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45 of 49 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars HIS MIND IS HER PRISON
{WARNING: There might be some spoilers here!}

First of all, let me start off by stating the obvious: this is not your average suspenseful cop chases killer kind of movie (it has far more substance than that). As well as achieving the understandable squeal or two (often because of grotesque things happening, such as flesh being stretched from suspension and...
Published on February 17, 2005 by Clarissa

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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Visually stunning and powerfully acted yet sadly forgettable...
I think the best way to describe `The Cell' is to imagine `Law & Order: SVU' if it were on the Sci-Fi channel. Catherine Deane fits nicely into the `Olivia Benson' role, the sympathetic and emotionally attached partner to Peter Novak's `Elliot Stabler' character, the aggressive and angry FBI agent. If you think about `The Cell' in this manner then you are bound to find...
Published on June 6, 2008 by Andrew Ellington


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45 of 49 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars HIS MIND IS HER PRISON, February 17, 2005
By 
This review is from: The Cell (New Line Platinum Series) (DVD)
{WARNING: There might be some spoilers here!}

First of all, let me start off by stating the obvious: this is not your average suspenseful cop chases killer kind of movie (it has far more substance than that). As well as achieving the understandable squeal or two (often because of grotesque things happening, such as flesh being stretched from suspension and intestines being pulled out), The Cell's visionary special effects is pure eye-candy that will undoubtedly thrill and excite you...

The film at first is divided into two different storylines. You have child therapist, Catherine Deane (played by Jennifer Lopez), who has devoted her life in trying to awaken a young boy by the name of Edward whom has lapsed into a coma. Then there is a swarm of FBI agents and criminal investigators (primarily Peter, played by Vince Vaughn) searching for clues to hunt down a serial killer that drowns his victims (all beautiful blondes), bleaches them to look like dolls once dead and then puts collars on them to make them feel that they belong to him.

Eventually these two storylines merge together...

When the FBI discovers where the suspect Carl (Vincent D'Onofrio) is living they immediately raid his house, but what they find is him lying unconscious on the kitchen floor. They rush him to the hospital and are crushed to learn that he has fallen into a catatonic state that is non-curable due to a mental illness of severe schizophrenia. He, unfortunately, is the only one who knows where his latest victim Julia is, so during the next 40 hours they must figure out where that is before the tank she's captured in fills up with water. The FBI then recruits Catherine to use an experimental device that links the two and enables her to travel within the killer's dark, perverse mind. Thus we enter imaginative worlds that intertwine reality with fantasy. Here Carl is a King in a very twisted kingdom, but as she delves deeper into his abusive childhood to better understand why he's the way he is, she tries to get him to trust her so that he'll reveal Julia's whereabouts before it's too late. Things get way out of hand, though, and when Catherine confuses reality with Carl's nightmarish dreamworld, Peter must go in to remind her that this is "not real" so that his mind doesn't become her prison...

'The Cell' is not quite a masterpiece but it is brilliantly unique nonetheless and is definitely one of the more original thrillers I've yet to see. And believe me, this is coming from a person who is not a big fan of Jennifer Lopez. I, however, truly feel she put on a good performance here. Therefore I recommend at least renting!
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26 of 30 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An Underrated Masterpiece of a Thriller, February 17, 2005
This review is from: The Cell (New Line Platinum Series) (DVD)
Pathos and Hate; they are about as far apart as two emotions can be, and yet so often the two come hand in hand. Above all it is this aspect of first time director Tarsem's The Cell, and not the stunning visuals, which makes the film's most effective impact. The Cell is not just another case of style over substance as so many have said it to be, but rather an emotional tale of anger, fear and ultimately forgiveness that is told through the use of striking images instead of just dialogue.

The film's central character is Catherine Deane, a child psychologist portrayed by Jennifer Lopez, who has spent a number of months using a brand new experimental technology in an attempt to help a young boy come out of his catatonic state. The boy is the son of the millionaire helping fund the project, and the technology is a device that allows one to enter the mind of another. The film's opening scene takes place in one of these situations as we see Catherine in a desert wasteland trying to make a connection with the child in question, but like her prior attempts it too ultimately ends in failure. Upon this latest failure the boy's father decides to end his son's involvement in the experiment, only to give Catherine a few more months after being convinced otherwise by the designers of the project, Dr. Miriam Kent (Marianne Jean-Baptiste) and Henry West (Dylan Baker). During the film's introduction of Catherine we also get a quick glimpse of her life, or rather her lack of one, as she has engulfed herself with the project to such an extent that she has time for little else.

At the same time we are introduced to Carl Stargher, a demented and very complex serial killer, played by Vincent D'Onofrio in an absolutely astonishing performance that is so good that I would be tempted to recommend the film on it alone. Carl is about as strange as they get (at least in an R-rated film) as he finds relief by torturing young women in "The Cell" an escape-proof room that slowly fills with water until his victim drowns. And as we are shown in one of the film's more disturbing scenes, Carl watches his victims as they drown while hanging midair on a number of hooks that have been inserted into his back. Once Carl has gone through that part of the process, he continues his ritual by turning his victim into a doll-like creation through the use of bleach. Again, as sick as it is, Carl somehow finds comfort in it all.

Carl is also extremely sloppy; he dumps the bodies where it is easy to find them and leaves a number of clues behind wherever he goes. The FBI, which believes that Carl wants to be caught, is right on his tale, and almost ready to make an arrest. Agent Peter Novak (Vince Vaughn) is in charge of the manhunt, which quickly locates Carl. The only trouble is that Carl, who still has one more victim in the process of being tortured, is found lying in a coma after suffering one too many seizures. In order to find the last of Carl's victims before her fate is sealed it is suggested that Catherine should go into the Carl's mind. Despite having her doubts Catharine agrees to do so. Upon doing so The Cell starts to work on a whole new level.

Catherine's first encounter is with Carl's younger-self, who is the exact opposite of the Carl's current state, but at the same time troubled in his own way. Catherine attempts to make the connection, but can't as young Carl disappears without a trace. Soon afterwards the first interaction occurs between Catherine and Carl's other personality, an evil demon-like creature who rules supreme in the world that has been constructed within Carl's head, in one of the film's most visually striking scenes. During her second "session" Catherine encounters young Carl once again, with young Carl opening up to her (and us) for the first time. We see what turned Carl into what he was and his "reasoning" for his actions. This second encounter is one of the film's best overall scenes as it leaves us with a number of feelings towards Carl. We hate him, we fear him, and yet we start to feel sorry for him (or at least for his inner-child) despite what he has done. Yet, Tarsem doesn't overdo the sympathy that he creates for Carl, as we are soon reminded once again of what Carl really is and in doing so an excellent balance is formed throughout, and in this scene especially, between the three aspects of Carl's persona.

The rest of the film is filled with interesting, and often disturbing images throughout that I will leave for you to discover. However, the vast majority of the imagery in these scenes, as it was with the earlier scenes, is used to tell the story. There are very few images that serve no other purpose than to be looked at, another aspect that makes The Cell such an amazing film. Furthermore, in doing so the film leaves much to the imagination of the viewer as definite answers are not given but instead suggested by the film's imagery. In this sense the film generated some of the same reactions that are generated in my mind while watching 2001: A Space Odyssey. At first glance the films have almost nothing in common (other than their trip-out scenes), but upon getting into the film, The Cell, like 2001, also says something (although it be very different) about the human race through the use images instead of just words.

Much has been made about the underdevelopment of both Catherine and Peter. While it is a problem, it isn't that big of one, especially in the case of Catherine since we get to know a lot about her from the interactions she has with all three parts of Carl. Vaughn's character was by far the weakest of the three leads as he was primarily used to move the story along. With that small exception The Cell works in every other aspect. In addition to what has already been mentioned, The Cell also works as a film that terrifies. While it isn't filled with jump scenes or many other moments that are terribly scary in themselves, it is able to create a frightening experience nonetheless (think The Exorcist rather than a standard slasher flick) by the sense of eeriness that accompanies the film as a whole. I could literary talk about The Cell for hours, but instead of saying anymore I'll leave the rest up to you, as it truly is a film that should be experienced first hand and a film that I will personally never forget.

****, (10/10)
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19 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Tarsem and J. Lo rule., February 15, 2001
By 
E. Frampton "Parandot" (Wexford, PA United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Cell (New Line Platinum Series) (DVD)
Tarsem Singh the director of The Cell shows that he knows exactly what he's doing when he is behind the camera. This serial killer film is one of the best films of 2000. The plot of this movie has a great hook. The entering of a persons mind by a second person. Jennifer Lopez's character has to enter the mind of a serial killer in order to figure out where a missing girl is before she drowns in his sick trap. The plot isn't all though. The stellar direction courtesy of Tarsem, using a combination of computer effects and elaborate sets, he creates the inner recesses of the mind with a very distinct visual flair. From the disturbing mind of Carl which encompasses a rather surprising setpiece involving a horse, to the serene desert of a little boys mind, the sheer staggering beauty of the images is hard to describe. But on top of this, Tarsem shows an exceptional talent for storytelling also. He cuts between the search for the missing girl, and "J.Lo" searching the mind of Carl with absolute precision. The suspense is excellent, i was unable to turn away from the screen. The acting is rather good in this movie also. Jennifer Lopez is a great actress, she gives a very good performance, juggling multiple incarnations of her character, from a sullen therapist to a leather clad uber-warrior wielding a crossbow. Vince Vaughn is given a typical FBI agent character, and is very convincing in his role. And then there is Vincent D'Onofrio, probably the most underrated actor in hollywood, he has always been great. This is just another example, he is just disturbing, a complete sociopath. Vincent plays him perfectly. This visionary, ultra-entertaining film, strays from the norm and pays for it. People hate it, because they like their serial killers charismatic like Hannibal, not to be completely indecipherable like Carl, that's a real shame. Because this movie has a lot to offer, if given the chance.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A visually stunning, mesmerizing experience, October 4, 2002
This review is from: The Cell (New Line Platinum Series) (DVD)
The Cell is quite simply an incredible motion picture, straddling several genres while forging an identity uniquely its own. The concept of mind-linking is a little futuristic, but the plot remains strong and believable from start to finish. The acting is terrific, especially on the part of Jennifer Lopez and Vincent D'Onofrio. The visual effects are stunning, intricately detailed, and mesmerizing, to say the least. In terms of content, the movie can be disturbing and perhaps horrifying to some individuals, but there is nothing I would characterize as gratuitous gore. Besides the sheer beauty of this film, I was greatly impressed by the symmetry of the presentation; this applies to single scenes as well as the movie as a whole.
J. Lo plays psychologist Catherine Deane; in an attempt to reach a comatose boy, she employs an advanced technology to link with and actually enter the mind of her patient; this is an experimental treatment that produces results very slowly. She soon finds herself asked to do a rush job on a certain man named Carl Stargher. Stargher is a truly demented serial killer whose brain decides to shut down completely just before the police catch him. In a bold attempt to locate the killer's most recent victim, who has only hours to live based on the killer's m.o., the authorities ask Deane to try and communicate with the otherwise unreachable mind of the killer. Running the risk of becoming trapped inside the madman's demented mind, Deane agrees to embark on a mental journey of surreal, mind-altering proportions.
Obviously, a serial killer's mind is a dark, disturbing place. The visual effects of that journey are stunning, marked with incredible beauty as well as nightmarish horror. One is hard pressed to describe this facet of the movie; it is an experience that must be seen to be appreciated. What may strike viewers as most disturbing, though, are the crimes and acts of Stargher. Stargher abducts women, keeping them in an automated torture cell for a couple of days before killing them, bleaching their bodies to make them doll-like creatures. He doesn't stop there, but I won't get into the details of his ultimate purposes.
DVD technology really brings out the great subtlety of the visual effects and highlights the incredible attention to detail on the part of the filmmakers. The extra features are also excellent and diverse. The ability to gain insight into the director's ideas and purposes is most welcome for such an unusual film, and the deleted scenes add depth and further insight into the minds of both Stargher and Deane. There are so many reasons to buy this movie. I think some people avoid The Cell for fear of its disturbing aspects, but I think such perceptions are unwarranted. There is certainly a lot of material here for horror fans to love, and some viewers probably will not fall in love with the movie the way I did, but lovers of well-made movies will find themselves mesmerized by this cinematic masterpiece.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Out of the box,, unusual movie, June 12, 2006
By 
Brett Abate (Grand Forks, ND) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Cell (New Line Platinum Series) (DVD)
This movie defies normal conventions and much of the storytelling is done visually. The plot is easy to follow but the real meat of the movie is contained in the visual scenes. Much like foreign films, The Cell is much more ambiguous and non literal than mainstream American films. You could even say that the plot is pedistrian and cliche, but the heart of the movie is how the visuals are executed. You are drawn into serial killer, Carl's mind. D'Onofrio's persona disappears and you are left with the madman and the lost, vulnerable abused human. Vince Vaughn is compelling enough to carry his scenes and doesn't overact. J.Lo is also low key although I don't think she can convey the complexities of her character. She does her job but doesn't go deep enough to make it an outstanding performance. Beware of strong violent images. If you can stomach it though, you may see an original, beautifully designed film. I'd rather see gore in this context rather than the low brow slasher/horror type flicks.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A very positive but cautionary review., January 1, 2006
This review is from: The Cell (New Line Platinum Series) (DVD)
Is the cell a prison? If so for who? For the killer's victims only? Or is it the prison of the mind for each of us? Perhaps it is the prison of our own past conditioning and genetic dispositions... our nurture and nature. Can we escape that prison and be more fully autonomous? (If we just are our own nurture and nature, then who exactly is it that does the escaping from it?) Supposing we can escape, where do we flee to? How do we choose so strange a destination as a new self? Perhaps most importantly; once free, how do we help others escape?

Extending this metaphor of nature & nurture: Is the cell the womb? Does the killer's choice of method (a tank filling with water) represent a returning to the womb? What does his choice of victims represent? I think "his mother" is too obvious an answer. More generally, what are the fundamental relations between men and women of all ages and how can they go horribly wrong?

To its credit, this movie doesn't attempt to explicitly address these or similar questions, but does confront them head on cinematically. It has a spare plot and competent acting, but absolutely lavish visuals... make up, costume, set design, camera work, etc. These really make the movie. Some of the scenes were really very disturbing: I grimaced and had to look away for a time. You have been warned! I felt that, to some extent, this was just another case of the inflationary process of Hollywood trying to get a reaction by outdoing all the other "shock-horror-suspense" films. But I also felt that, ultimately, the scenes were not gratuitous but that each served its purpose.

Similarly, the outstandingly beautiful visuals of the finale, with Jen in her salvific role, can be viewed with the cynical eye according to which we are meant to derive the melodrama's moral of "love-conquers-hate", or it can be viewed as a natural counterpoint to and relief from all of the profound ugliness that had gone before. This scene is very well done and is really a capstone that holds the movie together in my opinion. It's almost worth watching just for this!

By the way, I think Jennifer did a really fine job. I also suspect that anyone who rated this film really low did so because, as has already been noted, some scenes can be positively repulsive. But I think they missed the point if that's the case.

I'm a very hard judge so I give it only four stars but I think it's a very good movie. It's definitely worth seeing if you can take it, and worth buying if you are into suspense/horror, are a big movie collector, or are a J-Lo fan.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Deep And Visually Dynamic Horror Technothriller, May 30, 2010
By 
Stephen B. O'Blenis (Nova Scotia, Canada) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Cell (New Line Platinum Series) (DVD)
A unique combination of horror movie and technothriller, The Cell is a highly innovative, visually marvelous film with emotional depth and strong characters.

The movie launches with two seemingly disparate plot threads, and takes its time in bringing them together. One thread involves a new kind of experimental technology that can sync up brain waves and put one person 'inside' the mind of another. In this case it allows a psychologist (Jennifer Lopez, in probably her best role and performance) to enter the minds of comatose patients and work with them in their own head. Her main patient is a little boy who's physically capable of emerging from his comatose state, but unable to get past some kind of mental block. Lopez, as Catherine, has been involved in a long process of repeatedly entering the child's mind (he knows he's in a coma, by the way), which is represented by landscapes created entirely from each patient's memories or imagination, to try and win his trust and coax him out of whatever mental block he's in.

The second opening thread involves an FBI hunt for the extremely warped, sadomasochistic serial killer Carl Stragher (Vincent D'Onfrio, who's amazingly creepy in here), who captures and films his victims before killing them by drowning in a big glass tank of his own construction, then makes 'human dolls' of them. When the FBI, with agent Peter Novak (Vince Vaughn, turning in a tremendous performance that's totally different from his usual comedic roles) in the lead, finally catches up with him, Stragher is shot and rendered comatose. One recent abductee is still missing, and the FBI's psychological department, which is aware of the experimental work going on with Catherine and her team, decides to take the unorthodox step of asking the researchers to become involved to try and find the location of the still-missing abductee.

The worlds that exist inside Stragher's mind, where Catherine finds herself, are bizarre almost beyond words. The history and origin of Stragher also quickly comes to light, where it's revealed that the serial killer Stragher is only one part of a multiple personality that fractured early in his childhood, due to horrific abuse. Trying to explain a serial killer's background through a tormented past can be tricky - if it works it can come off powerfully and really shake the viewer; if it fails it can come off banal. Fortunately, it works here - just through the brief glimpses we see of the child Stragher, yeesh, you can see why the guy went completely insane.

Some unexpected complications arise inside Stragher's mind. One - more than one of his personalities can be present simultaneously, including not only the mental image the killer Stragher has of himself (which is even more twisted and deadly than the 'real-world' killer) but the original child Stragher, existing as he was before his personality split. The child Stragher is innocent of any wrongdoing, is another victim of violence; the killer Stragher is the persona that's absorbed all the darkness, rage, hate and perversion.

Second complication - you're normally safe when projected by this technology into another person's mind. In Stragher's case, it turns out that if the mind becomes convinced by what it's perceiving that this world and its experiences are real, then, in a kind of Nightmare On Elm Street-twist, you can actually be killed by what happens to you inside this strange world.

The visuals are awesome, and the characterizations are vital: the unnerving contrast between the two facets of Stragher; the powerful, implied backstory to Agent Novak; and the potent depiction of Catherine as driven not by a quest for fame or scientific discoveries, but by a compassionate, deep drive to help the child patients that she develops an almost maternal attachment to. Inside the Stragher mind, this includes the child version of Stragher, who she's driven to protect not only from his older counterpart, but from the incidents of his real-life past that continue to re-occur inside his subconcious. Also worth mentioning is the unique, captivatingly exotic musical score by Howard Shore.

The only shortcoming is length. With all the different things going on in here, the 107-minute run time leaves a few aspects resolved a bit too quickly. The Cell, as great as it is, could have easily benefitted from another 20-30 minutes. Yes, I know that' coming up on the two-and-a-half hour mark; some movies just call to be a bit longer than others, though. All in all though, the couple of aspects that go too quickly do not detract too much from the whole. Still a great movie that thrills, haunts and intrigues. Four-and-a-half stars.

P.S. if you like this one you may also want to check out the similarly themed (but more obscure, and often under-rated) Unspeakable.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Visually stunning and powerfully acted yet sadly forgettable..., June 6, 2008
By 
Andrew Ellington (I'm kind of everywhere) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: The Cell (New Line Platinum Series) (DVD)
I think the best way to describe `The Cell' is to imagine `Law & Order: SVU' if it were on the Sci-Fi channel. Catherine Deane fits nicely into the `Olivia Benson' role, the sympathetic and emotionally attached partner to Peter Novak's `Elliot Stabler' character, the aggressive and angry FBI agent. If you think about `The Cell' in this manner then you are bound to find enjoyment out of it. It's not all that deep emotionally, but it suffices as a decent thriller thanks to some dedicated performances by the entire cast, especially D'Onofrio (of `Law & Order: CI' fame), on whom the entire film depends.

So the whole plot is `way out there' and requires a real suspension of disbelief (but then again this is a Sci-Fi movie, so we are expected to believe `anything' is possible). Carl Stargher is a sadistic serial rapist who tortures his victims by drowning them slowly and then bleaches them and makes them up to look like dolls, and then ditches them in the river. Peter Novak is the FBI agent on his tail and when he finally captures him Stargher falls into a coma, a coma that he will never wake up from, and so Novak enlists the help of psychotherapist Catherine Deane to help. Deane has been using a new technology that allows her to enter the minds of comatose patients and try and coax them out of their sleeplike state. She is asked to enter the mind of this killer in order to find out where he stashed his latest victim; that way they can find her before it is too late and she drowns to death.

Once inside Stargher's mind, `The Cell' transforms from a `Law & Order'esque thriller to an all out horror film complete with some of the most grotesque yet stunningly brilliant imagery I have ever seen. It is here that the film truly shines as D'Onofrio is allowed to take full reign of his character and dominate his surroundings.

More on Vincent in a minute.

The film thrives on the `Alice in Wonderland' gone horror type vibe that runs throughout the scenes within Stargher's head. Everything scene is inspired by some of the most bizarre paintings and artist's imagery around, and the end result is a completely engrossing and stimulating cinematic experience. Whether you are watching a horse be dissected or watching a strange tribalesque baptism or witnessing Vince Vaughn's intestines being slowly pulled from his stomach you are in for a very strange yet very intoxicating ride. There is nothing `pretty' about this world, yet it is gorgeously constructed to become like sinners-candy for the mind. You won't find any of this appealing, but you won't be able to turn your head either.

Here is where I find a bit of a sore-point as well though. The film in essence is nothing more than a glorified train-wreck. There is nothing of any substantial value. The characters have no real depth (even Stargher is a complete cliché) and so when all is said and done the only real reason to remember this film is the glossy presentation (that, and D'Onofrio). The plot is different and the whole `get inside your mind' approach was neat, but in the end it becomes nothing more than a decent Sci-Fi film. There is no real human development so we wind up not really caring one way or the other.

The acting though is a highlight. Vaughn and Lopez do enough to sell their performances, especially Lopez who actually is a decent actress when the quality of the film is right for her. The quality on `The Cell' isn't particularly high, but she works hard to make her character believable. The real star though is none other than Vincent D'Onofrio who just grabs hold of her character and dominates this movie. One minute he's solemn and disturbed as he `cleans' his victim (one of the most unsettling scenes in the film, yet one of the best acted) the next he is commanding and dominating as the lord of his world; and yet still he captures menace and insanity as he playfully toys with Vaughn's organs. His range is magnificent here and his performance is key to the success of the film. If he had not nailed this performance than this film wouldn't even be worth its technical brilliance.

In the end I can recommend `The Cell' based on the visuals and D'Onofrio. Honestly, as a Sci-Fi thriller is works very well. I may not have enough meat on its bones to constitute a smart and memorable cinematic experience, but it will dazzle and disturb you while you watch it, so who cares if you forget most of what you've seen when the credits finish their stroll.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars J. Lo and a Psycho, March 17, 2003
This review is from: The Cell (New Line Platinum Series) (DVD)
I purchased "The Cell" on DVD before I had even seen the movie, because I just knew I would love it. And I was right. Visually, this film is beautiful; I love the dreamlike (or, is that 'nightmarelike'?) quality of nearly every scene. Plot-wise, this film is creepy .... Jennifer Lopez (before she became WAY over-hyped) is wonderful as Catherine, a psychologist who literally enters the minds of her patients, via some weird machine and a rubber suit. After a serial killer goes into a coma (while his current victim has not been found yet), the FBI enlist Catherine's help, in hopes of tracking down information on the girl's whereabouts. This means Catherine must enter the mind of a psycho, which leads her on a twisted journey into this guy's own personal hell.
Vincent D'Onofrio plays a great villain - in real life, Carl Stargher is a quiet man, strange but almost seemingly harmless. In the other reality that is his mind, he is crazy, dangerous and the king of his own little universe. D'Onofrio plays both parts perfectly. Vince Vaughn is also great as the FBI agent who is anxious to save the madman's current victim. And by the way, the way Carl kills his female victims is terrifying.
Soon after watching "The Cell", I watched "The Silence of the Lambs" for the first time, and I found a lot of similarities: both contain an FBI agent searching for a killer, a psychologist trying to help track him down, and a creepy killer that kidnaps and kills his victims in the most disturbing ways. If you liked "Silence of the Lambs", you will probably enjoy "The Cell" (and vice-versa). Roger Ebert actually named this film as one of his top-ten favorites of 2000, and I can see why. It's well-acted, the cinematography is beautiful, and it's pretty creepy. As far as psycho thrillers go, this one's in a cell of its own.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Awesome, May 26, 2006
This review is from: The Cell (New Line Platinum Series) (DVD)
I LOVE this movie and have watched it numerous times. It not only has an AMAZING plot line (with some gore to it for those with weak stomachs, beware!) and is absolutely visually STUNNING!!!!!!! I can't remember how I cam across this movie, but I'm so glad I did. It is one of my favorites. It is a VERY artistic movie, so those who aren't that into art may not enjoy it as much, but they MAY enjoy the plot. It's very edge of your seat, blow your mind kind of movie. You must stay engaged to follow the plotline!!!!!!!!!!!!
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The Cell (New Line Platinum Series)
The Cell (New Line Platinum Series) by Tarsem Singh (DVD - 2000)
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