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The Chinese Vegan Kitchen: More Than 225 Meat-free, Egg-free, Dairy-free Dishes from the Culinary Regions of China Paperback – December 4, 2012


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The Chinese Vegan Kitchen: More Than 225 Meat-free, Egg-free, Dairy-free Dishes from the Culinary Regions of China + The Mediterranean Vegan Kitchen + Vegan Italiano: Meat-free, Egg-free, Dairy-free Dishes from Sun-Drenched Italy
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Perigee Trade (December 4, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0399537708
  • ISBN-13: 978-0399537707
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 7.3 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.5 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (26 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #222,278 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Donna Klein, a food writer who has contributed to The Washington Post, Vegetarian Gourmet, Veggie Life, The Herb Companion, and Yoga Journal, studied French regional cooking at Le Cordon Bleu, Paris. She is the author of several cookbooks, including The Mediterranean Vegan Kitchen, Vegan Italiano, Supermarket Vegan, and The Gluten-Free Vegetarian Kitchen.

More About the Author

Donna Klein is a food writer whose work has been featured in such publications as the Washington Post, The Yoga Journal, Body and Soul magazine, and Vegetarian Gourmet.

Customer Reviews

Donna Klein has written another great vegan book.
Seeking Health
The actual instructions for each recipe were also very comprehensive and easy to follow.
Charles Findlay
I found the recipes easy to use and the ingredients easy to find.
Debbie Reynolds

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

66 of 69 people found the following review helpful By Kelly Garbato on December 10, 2012
Format: Paperback
(Full disclosure: I received a free copy of this book for review at the publisher's behest.)

I've taken to reviewing cookbooks lately because I like the challenge. I can be rather lazy when it comes to cooking, and tend to procrastinate to the point where my only choices for dinner are last night's leftovers - or a pita bread pizza. Making unfamiliar dishes, on the other hand, requires planning and flexibility - my culinary arch nemeses! Enter: the cookbook review. Since publisher-provided review copies usually come with a deadline (albeit self-imposed, but then I'm always my own biggest critic), they provide just the right amount of motivation to keep me on track.

So when Penguin USA offered me a free copy of THE CHINESE VEGAN KITCHEN (Donna Klein, 2012) for review, I jumped at the chance. Though I love (some) "Chinese food," my experiences up until now have been limited to the occasional takeout and prepackaged vegan egg rolls found at the local supermarket's "meals to go" cooler. Before last month, I'd never so much as made my own lo mein - let alone assembled egg rolls from scratch!

The same time I was working my way through the recipes in The Chinese Vegan Kitchen, Salon featured an interview with English Fuchsia Dunlop in which she "explain[ed] Western misperceptions about one of our favorite culinary imports": There is no "Chinese cuisine". In a country as large and diverse as China - more the size of a continent than a nation - to speak of one common culinary style amounts to an "over-simplification." Chinese food, says Dunlop, is at once "varied and multi-faceted," yes shares certain cultural elements.
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By becca on March 1, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I enjoy this book for it's ease and the fact that most ingredients are supermarket friendly. The Ramen soup is wonderful, has a lot less sodium than the packaged stuff and literally takes 5 minutes to make. If you have a number of cookbooks in your repertoire, I would add this one too. However, if you're looking for solidly consistently great chinese recipes with more of an authentic flare, I like Bryanna Clark Grogan's Authentic Chinese Cuisne.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By myopiniononthis on February 26, 2014
Format: Paperback
I'm a big fan of the author's cookbooks for several reasons. She avoids meat and cheese substitutes. She uses a lot of fruits and vegetables and often has nice, light recipes for Summer that differ from the often carb-heavy standards of vegan cookbooks. She avoids foods that many vegan cookbooks rely on that are allergens for some people and their dinner guests like soy foods, seitan/gluten and nut creams. She usually has a mix of more complex, authentic dishes mixed in with some simple, easy recipes you can whip up fast with supermarket ingredients. All of these qualities are true of this book ( though it does use some tofu and seitan in culturally specific recipes that call for them).
However this cookbook has some major cons and is my least favorite of her books ( I have most of them).
1 ) There are just so many better Asian food cookbooks out there that are either more authentic or contain more of the familiar classics. There's "the Asian Vegan Kitchen" if you want something authentic. There's "30 Minute Vegan's Taste of the East" if you want to duplicate restaurant standards like sesame tofu and Thai iced tea.
2 ) I'm old enough to remember the bad old days of vegan food when people came up with weird, random flavor combinations like bananas in spinach salad and tofu in spaghetti. She usually keeps those recipes to a minimum and sticks to naturally vegan classic from various world cuisines. However this book seems to have an awful lot of such recipes. There's a strange, sweet soup made from apples, figs and vegetable broth. There's a cookie made from Chow Mein noodles and chocolate that I'm pretty sure people in China don't eat.
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17 of 21 people found the following review helpful By shelfishness on February 19, 2013
Format: Paperback
I know that I often get stuck in a rut when it comes to making dinner, and as a dairy-free vegetarian, I have explored a vast number of vegetarian and vegan cookbooks to help inspire me. Because I was curious about how I could make some Chinese options for dinner (I rarely make Chinese food, but my husband was patiently hoping for some), I was eager to read The Chinese Vegan.
What I found was a decent collection of recipes that include appetizers, salads, noodle dishes and desserts. Some of the recipes were really good (Hunan Cold Sesame Noodles, Stuffed Apples with Sticky Rice and Dried Fruits, and Coconut Pumpkin Sticky Rice Pudding, for example). Others were just okay or nothing new (Grilled Sesame Asparagus and Pantry Lo Mein, for example). Some of the recipes involved ingredients that were a bit hard to find in my area (vegetarian mock duck and frozen Chinese pancakes, for example). While Klein takes the time to outline a number of alternatives, not all recipes have these options (for example, instead of using vegetarian oyster sauce, you can use mushroom soy sauce).
The recipes aren't really quick (they are centered around fresh ingredients, so they definitely take their time), but they could easily be done on a weeknight. A number of the flavor combinations are really unique (take the Mixed Mushroom Stir-Fry with Tofu, Green Apple, and Jasmine Tea Leaves), so this book is not for people who lack an open mind. My favorite section was the dessert section because most of those were original and truly unique to me, but there are gems in the other sections as well.
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