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97 of 112 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A good start to answering difficult questions
Lee Strobel has written several good books that could be especially valuable to someone new in the Christian faith. In fact, even older Christians will appreciate the information offered in The Case for Christ and The Case for Faith, both of which nicely complement each other in their easy-to-read style. In The Case for Faith, Strobel--who is a former skeptic--continues...
Published on March 13, 2001 by E. Johnson

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95 of 114 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good in spots.
The Case for Faith is a simple and readable book based on a good idea: interview top Christian thinkers about questions that many people see as roadblocks to faith. Strobel begins with just the right tone, an empathetic and poignant interview with elderly skeptic and one-time evangelist, Charles Templeton.
Some of the interviews are pretty good, and all of them have...
Published on July 5, 2001 by David Marshall


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19 of 32 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Logic?, November 26, 2001
This review is from: The Case for Faith: A Journalist Investigates the Toughest Objections to Christianity (Paperback)
It was a very good thing Strobel explained early in the book what a good investigative journalist he is and how he likes to ask the really tough questions. It was a good thing, because I never would have realized it from his writings. (...)
Strobel did an unusual thing in his introduction. Not in asking “What is faith?” The unusual thing was that rather than defining it, he states basically infers that the faithful already know what it is. I found it an interesting choice to avoid the subject.
Strobel makes many points that use contorted logic. Despite the contorted logic he presents, he sometimes arrives at some truths anyhow. Some points I agree with, some I don’t. (...) As it was explained in the book, either
A. There is no God; or
B. The Bible is literally true.
One of the concepts he relied heavily on was the argument that, “Christianity is better than other religions, therefore it is true.” (...)
I found two things interesting in the chapter on the origin of life. The first is that Strobel avoids discussing the entire subject of Theistic Evolution -- the idea that God could have created the world using evolution if that is how God chose to have it happen. I was amazed that the subject wasn’t even broached.
My second wonder was, “Why does he care?” How is insignificant. Only who is important.
He has an interesting use of statistics. (...)
Based on what I’ve typed thus far, it must be hard to believe that I am glad I read the book. I am glad mostly because of the summary. There were three things I liked about the summary.
The first was a sense that Strobel realized that not all of his arguments were convincing. He seemed to state that he chooses to have “faith” despite the fact that he hadn’t proven his thesis conclusively. I respect that.
The second was what he seemed to miss in the book, but realized in the conclusion, that faith/belief is a choice. In one chapter he makes fun of atheists who refuse to believe even after you prove the case logically. In another chapter he states that even if an atheist proves her case logically, you shouldn’t change your beliefs because there must be something wrong with their argument you missed. I find it intellectually dishonest to think some people are stupid to cling to their pre-formed opinions, but others aren’t. That he realized in the conclusion that faith/belief is a choice, was a good thing
The third is that faith/belief is an act. He realizes that in the process of having a choice, the person partakes in the action of faith/belief. Faith/belief is clearly in the realm of actions, not graces.
Strobel didn’t take it to the next natural level, that only one who believes works achieve salvation could believe that salvation is achieved by faith/belief. (That or the person holds two opposing opinions, and that happens a lot.)
This book will never convert an atheist, but people who agree with his philosophy will applaud it’s “logic.”
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16 of 27 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars buyer beware, February 6, 2003
By A Customer
This review is from: The Case for Faith: A Journalist Investigates the Toughest Objections to Christianity (Paperback)
There are some good points in this book mixed in with a lot of theologians opinions. Basically what the author did was go to a lot of people, theologians, etc, and ask them the difficult questions that keep people from accepting Christianity. Unfortunately a lot of these are just opinions, like when they were talking about hell and one theologian said that the bible described hell in a figurative way. I don't want to burst anyone's bubble but God described hell as a real place filled with real fire. A lot of opinions make up this book, and their not necessarily the truth.
A better book would be
Know What You Believe, Revised and Updated
by Paul Little
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14 of 24 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars It's a miracle!, April 11, 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: The Case for Faith: A Journalist Investigates the Toughest Objections to Christianity (Paperback)
A close friend came to faith and was baptised *despite* this book. It was given to her by a Christian friend she had asked for help and advice in her faith journey. But it has three profound shortcomings that just about turned her off entirely.
1. Despite what you might assume from the title, the author in fact assumes you are already a Christian. This makes the book totally unsuitable for anyone but the converted. Arguing for faith by using Biblical quotations and life experiences of famous Christians just isn't going to work for a non-Christian!
2. As many other reviewers have pointed out, the arguments are very weak or even laughable. As a reader, I found it very frustrating to see Strobel build his case and then reduce it to an entirely different (and wrong) problem, which he triumphantly solves.
3. The book takes a literal view of the Bible, a view which is not held by all Christians. This is doomed to failure when examined by a thinking person, because Bible contradicts itself in many places, starting with Genesis (two different creation stories, in Genesis ch. 1 & ch. 2 respectively) and carrying on right through the New Testament.
I found that the book _Saving the Bible from Fundamentalism_ by John Shelby Spong, was much more effective at awakening faith, while still adressing some difficult and interesting issues. But no one book is going to answer all questions.
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Very Convincing Read, November 25, 2008
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This review is from: The Case for Faith: A Journalist Investigates the Toughest Objections to Christianity (Paperback)
Lee Strobel has a way of instantly capturing your attention and keeping it until the last sentence. His books are not only informative they are enlightening. From the start of "The Case for Faith," Lee Strobel asks the most difficult questions you could imagine. These are questions that trouble believers and unbelievers alike.

For the answers to his questions he contacts experts and interviews each one on one of the topics/questions presented in this book. Why do many scientists no longer believe that life emerged by chance? Is Jesus the only way to God? Can faith really stand up to reason? How can we worship a God who apparently called for the killing of innocent children in the Old Testament? Why would a loving God torture people in an eternal hell? If God is so loving why does evil and suffering exist?

The questions are tough but the answers are comforting. For years I have struggled with these same questions and finally I was able to read answers that made sense. If you are looking for answers to extremely difficult questions then I can highly recommend this book.

~The Rebecca Review
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars True to its title, September 27, 2007
By 
learjeff "learjeff" (Durham, NC United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Case for Faith: A Journalist Investigates the Toughest Objections to Christianity (Paperback)
For those wishing to find answers to troublesome questions about their faith, this book is excellent.

For those who are seriously investigating the issue of faith, this book presents some interesting arguments, but is of course very one-sided. Compared to a trial, it's like hearing the examination of witnesses without any cross-examination by opposing counsel. As such, it's true to it's title: it's the case for faith, not a balanced "faith on trial".

Some of the arguments are excellent, others are laughable. For example, the discussion of Hell should be very reassuring to many who have difficulty harmonizing that with a merciful and loving God. On the other hand, J. P. Moreland, an intelligent and highly educated man, says of sociobiology that it reduces morality to a happenstance outcome of evolution. This betrays profound ignorance of sociobiology, which discusses the "moral sense" but not morality (values being a subject for philosophy rather than science). The distinction undermines his argument, but the reader gets no clue about such fallacies.
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3 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars THANKS, December 8, 2007
This review is from: The Case for Faith: A Journalist Investigates the Toughest Objections to Christianity (Paperback)
I have just had a daughter.
I try to have "my" own opinion about GOD because I would like to give it and teach it to her. That's my why.
Thanks to this book I am again very interested in GOD and I don't feel I am silly. There are good and clever reasons for being a believer.
Read it and give it a chance. You and God deserve it.
Sorry for my bad English.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A wonderful book, November 11, 2008
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This book provides a logical view of Christianity in todays world. It's not pushy or condicending, "just the facts mam". Well worth the read. Well worth passing it on.
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Easy to read book about tough problems in Christianity, August 26, 2002
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"gaviapacifica" (Aberdeen, WA United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Case for Faith: A Journalist Investigates the Toughest Objections to Christianity (Paperback)
Lee Strobel takes some of the toughest questions that surround Christianity and goes to experts on the subjects to get an answer more than just you can't understand the mind of God.
Strobel never pretends that this book is the end all be all to these questions but he does an excellent job of giving us answers to some of the toughest questions. If you've ever been troubled by why people are tortured in hell or why innocent children are killed then this would be a great book to start with.
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2 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good Objections addressed but not enough real evidence, January 24, 2002
By 
"mustangsally613" (Aurora, IL United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Case for Faith: A Journalist Investigates the Toughest Objections to Christianity (Paperback)
The Case for Faith is about a journalists that attempts to get some explanations to some of the toughest objections of Christianity to date. Now, keeping in mind that the only people Strobel asks are so called "scholars" of Christianity. Since it's not possible that we interview God himself, this book must be taken that the interviewees are giving their intepretation of Christianity or the Bible... not necessarily God. There were some really good chapters in this book, including the chapters "If there is suffering, can a loving God Exist" "If miracles occur that contradict science, how can a rational person believe in God", "If I still have doubts, can I still be a Christian" and "If God really created the universe, why does the evidence of science compel so many to conclude that the unguided process of evolution accounts for life?" These chapters, I believe, provided some very valuable information on the aforementioned issues. The chapters provide alternative ways of explaining the issues, but I don't feel like the interviewees are attempting to talk for God. In the other three chapters, I feel like we are getting somebody's opinion of the chapters and it's almost an arrogant feeling as these scholars attempt to speak for God's feelings, reasoning and so on. Also, I was quite disappointed when I read the chapter in which Strobel brings up the ideas of afterlife other people have such as near-death experiences and reincarnation. The scholar just writes them off as not true and offers no evidence whatsoever for his statements. In fact, the scholar is completely off when he attempts to explain reincarnation. He says well reincarnation can't be possibly, because people that embrace reincarnation believe that in your past and future lives, you could have or will not always be in human form.. meaning you could be a plant, animal or bacteria... whatever. That is the furthest from the truth, because anyone that has done any real studying of reincarnation would realize that no one believes you are coming back in any other form BUT human. So it's obvious the scholar doesn't even really know what he is talking about and attempts to give explanations on something he isn't accurately speaking about.
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The eight most common barriers to faith with explanations, June 10, 2013
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This review is from: The Case for Faith: A Journalist Investigates the Toughest Objections to Christianity (Paperback)
Faith is not always easy to develop; in fact, the Bible openly and candidly acknowledges that faith isnot a possession of all people. In a world powered by technology where science reigns supreme, many ask if faith is simply a relic of a time long past and if it should rightly be discarded. Author Lee Strobel, a former atheist, politely disagrees.

Strobel has written about his own faith and his conversion from atheism to Christianity. He has also authored a series of books that all start with "The Case For..." where he presents a skeptical viewpoint to those he interviews and the challenge is for them to provide convincing evidence for their viewpoint. In this volume, he looks at eight objections many have with mainstream Christianity and how these objections may be answered.

The objections include: why God allows suffering, is God really needed if evolution explains life, why would God torture people in hell, the history of suffering that the church participated in (the Crusades), and if having doubts precludes one from being a Christian. He interviews philosopher Peter Kreeft (a favorite author of mine for his "A Refutation of Moral Relativism"); theologian William Lane Craig; scientist Walter L. Bradley (co-author of the 1984 book Mystery of Life's Origin); university president Norman Geisler; author Ravi Zacharias; theologian J.P. Moreland (who debated with atheist Kai Nielsen); historian John Woodbridge.

His final points are worthy of consideration. Debunking Christianity involves far more than simply raising objections to what one deems wrong about the religion. For every book authored by an atheist questioning faith there are multiple rebuttals, indicating that a lot of relevant evidence is available that creates a strong presumption in favor of faith. Highly recommended.
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