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Comment: The cover of this paperback book has curled corners. This paperback book shows normal wear and tear. The edges of the pages have markings, spots, or stains. This book's text has light highlighting or underlining. Shipped to you from Goodwill of the Valleys, Roanoke VA. Thank you for your support!
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The Case for Covenantal Infant Baptism Paperback – August 1, 2003

3.8 out of 5 stars 10 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

Review

"Seeing baptism in the light of covenant theology unfolds the richness of the promises set forth in that blessed sign and seal. This volume is a welcome exposition of the biblical doctrine." --J. Ligon Duncan III

"Any church that desires to pass the torch of the gospel to the next generation must understand this book." --John P. Sartelle Sr.

About the Author

Gregg Strawbridge is pastor of All Saints’ Presbyterian Church (CRE), in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, and director of an Internet audio library. He has taught college-level courses at several campuses and has written on a variety of issues related to theology, apologetics, and worship.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 336 pages
  • Publisher: P & R Publishing (August 1, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0875525547
  • ISBN-13: 978-0875525549
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6.4 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #346,143 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
This book is a good introduction to someone wanting to learn about the Reformed view of baptism. There are some really good essays in this book and there are others that are mediocre. I will analyze it by each chapter and the contribution that each person makes to the debate.

Bryan Chapell "A Pasotoral Overciew of Infant Baptism" - This essay attempts to give readers an overview of a pastoral explanation of infant baptism. Instead of being rigorous exegetically and theologically, a practical explanation is given. It is a good practical explanation of the practice, but does lack the rigor of the other essays.

Daniel Doriani "Matthew 28:18-20 and the Institution of Baptism" - This essay is a good explanation of how the institution of baptism in Matthew 28 and Mark 16 does not preclude the baptism of infants. It is fairly rigorous in its exegesis, but it could have been better.

Joel Beeke and Ray Lanning "Unto You and to Your Children" - This was a good essay of a neglected text by Baptists, however it was very repetitive. It could have been better, though.

Jonathan Watt "The Oikos Formula" - This was a good essay on the nature of the household in the Jewish world. It goes over the linguistic usage of 'oikos' and all of its cognats in the New Testament. It was well written.

Mark Ross "Baptism and Circumcision as Signs and Seals" - This was an essay designed to connect baptism as circumcision and what all they signify. Overall, it was fairly well written.

Joseph Pipa "The Mode of Baptism" - This essay was written to argue against a strict adherence to immersion as the proper mode of baptism. It was a very good essay and crushing in its conclusion.
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Format: Paperback
Here's a short review of each essay:

Gregg Strawbridge: Intriguing. Although he gives too much weight to the arguments of those who oppose infant baptism, he succinctly points out their case is based on inference.

Bryan Chapell: Good. He analyzes the biblical accounts of household baptisms. He takes the view that infant baptism is a seal which can be applied before the recipient meets the conditions of the covenant.

Daniel M. Doriani: Not about infant baptism. More of a curiosity piece, really.

Joel R. Beeke and Ray B. Lanning: Tries to prove too much.

Jonathan M. Watt: Depends too much on the culture of the time.

Mark E. Ross: Great. Fascinating examination of both circumcision and baptism as signs and seals. "What is signified and sealed by baptism is what God demands of us, not what we have pledged to God."

Joseph Pipa: Good. Shows that baptism does not mean immersion. Article is somewhat wordy.

Jeffrey D. Niell: Great. A tour de force on the relation between Jeremiah 31 and Hebrews 8. He makes a convincing case that this is the doing away of the ceremonial law.

Richard L. Pratt Jr.: A much weaker essay on the relation between Jeremiah 31 and the New Testament.

Randy Booth: Good. A sweeping overview of covenant transition, useful for more than just the subject of baptism. Not as interesting for those who are skeptical, because of the large number of assertions.

Cornelis P. Venema: Good. A rigorous defense of infant baptism, based on the theology of the confessions.

Lyle D. Bierma: Good. Another rigorous defense of infant baptism, based on the theology of the confessions.
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Format: Paperback
This volume of essays is helpful and informative for all those trying to understand the theology and practice of infant baptism from a covenantal/Reformed perspective. Overall, it is clearly written and positively presented (i.e., not polemical) and written for a popular audience. Most of the essays are good, a few are outstanding (Neil, Pratt, Venema, Strawbrige), a few are weak (they shall remain nameless!) and a few seem slightly off-topic (Doriani, Sproul). I profited from reading this volume, though I cannot say it the last word on the subject (if such a thing is possible). If you want a more scholarly treatment, see Murray's Baptism (although it is dated). We still await a scholarly, up-to-date apology for infant baptism from a Reformed perspective. For the "professor's-only baptism view" (they are not necessarily true believers just because they claim to be!!!), you may want to read Malone and Jewett.
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Format: Paperback
I have found the general evangelical public's ignorance of Reformed Theology, the theology that lead the church away from centuries of superstition and corruption, to be a bit astounding. The evangelical church in America has largely embraced a Baptist perspective on the meaning of conversion and water baptism. Many, if not most, have no understanding whatsoever of any view other than their own.

This book presents the `other' evangelical perspective, the Reformed perspective, on water baptism. With Reformed Theology's resurgence in recent years, it would be to every evangelical Christian's advantage to read this book in order to gain an elemental understanding of their Christian kinsmen's faith.
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