The Captains 2011 NR

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(167) IMDb 7/10
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Since first soaring onto television screens in the mid 1960s, Star Trek has become one of the most beloved franchises of all time. The original Captain Kirk, William Shatner, travels around the globe to interview the elite group of actors (Patrick Stewart, Chris Pine, Scott Bakula, Avery Brooks and more) who have portrayed the role of Enterprise Captain.

Starring:
William Shatner, Patrick Stewart
Runtime:
1 hour 37 minutes

Available to watch on supported devices.

The Captains

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Product Details

Genres Documentary
Director William Shatner
Starring William Shatner, Patrick Stewart
Supporting actors Avery Brooks, Kate Mulgrew, Scott Bakula, Chris Pine, Christopher Plummer, Rene Auberjonois, Ira Steven Behr, John de Lancie, Paul Duraso, Jonathan Frakes, Sally Kellerman, Walter Koenig, Chase Masterson, Robert Picardo, Jeri Ryan, David R. Sparks Jr., Connor Trinneer, Nana Visitor
Studio Brainstorm
MPAA rating NR (Not Rated)
Rental rights 7-day viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

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Customer Reviews

The movie starts out the way you think it will... but then it goes somewhere else entirely.
Langhorne
I thought he gained a great insight into the actors' personalities and how they brought their own personal experiences into the way they portrayed their characters.
Sharon Henry
This is a well done series of interspersed interviews between the Federation Captain actors: Shatner, Stewart, Brooks, Mulgew, Bakula and Pine.
greypilgrim

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

101 of 106 people found the following review helpful By G. Kline on September 16, 2011
Format: DVD
[I watched this on EpixHD and will certainly buy it once available on DVD]

Shatner is a living spectacle of his own accord. He is controversy and entertainment wrapped into one. And unfortunately, his package deal sometimes comes off a bit pompous and egotistical. Few people really like someone who may revel in the enjoyment of his own voice. Shatner at times does this, and yet... if you can get past that veneer, underneath you will find a very fascinating and earnest man. He is someone who lucked into a legendary role that has made him supremely famous, something that for a long period he derided, yet eventually relented and embraced. He is flawed, he knows he is flawed, but he admits it openly with sincerity. I admire him now, more than I ever did.

"You either love him or you hate him," is how I've often heard Shatner described. And in various on-line forums that I've had the pleasure to read, you'll see a wide range of polarized opinions about him. Love him or hate him, he played a very important part in the world of Star Trek. He is essential.

NOTE: There's a review of this movie up on the New York Times website, worth a read. The author hit the nail on the head saying that Shatner's "genial, relaxed self-absorption is a large part of his charm."

So, "The Captains"... Shatner is typical Shatner in some respects, and yet he is also so much better than that. He usually behaves as alpha male, and yet he is ingratiating with his guests. He loves to talk about himself, and yet he is also genuinely interested in others. Making this film was a very humbling experience for Shatner and you can see it in the content.
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50 of 53 people found the following review helpful By The Mandrew on November 10, 2011
Format: DVD
This is one of the most oddly paced documentaries I've seen. The genius/madness/wackness of Shatner ground on me, initially, like nails on chalkboard, and his blatant interruptions of guests, not to mention somewhat horrendous "beat-poetry" with Avery, made me reach for my remote, finger hovering over the stop button.

But I came back to it, for what I would estimate as the last 3/4, and to say it redeemed itself would be an understatement. Like any eccentric character, you have to warm up to Shatners antics, and look for the sincerity amongst the ego. He'll interrupt Patrick Stewart, who is making a profound thought verbal, with some inconsequential question about the smallest of detail, yet tie it all together before its over with and give everyone enough latitude to truly make the interviews two-way. This is a unique but highly interactive interview technique, and as I saw more of it, I grew to like it.

There are some moments, as mentioned before with Avery, that leave you chuckling uncomfortably, but the majority of interactions between Shatner and his fellow captains are earnest, heartfelt, painful, uplifting, and humorous. Pine is the weakest link, but his time on this earth is a fraction of the others. Scott Bakula's catharsis with Shatner about divorce was poignant, and Stewart's earnestness about the love of his craft left me misty-eyed.

Speaking of misty-eyed, the shots from the convention really reminded me what I think most of us that love Star Trek are in it for: the celebration of the ideals and universe that Roddenberry imagined and many have developed into the mythos we have today.
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24 of 27 people found the following review helpful By RainShadow2005 on November 23, 2012
Format: DVD
I wouldn't consider myself a Trekkie, but I am a Star Trek fan. I actually just got done spending a little over a year watching on Netflix every episode of Star Trek in the order that they came out. I even alternated between TNG/DS9 and DS9/VOY episodes in relation to when they aired alongside each other in real life and I worked in the movies as well. This seemed like a fitting capstone to the franchise before I move on.

There were some touching moments in this documentary. Even through Shatner's ego, I could see his vulnerability regarding his relationship with his larger-than-life character, Captain Kirk. He makes an honest attempt to bring the other actors into that light as well, but ultimately he kind of fails. It was hard to watch as the other actors started to get irritated with him and either talked over his interruptions or fell silent with a pained look on their face. I liked the Patrick Stewart and Scott Bakula interviews. The Chris Pine interview didn't get too much attention and the arm wrestling scene was just weird, but his role as Captain Kirk wasn't as significant as Shatner's anyway.

Totally uncomfortable and almost painful to watch were the Avery Brooks and Kate Mulgrew segments. Those two represented modern-day minority actors so their portrayals of Sisco and Janeway in positions of influence always topped my list of inspiring characters. So I was kind of disheartened to see that Avery Brooks seems to be suffering from some kind of mental illness ... or maybe he's just gotten VERY eccentric. Either way, not even Shatner seemed comfortable with the turns his interview took. The way Avery Brooks talked through most of his interview reminded me of the crazy babbling I find printed on the label of every Dr. Bronner's Castile Soap bottle I buy.
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