion. As a point of conflict, Captain Picard feels that negotiation must be the first strategy they use but Captain Sejanus of the Centurion feels that they must take a harder stance against the M'Dok. All the while, the people of Tenara who are suffering these attacks must choose the path that must be taken to attempt to end these attacks...
While not too heavy on the action, this novel does present a thought provoking, if not plausible, set of circumstances within the Federation and should be taken for what it is, an early STNG novel that was written when the show was very young and the overall feel of the characters and the series hadn't quite gelled yet. {ssintrepid}
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Siskoid on April 12, 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
The return of the Romans from "Bread and Circuses" is unexpected and appreciated, though the use of a Constitution-class vessel is anachronistic, in my opinion. The plot with the cat-like aliens is secondary to the real thrust of the novel: that cultural differences spawn different ways of doing things. The dress of the ship, the holodeck sequences, what foods the Neo-Romans eat, and, most of all, their attempts to assimilate a culture into their own, are NOT Federation standard... but they do make sense in the Roman ethos. An excellent contrast with everything Star Trek has shown us before. Hail Ceasar!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again