The Case for Christmas and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy New
$2.89
Qty:1
  • List Price: $2.99
  • Save: $0.10 (3%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Want it Monday, April 21? Order within and choose Two-Day Shipping at checkout. Details
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more

The Case for Christmas: A Journalist Investigates the Identity of the Child in the Manger Paperback


See all 8 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from Collectible from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$2.89
$0.01 $0.01 $7.90
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Frequently Bought Together

The Case for Christmas: A Journalist Investigates the Identity of the Child in the Manger + The Case for the Resurrection: A First-Century Investigative Reporter Probes History's Pivotal Event
Price for both: $5.58

One of these items ships sooner than the other.

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Paperback: 96 pages
  • Publisher: Zondervan Publishing Company; English Language edition (October 1, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0310254760
  • ISBN-13: 978-0310254768
  • Product Dimensions: 6.6 x 4.2 x 0.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.1 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (53 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #64,504 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Back Cover

Says Lee Strobel, the author of The Case for Christmas: Who was in the manger? Even after two millennia, controversy continues to swirl around the Christmas child. “Scholarly debate is intensifying over who Jesus actually was: divine, human, or both?” said a recent article in The Chicago Tribune. “Jesus has been portrayed in a burst of books as, among other things, a Cynic philosopher, an apocalyptic prophet, a zealot, a rabbi, a Pharisee, a feminist, a radical egalitarian, and a postmodern social critic.” Like countless other children, I listened with rapt fascination each year to the traditional Bible story about Christmas. But as I matured, skepticism set in. I concluded that not only is Santa Claus merely a feel-good fable, but that the entire Christmas tale was itself built on a flimsy foundation of wishful thinking. All of that changed, however, after I took a cue from one of the most famous Bible passages about Christmas. The story, recorded in Luke 2:8-18, describes how an angel announced to a ragtag group of sheepherders that “a Savior who is Messiah and Master” had been born in David’s town. Was this a hoax? A hallucination? Or was it the pivotal event of human history – the incarnation of the Living God? The sheepherders were determined to get to the bottom of the matter. “Let’s get over to Bethlehem as fast as we can,” they said, “and see for ourselves what God has revealed to us.” They left, running, to personally investigate the evidence for themselves. Two thousand years later, challenged by my agnostic wife’s conversion to Christianity, I also undertook an urgent mission to determine the true identity of the child in the manger. Through interviews with scholars and other experts, I sought to resolve the question best posed by Jesus himself: “Who do you say that I am?” The Case for Christmas retraces and expands upon my journey by delving into the roots of this most cherished holiday. Can we believe in our scientific age that Jesus was really born of a virgin? Is there astronomical support for the mysterious star that led three individuals to the newly born “king”? Does history support the Bible’s claim that a Roman census sent Mary and Joseph to Bethlehem or that Herod the Great ruthlessly slaughtered the children of that rural village, seeking to destroy his supposed rival? Did Jesus match the prophetic “fingerprint” of the Messiah? And did he manage to fulfill the attributes of God? By focusing on the “hows” and whys” of Christmas, this warm yet journalistic book will help believers reaffirm their faith while guiding seekers as they pursue solid answers about this miraculous occurrence. The evidence is in. The verdict is up to you. --This text refers to the Unknown Binding edition.

About the Author

Lee Strobel was the award-winning legal editor of The Chicago Tribune and is the best-selling author of The Case for Faith, The Case for Christ, and The Case for a Creator. Visit Lee's website at: www.leestrobel.com. SPANISH BIO: Lee Strobel tiene una licenciatura en periodismo de la Universidad de Missouri y una maestria en estudio de leyes de la Universidad Yale. Fue el galardonado editor legal del periodico Chicago Tribune y esceptico espiritual hasta el ano 1981. Es autor de exitos de ventas del New York Times de casi veinte libros y ha sido entrevistado por numerosos programas nacionales de television, incluyendo 20/20 de la cadena ABC, Fox News y CNN. Cuatro de sus libros han ganado el premio Medalla de oro y uno de ellos fue el ganador del premio Libro cristiano del ano 2005 (el cual escribio junto a Garry Poole). Lee sirvio como pastor de ensenanza en las Iglesias Willow Creek y Saddleback. Ademas, contribuye como editor y columnista de la revista 'Outreach'. el y su esposa, Leslie, residen en Colorado. Para mas informacion, visite: www.leestrobel.com --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Lee Strobel (www.LeeStrobel.com), with a journalism degree from the University of Missouri and a Master of Studies in Law degree from Yale Law School, was the award-winning legal editor of the Chicago Tribune and a spiritual skeptic until 1981. His books include four Gold Medallion winners and the 2005 Christian Book of the Year (coauthored with Garry Poole). He and his wife live in Colorado.

Amazon Author Rankbeta 

(What's this?)

Customer Reviews

Great book, easy read, good research.
michael cardinell
Reviewed by Richard R. Blake for Reader Views (10/07) Lee Strobel, award-winning author, journalist and investigative reporter, has written "The Case for Christmas."
Reader Views
I highly recommend this to churches and anyone who wants to help others understand the true meaning of Christmas and Christ.
Toni Marino Ferry

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

17 of 20 people found the following review helpful By G. Murray on October 26, 2008
Format: Hardcover
if you're going to buy this, you might as well buy the Case for Christ instead. It has ALL the content in this book and Case for Easter and then some. Much more bank for your buck
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 15 people found the following review helpful By R. Michael Friends on December 9, 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Lee Strobel's little bitty book, The Case for Christmas, does a good job at its intended purpose, which is to evangelize to non-Christians and skeptics. Like his other books, he presents counter arguments to those skeptics who do not really know Christianity. If you have read his other books, you have read everything in this book, too. The Christmas story itself is almost a minor topic. A Christian with the most basic knowledge of the Bible will not find much here. That is the weak point of the book for me, he just barely scratched the surface when there was potential for so much more.

Brother Lee does a good job of defending an early date for the Gospels (to support their credibility as eyewitness accounts). While he makes the case for the Synoptics, he leaves John at a later date, maybe 90 AD. Yet, when he talks about historical accuracy, he rightfully shows John is reliable, and one example he made was John 5:1-15, the story of the Pool of Bethesda, that pool with five porticoes. This place was not known in modern times until it was excavated by archeologist. It was just as John described.

That much is good, but Lee could have taken the next step. John talks about these pools in the present tense. The historian Josephus mentions that this northern district, where the pools were located, was incinerated early in the revolt by Cestius, in October of 68 C.E. (Jewish Wars 2.250). He also says that in May of 70 C.E., the Romans breached the first wall in the northern part of the city and destroyed it, in the district which he said had been previously destroyed "by Cestius" (Jewish Wars 5.302). Josephus tells that the entire city of Jerusalem, by order of Caesar, was razed to the foundations when the Romans overtook the Jews (Jewish Wars 7:1).
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Stalking the Easter Peeps on December 28, 2010
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I felt that the author did his homework and made a sincere effort to do research, however I also got the feeling that a lot of his research landed on the cutting room floor. The interviews with various scholars all left me feeling that a great deal more was said than was presented. I felt that the author went into all of the interviews with a 'chip on his shoulder' (in fact, he pretty much came out and said so in a couple of places) and I feel strongly that that is NOT good reporting or investigative technique. At no point was the author rude or unpleasant, but his attitude was quite challenging, and that made me question the validity of the interview. On the other hand, he was scrupulously honest in admitting when the answers to his questions really made him see the other person's perspective or point, and that counts for a lot, IMO.

Overall, while I found this book to be very interesting, I felt that it was lost somewhere in the grey area between 'light reading' and 'scholarly writing'. It was written more towards the scholarly side, yet all the data and details weren't presented - it was 'dumbed down' a bit for the general reader. As someone whose tastes run more to the scholarly, I'd prefer it to have had a bit more 'meat', but I also recognize that the author was trying to appeal to a much wider audience, and can't fault him for that, just because of my personal tastes. In the end, I felt that the book protrayed the author as being too easily persuaded, due to the amount of informtion that was (most likely) presented at his interviews, but which didn't make it into the book. I'd recommend this for someone who wanted a little more than light reading, but didn't want to be bogged down with a heavy-duty scholarly tome.

Note on Kindle formatting: Very good. No issues noted.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Steph on December 21, 2010
Format: Kindle Edition
The Case for Christmas was a much easier read than The Case for Christ. It's basically a preview to The Case for Christ without all of the overwhelming details and questions. I do wish there had been more of a focus specifically on the fact that Christ wasn't actually born on December 25th but overall, really good reading!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By D. Kinney on January 4, 2010
Format: Paperback
I have enjoyed all of the Strobel's writings. From Case for Faith to Case for Christ, his work is thorough yet very readable.

I purchased Case for Christmas as a nice little book to read for the holidays. It seemed familiar like I had read it before. I pulled out my copy of Case for Christ and compared notes. Lo and behold, I had read it before. Case for Christmas is 5 chapters pulled from Case for Christ plus an introduction, "Who was in the manger that first Christmas morning?" I had thought it was a whole new book. So for anyone who has read Case for Christ, you have already read Case for Christmas. For anyone who has not read Case for Christ, Case for Christmas is a great entry into the writings of Strobel.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Clifford Hammer on December 1, 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Because it's so informative, I've read The Case For Christ at least three times in the past year. Now I purchased The Case For Christmas because I thought it would be different. Instead I find that I'm basically reading the same book, but in a more concise way. Most of the book is word for word the same, so if you can afford it, buy The Case For Christ and get more for your money.
Also,this The Case For Christmas paperback is about half the size of the other book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Product Images from Customers

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search
ARRAY(0xa1ded0f0)