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22 Reviews
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17 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful! Best book ever!
I originally read "The Man in the Ceiling" in the fourth grade and I really didn't understand it, but then in the sixth grade I read it again, and now, as the title of the review mentions, it's my favorite book ever. I am now sixteen years old and I'm still reading it over and over again. The story deals with a young boy who struggles with inadequacy and...
Published on July 12, 2000 by Green Arrow

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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Holiday Montessori Chat & Chew review
We are a group of students in Kansas City, Mo. that read books and discuss them over our lunch. Our grades are 4th -6th. We all had different opinions of the book. Most of us really enjoyed the comics, some of related to the fact that he could not draw hands. Many of us related to his family life. His father worked very hard and found it difficult to show emotion...
Published on November 28, 2000


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17 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful! Best book ever!, July 12, 2000
This review is from: The Man in the Ceiling (Hardcover)
I originally read "The Man in the Ceiling" in the fourth grade and I really didn't understand it, but then in the sixth grade I read it again, and now, as the title of the review mentions, it's my favorite book ever. I am now sixteen years old and I'm still reading it over and over again. The story deals with a young boy who struggles with inadequacy and failure. His main aspiration is to become a cartoonist, but he recieves little support from anyone. His father, a bitter overworked man, wishes Jimmy (the boy) would play sports rather than make comics, and because of this, finds it hard to express love toward his son. His sisters nag him and torment him daily and his mother has little to do with what goes with him. Jimmy's uncle, a failure himself, tells Jimmy to keep at it, and he'll eventually make it, but by the end of the story, the uncle himself is the one who is broken (the not the very end, but it's to good to give away.) Not so fast, this story isn't as depressing as I've made it out to be. It's actually very witty and funny and has a dark sense of humor. Comics Jimmy draws are included through out the story and it is interesting to see how Jimmy interprets events and his surroundings into his art. Very funny, but very sad, and with a wonderful ending. What every book should be, regardless of the reading level.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Holiday Montessori Chat & Chew review, November 28, 2000
A Kid's Review
This review is from: The Man in the Ceiling (Hardcover)
We are a group of students in Kansas City, Mo. that read books and discuss them over our lunch. Our grades are 4th -6th. We all had different opinions of the book. Most of us really enjoyed the comics, some of related to the fact that he could not draw hands. Many of us related to his family life. His father worked very hard and found it difficult to show emotion. One day the family went to a play produced by their artistic uncle. The father saw himself in the play as he acted towards his family. The character that he compared himself to was a robot with no emotion. After the play he tried to show more emotion to his family. The main character Jimmy is nothing like his father.For one,Jimmy likes to draw comics and is more of a artistic kind of kid unlike his father who likes baseball and his work.Then there is this boy at school (Charlie Beemer)who wants for Jimmy to draw his ideas in exchange for his friendship.Jimmy likes to draw his own ideas.In the end his father finds more time for his family. In all we all think that you will like the book THE MAN IN THE CELLING.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The man in the ceiling, March 24, 2006
A Kid's Review
This review is from: The Man in the Ceiling (Michael Di Capua Books) (Paperback)
The Man in the Ceiling, by Jules Feiffer

Review by Jack Humsey

This story is about a boy named Jimmy, who thinks he is a failure. Jimmy is eleven years old, and is very quiet and artistic. He mostly draws comics like the ones in comic books. He finds the true meaning of effort and confidence through his ambition to become a famous cartoonist. Jimmy's family is very odd in many ways. His dad is all about business and his mom, like Jimmy, is an artist. But they both don't understand why Jimmy's hobby and ambition is drawing cartoons. His biggest fans are his younger and older sisters. But his older sister pushes him around and is angry all the time.

I think the strengths of the book are the transitions. They are very dramatic. The characters go from loneliness to happiness. I think transitions are important in books because they help the reader get the feeling of the settings and people.

It was hard for me to choose something to criticize. But if I had to choose, I would change the father's personality. At the beginning of the book he wasn't interested in his son's work at all, but after the success of the weird uncle's play, the father realized that his son is very unique. That didn't entirely make sense to me.

This book would help some readers build their own confidence. It would be good for people who are artistic and imaginative, people who prefer to work alone. People who are lonely would relate to this book.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Not just for children., August 30, 1999
This review is from: The Man in the Ceiling (Hardcover)
My husband and I drove our son to college and on the 5-hour ride home, I read the entire book to my husband. We loved it! My younger son a cartoonist and I found so much truth in the book. I suspect, also, that this book is also somewhat autobiographical; it hits the mark so well. I recommend it to anyone.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Read this two times in a row!, May 12, 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: The Man in the Ceiling (Michael Di Capua Books) (Paperback)
A wonderful book with a well-realized and very funny family. Feiffer absolutely captures many confusing emotions and situations that can arise when you're a kid and that you remember when you're a grown-up. And seriously, I turned to the last page, cried, and then returned right to the beginning again.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Well written but disappointing story., July 17, 2013
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This review is from: The Man in the Ceiling (Michael Di Capua Books) (Paperback)
Off the back of finishing Roald Dahls books, my 8 year old daughter and I picked out The Man in the Ceiling, based on the good reviews it received. Unfortunately, we were disappointed with the book. Although well written, I wouldn’t call the story strong and my daughter wanted to quit reading before we reached the end (which is a first for her).
Obviously, each reader may see something different in the story, it just wasn’t for us.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A powerful message for everyone., March 18, 2000
This review is from: The Man in the Ceiling (Hardcover)
Ever felt like a failure? Like you can't do anything? This is how Jimmy Jibbit feels about himself. In his opinion, the only thing he'll ever be able to do is draw comics. Not only will most people be able to empathise with Jimmy, they'll also learn the most important lesson: it sometimes takes a million mistakes until you create a master piece, and you just have to stick with it.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars a good intro to the Feiffer oeuvre, April 4, 2005
This review is from: The Man in the Ceiling (Paperback)
He's bad at sports and not much better at school, but Jimmy sure can draw terrific cartoons. And his dream, like that of his Uncle Lester, who writes flop Broadway musicals'is to be recognized for what he loves doing most.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Sensitive, insightful, singular, superb, May 20, 2006
This review is from: The Man in the Ceiling (Michael Di Capua Books) (Paperback)
I don't remember how I came upon this book, or really how this book found its way to me. I was around twelve years old when I first read it and it resonated with me. Everyone feels out-of-place at times, as if we are constantly trying to fill shoes too large or too grandiose for our feet. Jimmy, our underdog, understands this feeling of inadequacy, and Feiffer articulates it with the syntax and sadness of any child--or adult--who has felt unloved and unwanted. Jimmy wants to be a hero, but more than that he wants a hero to whom he can look for guidance and advice but finds no one. His journey from eager, malleable child to defined young man is one of the most fascinating and poignant metamorphoses in any book I have come across.

Often in books written by authors whose ages are far removed from their respective protagonists, their main characters' voices become mixed with the adults who write them. Jimmy's voice is authentic in part because Feiffer intersperses Jimmy's story with Jimmy's own comics, which represent visually Jimmy's change.

A truly wonderful read, especially for the perceptive child and sensitive adult. The final moments of the book alone are worth the read.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A fabulous, funny, feel-good story!, July 8, 1999
This review is from: The Man in the Ceiling (Hardcover)
This is an absolutely wonderful work of art! The poignant story of a boy's discovery of his own ability to push past failures to accomplish something difficult is studded with laugh-out-loud portraits of family members, and hilarious episodes of family life. It is filled with truth and love. And the cartoons and illustrations are an entirely wonderful addition to the story. They are excellent in their own right, and add immeasurably to the tale.
My daughter picked this book out of the library at random, was glued to it for a day, and told me I should read it. Boy, was she right! Try it, and see if you don't come up laughing and crying at the end.
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The Man in the Ceiling (Michael Di Capua Books)
The Man in the Ceiling (Michael Di Capua Books) by Jules Feiffer (Paperback - June 8, 1995)
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