The Claim 2000 R CC

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(60) IMDb 6.5/10
Available in HD
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A prospector sells his wife and daughter to another gold miner for the rights to a gold mine. Twenty years later, the prospector (Peter Mullan) is a wealthy man who owns much of the old west town named Kingdom Come. But changes are brewing and his past is coming back to haunt him. A surveyor (Wes Bentley) and his crew scouts the town as a location for a new railroad line and a young woman (Sarah Polley) suddenly appears in the town and is evidently the man's daughter.

Starring:
Peter Mullan, Milla Jovovich
Runtime:
2 hours 2 minutes

Available in HD on supported devices.

The Claim

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Product Details

Genres Drama, Western, Romance
Director Michael Winterbottom
Starring Peter Mullan, Milla Jovovich
Supporting actors Wes Bentley, Nastassja Kinski, Sarah Polley, Shirley Henderson, Julian Richings, Sean McGinley, Randy Birch, Tom McCamus, Frank Zotter, Artur Ciastkowski, Barry Ward, Karolina Muller, David Lereaney, Valerie Planche, Grant Linneberg, Jimmy Herman, Marie Brassard, Phillipa Peak
Studio MGM
MPAA rating R (Restricted)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Rental rights 24 hour viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

It really drew me in wanting to watch the movie to the very end.
Radiant Smiler
It has the romance, the action and suspense, the scenery, the storyline is great....The actors and actresses are great and talented.
Alyce Silva
Indeed, it often feels like a film whose few strengths have little to do with the director.
Trevor Willsmer

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

23 of 24 people found the following review helpful By G P Padillo VINE VOICE on November 9, 2004
Format: DVD
One of the most remarkable adaptations of a literary work I've seen. Frank Cottrell Boyce completely changes Thomas Hardy's classic The Mayor of Casterbridge - and actually betters it lifting it from its original setting and tailoring it into a tale of the American West during the Gold Rush. Some of Hardy's holes hold (predictable) difficulty for many modern readers, but Boyce's western retelling fills them in and lends strong plausibility. (There's a tad too much "faint, fall ill and die" for me in the Hardy original). Some have complained that Boyce went too far - but this is a movie "based" on the book not claiming to be a faithful retelling.

Director Michael Winterbottom proves to have an enormous eye emerging in bold style at once stylized and natural. He brings us here images that, once seen, burn, linger and haunt forever be it a Victorian mansion hauled across the frozen plains or a horse's immolation as on fire it gallops across the screen.

Winterbottom's cast is a strong one - none remaining as they initially seem, each changing before our eyes. Kinski, first strong and bitter gives one of her most tender heartbreaking performances, Wes Bentley, likeable and promising becomes petty and meddlesome. Milla Jovovich serves up, predictably, hearty and hot, yet more delicate than she would like to appear.

In all of this Peter Mullan's Daniel Dillon is the focus and the fulcrum by which the story hinges. He is never less than masterful. To see him early on nearly ravaged by youthful greed then watch him in age yearn for salvation that may never come or come too late, one cannot help but be riveted by his endeavor to make up by his plight and his attempt to change it.

The Claim is a remarkable film which, while it may take a bit of time to warm up to, burns its own unique reward in a way few modern Hollywood films can.
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16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Flight Risk (The Gypsy Moth) VINE VOICE on November 5, 2006
Format: DVD
This is the West as I imagine it actually was, rough, unrefined, and brutal. Similar in tone to DAYS OF HEAVEN, another bit of American history, THE CLAIM is told in unsentimental bleak fact; nobody is spared, and there are no real winners except the railroad.

Daniel Dillon arrives in the wilds of Northern California during the gold rush with his wife and infant daughter in hopes of making a fortune in the gold fields. They arrive at a claim shack, cold, hungry, and out of hope and are taken in by the claimer, and in short order, Dillon unsentimentally sells his family to the lonely miner for the claim. The wife, Elena, aware that she has little say, goes with her new master, but does not close the door on Dillon.

Years later, we find that Dillon has made a go of things with his claim; he has built a town called Kingdom Come, wrested out of the mountains virtually by himself, a rough-and-ready place without amenities beyond the ubiquitous saloon and whorehouse to supply the miners. A survey crew appears; negotiations are begun to possibly bring the newly-constructed railroad through Kingdom Come and establish Dillon as the baron he envisions himself to be. The survey crew brings with it, however, a nasty shock for him; his erstwhile wife and now-grown daughter - who is unaware that Dillon is her father. Elena - the wife - is dying; she has come back to make some sort of arrangement with Dillon, as the man she was sold to has died and left her destitute, and she wants to provide for her daughter, the unlikely-named Hope. Dillon, on seeing her, realizes suddenly that his ambitions have left him hollow; his closest association is the madam of the town bordello, who loves him, but who he has no intention of marrying.
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By PianoMom on December 7, 2002
Format: DVD
If, as another reviewer said, you're looking for big blasts, action and a superficial script that has nothing to reveal then get yourself something else. This film is beautiful from start to finish. The acting is superb and contained, not overly dramatic...half of the dialogue is in the character's faces and gestures and not in the words they speak. Sarah Polley's performance as the introverted young girl who lives through the most painful years of her young life is outstanding. Shot in British Columbia (supposed to depict the Sierra Neveda Mountains), the scenes are breathtaking (particularly on a large screen) and cold, very very cold. The story will leave you weeping (at least it did me), and is even more affecting because it is all so understated. Not for those who want happy endings or who can't sit through serious drama. This is acting and cinematography at its best.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By James Snively on February 25, 2002
Format: DVD
Quite simply, "The Claim" is the best film I've seen thus far in the young millennium. A dark, Shakespearean tale of retribution, it is in fact a transposition of one of British author Thomas Hardy's greatest novels, "The Mayor of Casterbridge," to the 19th Century American West. It is aimed at literate viewers whose attention span is longer than that of a golden retriever. WARNING: The subtlety and slow pacing of this film render it potentially lethal to anyone who likes auto racing, pro wrassling, and/or "Armageddon"!
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By John D. Olsen on October 16, 2002
Format: DVD
I just stumbled across this movie on cable and was pleasantly surprised. It does owe it's look to the classic "McCabe and Mrs. Miller", but I find no fault with that. A naturalistic movie with a gritty tone, a measured pace and a matter of factness about it. I loved the look at this high Sierra frontier town and it's denizens. Movie viewers weened on a steady diet of pyrotechnics and CGI might want to skip this one and revel in the MTV masturbations of something like "3000 Miles to Graceland" They won't enjoy this as evidenced by other reviewers considering this a bore. If you don't mind an atmospheric movie and don't need Al Pacino chewing the wallpaper to think that acting is going on, then you might just enjoy this melancholy western epic.
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