The Celtic Way of Evangelism and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy Used
$3.64
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Eligible for Amazon's FREE Super Saver/Prime Shipping, 24/7 Customer Service, and package tracking. 100% Satisfaction Guarantee.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Celtic Way of Evangelism: How Christianity Can Reach the West . . . Again Paperback – February 1, 2000


See all 7 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback, February 1, 2000
$3.78 $0.01

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 144 pages
  • Publisher: Abingdon Press (February 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0687085853
  • ISBN-13: 978-0687085859
  • Product Dimensions: 8.6 x 5.6 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.5 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (57 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #832,430 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Do you agree that Christianity is more effective as a movement than as an institution in evangelizing non-believers? This book explains why that always has been true. Are you engaged in designing a church growth strategy? Rather than reinvent the wheel, learn from others. Study this account of an exceptionally coherent and effective strategy that won the west. --Lyle E. Schaller, Author

George Hunter III imaginatively applies what he takes to be the major themes of the Celtic Christianity practiced in the British Isles between the fifth and tenth centuries to the situation facing churches in the secularised western world today. --Ian Bradley, University of St Andrews

Dr. Hunter has written a rare manuscript in that it is both informative and interesting reading. Those of us who take the Great Commission seriously will learn from this scholarly effort why the old methods of evangelizing no longer work. --William H. Hinson, First United Methodist Church, Houston, Texas

About the Author

George G. Hunter III is Distinguished Professor of Church Growth and Evangelism at Asbury Theological Seminary in Wilmore, Kentucky. A sought-after speaker and workshop leader, he is one of the country's foremost experts on evangelism and church growth.

More About the Author

George G. Hunter III is Distinguished Professor of Church Growth and Evangelism at Asbury Theological Seminary in Wilmore, Kentucky. A sought-after speaker and workshop leader, he is one of the country's foremost experts on evangelism and church growth. Professor Hunter is the author of To Spread the Power, How to Reach Secular People, Church for the Unchurched, The Celtic Way of Evangelism, Leading and Manging a Growing Church, Radical Outreach, and Christian, Evangelical, and . . . Democrat? all published by Abingdon Press

Customer Reviews

The wording and the book was wonderful and I know anyone who reads this will be blessed and thinking about things in different ways.
Genesis Williams
In talking about the way the Celts presented the gospel, Hunter takes principles from Aristotle and Kierkegaard and reads them back into the Celtic way of evangelism.
David T. Wayne
I recommend this book for all church folks who are seeking to not simply get new members, but want to share the good news of Jesus Christ with people.
David E. Loar

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

84 of 88 people found the following review helpful By M. Jeffries on April 12, 2002
Format: Paperback
...
In The Celtic Way of Evangelism, George G. Hunter III explores the spiritual landscape which made Patrick's Ireland (and my local pub) a ready recipient of God's grace. Hunter, dean of the E. Stanley Jones School of World Mission at Asbury Theological Seminary, developed his view of relational evangelism in an environment not unlike my own. He learned that "stained-glass jargon" doesn't play well on the sands and surfboards of muscle beach. ...Perhaps that is why Hunter's perspective of Celtic Christianity resonates so strongly.
Hunter's retelling of the story of Patrick the Precedent Postmodern provides an able framework for understanding the possibilities and priority of mission. Patrick's own spiritual quest, including rejection of his father's religion and discovery of truth in the midst of brokenness, is of foremost and foundational importance. A Briton, Patrick was captured as a teenager by pirates and enslaved in Ireland. During his time as a cattle-herder near the turn of the fifth century, Patrick experienced three transformations which would equip him in his calling. First, he experienced the truth of an intimate relationship with Jesus. Second, he learned who the Irish people were, of their customs and culture. Third, he grew to have genuine love for his captor-brothers. These experiences reflect the three conditions for dynamic and convincing communication found in Aristotle's Rhetoric. Patrick's personal conversion gave him ethos, his understanding of the Celtic people provided pathos, and his love for his captors was his logos.
Patrick was freed from his seminary of servitude after six years, but returned as a missionary nearly three decades later still with this passion within.
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
45 of 47 people found the following review helpful By David T. Wayne on March 20, 2003
Format: Paperback
This book is part history and part "how-to." There is a lot of good historical information in a very short space on Patrick and some of those he influenced. If, like me, all you knew about Patrick was that he had something to do with the Irish people, wearing green and shamrocks, then this book will introduce you to the real reasons for Patrick's fame - his bold missionary ministry to the Irish.
As far as the how-to's go I think the gist of the book can be summed up in a little summmary table that Hunter gives contrasting what he believes is the Celtic Way vs. the Roman Way. The Roman way said that a person has to believe before they can belong. The Celtic way said that a person must belong in order to believe. Therefore, the Roman process of evangelism was 1 - Preach the Christian messsage, 2 - Call to a decision for Christ, 3 - Invite into the fellowship of the church. In contrast, Hunter says that the Celtic was is to 1 - Invite the unbeliever into the community, 2 - Engage them in ministry and conversation - a kind of conversational evangelism focusing on answering the questions of the unbeliever rather than pushing them along a predetermined path or presentation, and 3) Invitation to commitment to Christ and the ministry of the community. Hunter says that, in the Celtic community, "seekers" often came to Christ in a matter of days or weeks as a result of participating in the life of the Christian community.
Hunter suggests that our evangelistic methodology today looks more like the Roman way and that we would be well advised to adopt the Celtic way. As evidence he cites some of his own research showing that most people who do come to Christ come to Christ along a more "Celtic" path - i.e.
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
53 of 57 people found the following review helpful By Rich Carey on April 1, 2000
Format: Paperback
In this book, Mr. Hunter has written an excellent thesis on Celtic Christianity. This is not light reading, but neither is it too heady for the average reader to understand.
The basic thesis of this book is an interesting study of the fifth century evangelization of Ireland by Patrick and how his methods may be effective in today's culture. Mr. Hunter does a fine job of educating the reader about the ways Patrick used to reach a barbaric, pagan nation with the Gospel using very non-traditional methods. He theorizes that in today's world, there is a generation of "New Barbarians" - people whose lives have never been influenced by Christianity and have no true Christian experience. As in the days of Patrick, the religious institutions have failed to make the Gospel highly relative to this culture.
He concludes his study by giving examples of specific churches and ministries who have adopted creative new methods of evangelizing this largely unreached generation and have succeeded. He also issues a moving challenge to Church leaders to make the necessary changes to bridge the gap between the Church and the unchurched and bring in this vast harvest of people who are searching for God in all the wrong places.
I found this book very helpful and encouraging. I highly agree with Mr. Hunter's thesis and join with him in issuing this challenge to the Church. As a pastor, I began making these changes in our church years ago, with some success. More recently, we have been introduced to ministry groups who are literally going into the darkest parts of this alienated culture, living among the people and sharing the good news of the Gospel.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?