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The Children of Pride: Selected letters of the family of the Rev. Dr. Charles Colcock Jones from the years 1860-1868; A New, Abridged Edition Paperback – Abridged, September 10, 1987


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 706 pages
  • Publisher: Yale University Press; Abridged edition (September 10, 1987)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0300040539
  • ISBN-13: 978-0300040531
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 1.6 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,065,937 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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See all 14 customer reviews
I have thoroughly enjoyed it and look forward to finishing it.
K. Berry
A sustaining faith in God was this family's hallmark and their genuine faith and feelings of love was even extended to their slaves.
B Fitzgerald
It's worth every penny, and every minute spent finding the complete version!
J.B.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

25 of 26 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 19, 1999
Format: Paperback
This book shows better than any other the disruptive effect of the Civil War on the lives of real Southern people. In 1,300 letters between many family members, this magnificant book chronicles the Jones family of Liberty County, Georgia from 1854 until the late 1860s. We see the family's lives from day to day as war clouds gather, the son becomes Mayor of Savannah, the army is raised, Sherman's army arrives and pillages the plantation every day for a month, the family becomes destitute refugees from the chaos of war, the slaves become free workers, etc. We see into the minds and hearts of this good family, experience their births and deaths, joys and sorrows and fears, at the time of the nation's greatest political crisis.
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22 of 23 people found the following review helpful By John Rigdon on May 22, 1999
Format: Paperback
The following description of this book is from my Civil War in Georgia website. This book contains some 1200 letters of nearly 7000 extant, between the men and women of a large, well-educated family from Liberty County, Georgia. Although the correspondents are numerous, there are four principal writers. Charles Colcock Jones, Sr., a plantation owner, Presbyterian Minister, and promoter of the spiritual welfare of the slaves; Mrs. Charles Jones, Sr., wrote of everyday events on the plantation, attempts to hold the family together, intrusions by Union soldiers at the family plantation "Montevideo" during Sherman's march, and the eventual sale of the family home and her move to New Orleans; Charles Jr., a Harvard-educated lawyer, described family legal matters, including selling land and slaves, and his experiences in the defense of the Georgia coast and the siege of Charleston. He served with the Chatham Light Artillery Battery and as Colonel, Chief of Artillery, District of Georgia, Department of South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida; Surgeon Major Joseph served in the Confederate Medical Department and conducted research in Confederate prison camps. Among the letters of a sister, Mary Sharpe Jones Mallard, is a description of the siege of Atlanta and her escape to "Montevideo".
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16 of 18 people found the following review helpful By K. Berry on October 18, 2003
Format: Paperback
I am half way through this 1400 page book and it is hard to put down. The UNABRIDGED edition is a must. It includes an INDEX in the back of Who's Who which lists biographies of the Free and the Slaves. These letters reveal the warm relationships between the whites & blacks in this family, the belief that the South was fighting the second American Revolution to preserve a nation under the Constitution and rule of law, the influence of the Scotch Presbyterian church in evangelizing the Negro population with the gospel, the honorable as well as influential position women held in the home as managers of the household, the difficulty of travel by railroad or horseback, what they ate, wore and how they conducted routine business. I have thoroughly enjoyed it and look forward to finishing it. I also recommend "Sarah Morgan's Diary" which is also a firsthand account written in Louisiana by a 19 year old girl. "Sarah Morgan" was much more readable than "Mary Chestnut's Diary" which is probably better known. Sarah Morgan was a gifted writer.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By J.B. on April 11, 2006
Format: Paperback
Like being able to eavesdrop on history, the letters give a vivid account of life before, during and after the civil war. I became fascinated with this format and time period and have also read Mary Chestnutt, Sarah Morgan, and many others, but am now reading The Children Of Pride for the second time. Someone offered to buy my copy, but there is no way I'll ever part with it. It's worth every penny, and every minute spent finding the complete version!
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By N. Wilson on October 13, 2007
Format: Paperback
Today a friend asked me what had been the best Civil War book I had ever read - not a straight history book - and after the briefest thought I said "Children of Pride." I've spent many years thinking about the War, trying to understand the motivations of Americans at that time, and then how they survived such a horrendously wrenching time. "Children of Pride" does it better than anything I have ever read.
I think it is understood that primary sources are the best way to truly understand times as these; this book provides the thoughts of the entire family, all literate and well-spoken people, over the entire period from the 1850s, just living their ante-bellum experience, to the idea of the war on the horizon, entering into it and living it day by day. This is all seen through ordinary every-day experiences, family anecdotes, and discussions of what is occurring. I can't recommend it highly enough for a true understanding of Southern life and views through all these years and well into Reconstruction.
As readers said earlier, the abridged versions absolutely do not do any justice to what the book truly is. The whole work is the only way to experience "Children of Pride."
It has lived with me since I first read it in the 1970s; I would never let my copy out of my hands, and as said above today I realized it was the single best book about the Civil War that I have ever read.
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 1, 2003
Format: Paperback
Winners of the wars get to write the history books...so you have to look a little further to get truer impressions. I use a lengthy excerpt from this book in advanced US History classes to give the kids a clue why the South was so bitter about Reconstruction. They come away very thoughtful. But the unabridged version is the only real deal.
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