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The Claims of Kinfolk: African American Property and Community in the Nineteenth-Century South Paperback – September 22, 2003

ISBN-13: 978-0807854761 ISBN-10: 080785476X

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The Claims of Kinfolk: African American Property and Community in the Nineteenth-Century South + The People and Their Peace: Legal Culture and the Transformation of Inequality in the Post-Revolutionary South
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Product Details

  • Series: The John Hope Franklin Series in African American History and Culture
  • Paperback: 192 pages
  • Publisher: The University of North Carolina Press (September 22, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 080785476X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0807854761
  • Product Dimensions: 9.4 x 6.3 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #324,219 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

The Claims of Kinfolk makes a fine, original contribution to comparative nineteenth-century African American history. I'm particularly grateful for Penningroth's economic analysis of slave property in materia as well as cultural and personal terms. He opens up our narrow assumptions about the lives of enslaved and emancipated people, in both the New and Old Worlds. (Nell Irvin Painter, Princeton University author of (Southern History across the Color Line) -- Review

Book Description

"Provides a provocative analysis of African-American property. . . . Breaks new ground and enlivens old debates. . . . Will require historians to rethink their assumptions about the social and economic history of the South and African Americans in the nineteenth century."--Georgia Historical Quarterly

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Tom Ginsburg on December 1, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Besides being a major new window onto African-American history, this book recasts our understanding of property and its relationship with state power--reminding us that ideas about property come "from below". a stellar achievement!
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By Ronald J. Gerts on August 16, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I bought this book after meeting the author and discussing his work with him. It's a great book. It won a well-deserved McArthur Genius Award for Penningroth. His work is based on original research into documents in the National Archives that have been overlooked for decades. He uses the records of property claims made by slaves after the civil war to learn about the African-American family. Very readable, too.
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