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The Christian Mind: How should a Christian think? Paperback – February 1, 2005


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Regent College Publishing (February 1, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1573833231
  • ISBN-13: 978-1573833233
  • Product Dimensions: 8.1 x 5.5 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #206,982 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

HARRY BLAMIRES is an Anglican theologian, literary critic, and novelist. Now retired, he served as head of the English department at King Alfred's College in Winchester, England. Blamires started writing at the encouragement of C. S. Lewis, his friend and tutor. The Christian Mind, his best-known work, has been used as a textbook at hundreds of bible colleges and seminaries around the world. He is also the author of The Bloomsday Book: A Guide through Ulysses and A Short History of English Literature, among many other works. --This text refers to the Audio CD edition.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Dr. David Steele on October 24, 2011
Format: Paperback
My uncle Dwight gave me this book almost twenty years ago. I'll never forget what he said when he handed it to me: "Only real men can read this book." Whether it was meant to motivate or amuse, I read it with a vengeance. This is my third time through.

Blamires thesis is clear throughout the book: "There is no longer a Christian mind." An interesting proposal, given the original publishing date of 1963. But the facts outweigh any contrary argument. The author notes, "And we have emptied our brains of Christian vocabulary, Christian concepts, in advance, just to make sure that we should get fully into touch. Thus we have stepped mentally into secularism." We live in a post-Christian era. This much is certain. The frightening reality is that some Christians understood this in the 1960's. Many Christians today simply have no comprehension of the Christian mind.

In part two, the author suggests what the Christian mind should look like. He delineates six marks of the Christian mind which include:

1. A supernatural orientation.

2. An awareness of evil.

3. A conception of truth

4. Accepts the notion of authority

5. Has a concern for the person

6. Has a passion to live life to the glory of God.

The Christian Mind should be celebrated for its analysis of culture and its allegiance to the Word of God. Like Francis Schaeffer, Blamires is in touch with the barriers to Christian thinking. While his concerns originated in 1963, they continue to reverberate almost fifty years later.

The point my Uncle was trying to make is this: Real men think Christianly. Real men live according to truth.

"The Christian mind is the prerequisite of Christian thinking. And Christian thinking is the prerequisite of Christian action." - Harry Blamires, 1963

[...]
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Joseph McBee on December 31, 2010
Format: Paperback
This book has one central argument and that argument is hammered home in expert fashion in every chapter. The author claims that there is no longer a truly Christian way of thinking about life and culture and politics and every sphere of our existence. The Christian mind has been replaced with the secular both in the Church and in the world. His viewpoint is difficult to argue with because his explanations and observations are spot on. The book was written in the early 60's but it not only predicts our current cultural state, its answers are still relevant.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By W. Thomas Dodge on April 8, 2008
Format: Paperback
The book is marvelous. One can debate his thinking, but that's what he invites the reader to do. Although the book was written in the 1960s, it's relevant today. What's our world-view regarding matters outside of morality and church? One will be surprised to find that perhaps they're as secular in their thinking as their neighbors. How do we think about things of culture and politics? It's well worth the read.
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