The Chinese Economy: Transitions and Growth and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $30.00
  • Save: $5.77 (19%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 13 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Like New | Details
Sold by bookrampage
Condition: Used: Like New
Add to Cart
Trade in your item
Get a $4.24
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Chinese Economy: Transitions and Growth Paperback – October 27, 2006


See all 6 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$24.23
$10.00 $5.90

Frequently Bought Together

The Chinese Economy: Transitions and Growth + Demystifying the Chinese Economy + Sustaining China's Economic Growth After the Global Financial Crisis (Peterson Institute for International Economics - Publication)
Price for all three: $66.80

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 544 pages
  • Publisher: The MIT Press (October 27, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0262640643
  • ISBN-13: 978-0262640640
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 7 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.8 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (18 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #62,062 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Authored by a leading specialist on the Chinese economy, Barry Naughton's book provides a lucid, systematic, and insightful view of China's road to becoming a 'powerhouse of the global economy' as well as of the challenges ahead in sustaining past accomplishments. Designed primarily as a textbook, its comprehensive coverage and sophisticated analysis assure that it will become a valuable and much-used resource for anyone seeking an understanding of China's economy."--Steven M. Goldstein, Sophia Smith Professor of Government, Smith College

About the Author

Barry Naughton, an economist, is Professor and Sokwanlok Chair at the Graduate School of International Relations and Pacific Studies at the University of California, San Diego. He is the author of Growing Out of the Plan: Chinese Economic Reform, 1978--1993 and The Chinese Economy: Transitions and Growth (MIT Press). Wu Jinglian, one of the principal architects of China's economic reform, worked in the Institute of Economics of the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, and the State Council Development Research Center in China. He has held positions at Oxford, Stanford, Yale, and MIT.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
5 star
13
4 star
4
3 star
0
2 star
1
1 star
0
See all 18 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Thomas F. Wilson on December 17, 2008
Format: Paperback
Barry Naughton's "The Chinese Economy: Transitions and Growth" provides a very extensive, in-depth examination of the transition process in the Chinese economy as well as an excellent historical base from which the recent reform process was launched.

Naughton has a proven record of scholarly, informative research on China, as evident in the discussion of a broad range of topics related to China's performance, including of course demographic, environmental, and trade challenges; however, there is a rather lean treatment of the currency valuation issue and other sources of tension in the Sino-American trade relationship. It might be noted too that performance is somewhat ambiguously viewed by alternating between PPP-adjusted and unadjusted GDP.

The speed of the transition in China's economy can leave the statistical support a bit dated, so the reader has to be cautious before quoting the numbers. Overall, though, Naughton's work is a reliable text for understanding China and China's phenomenal growth record.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
14 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Loyd E. Eskildson HALL OF FAME on May 15, 2009
Format: Paperback
Since the early 1980s, China has consistently been the most rapidly growing economy on the planet, sustaining an average annual growth rate of 10% from 1978 to 2005. Haughton provides excellent insight into that growth, especially the transition after 1978. This is especially valuable, given the disastrous floundering that took place in Russia's efforts.

Haughton tells us that China's progress is more easily understood if one realizes it is still completing a transition from bureaucratic socialism to a market economy, as well as in the middle of an industrialization process. The transitions have led to improved living standards, but also increased economic uncertainty and risk - unemployment, deteriorating income distribution, health insurance with gaping holes, inadequate infrastructure, and education.

Geographical Background: China's land area is about 2% greater than that of the U.S., with about 4X the population. Dividing the nation in half, roughly SW - NE, leaves only 6% of the population in its dry, mountainous West; within the Tibetan Plateau lies 25% of the land and 1% of the population. The Yellow River (about 2,900 miles) is one of the great rivers of the world, but runs dry in many years due to withdrawals. The Yangtze has 20X the water of the Yellow, and the Pearl River 6X.

Allowing farmers to work for themselves on newly assigned plots (charged rent and taxes) carved out of the collective farms brought a one-third increase in grain production between 1978-1984, while reducing the hours worked. (The excess largely went into township and village enterprises.) A similar approach in manufacturing brought those enterprises to face "market prices on the margin.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
16 of 20 people found the following review helpful By George Koo on March 11, 2008
Format: Paperback
China's economic development since 1978 has baffled and surprised the world. Other developing economies may regard China with envy but if they are contemplating copying China's model of development, help is at hand. They just need to read Naughton's book.

China's three decade of economic development has been called many things, such as groping stones while crossing the river, three steps forward and two back, bird cage economics, transition from command to market, amazing, miraculous and more. The author has organized the historical date in a way easy to comprehend and coupled with explanations that are lucid and easy to follow.

Textbook conjures up the image of a big snore, but not this one. This one will become essential reference book dogeared by frequent use.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Anna Jaguaribe on July 11, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Barry Naughton wrote the best book yet on the Reform Process in China, in fact a follow up from him would be most desirable.
The book gives a good background for the pre reform period, characterizing the features which will condition, policy choices and facilitate policy implementation. It is a masterful explanation of the complexities of growing out of a command economy and the progressive separation between State and Government which is at the background of the institutional reforms of the 1992-2001 opening up period in China. There is a good discussion of the problems facing the financing system and the intricacies of the relationship between State and Non State industries.
It is a required reading for understanding China today and the many challenges it faces in this new stage of institution reform.
It is an intellectually stimulating, scholarly and most inspired book.
It should be mandatory Reading for all China researchers
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Walter R. Huber on March 4, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This book is a few years old but still has some outstanding information. Some of the changes to the banking sector make it a bit dated there but it is more than worth the money for the chapters on the system prior to 1949, the discussion of the 1949 - 1978 economy, and the 1979 - 2005 economy. It does a great job laying the foundation to understand China's economy and how it runs. Moreover it is one of the few books I am aware of that includes an explanation of the economy from so many different perspectives. Not only does it cover the historical changes, it looks by sector, and at the urban/rural divide. This would be an excellent place to start your understanding of China's economy. I own both a hard copy and a Kindle version.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?