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The Climb (Everest #2) Paperback – September 1, 2002

42 customer reviews

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Magic Tree House 1-4
Magic Tree House 1-4
The adventures that started it all. Newly bound together, the first four books of the fan-favorite chapter-book series are the perfect introduction to the Magic Tree House series. Paperback | Kindle book | Magic Tree House series

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Gordon Korman is a force of nature." (Quill and Quire) "Everest [The Contest] opens a trilogy that is bound to get a few teenagers to the top of the world." (The Globe and Mail) --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Gordon Korman is the author of The 39 Clues Book 2: One False Note, which debuted at #1 on the New York Times bestseller list, and The 39 Clues Book #8: The Emperor's Code. Gordon has written more than sixty books for kids and young adults, including Zoobreak, Swindle, and Son of the Mob, as well as the On the Run series and the Island, Everest, Dive, and Kidnapped trilogies. A native of Ontario, Canada, Korman now lives with his family in Long Island, New York.

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Product Details

  • Age Range: 8 - 12 years
  • Grade Level: 3 - 7
  • Lexile Measure: 710L (What's this?)
  • Paperback: 160 pages
  • Publisher: Scholastic (September 1, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0439405068
  • ISBN-13: 978-0439405065
  • Product Dimensions: 7.8 x 5.2 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (42 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,091,369 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Gordon Korman has written more than fifty middle-grade and teen novels. Favorites include the New York Times #1 bestseller The 39 Clues: One False Note, The Juvie Three, Son of the Mob, Born to Rock, and Schooled. Though he didn't play football in high school, Gordon's been a lifelong fan and season ticket holder. He says, "I've always been fascinated by the 'culture of collision' in football and wanted to explore it-not just from the highlight films but from its darker side as well." Gordon lives with his family on Long Island, New York.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

19 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Rebecca Herman HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on July 24, 2002
Format: Paperback
Dominic Alexis's older brother Chris is one of the best young mountain climbers out there. He's sure to get to compete for a spot in the youngest expedition to ever climb Everest. But Dominic is just thirteen, and while he's a decent climber, he'd never get picked. At a "boot camp," a group of kids, mostly expert climbers, but a few that won a contest sponsored by an energy drink company, will test their endurance to prove themselves worthy of climbing Everest. Dominic determines to win the contest -- and he does, meaning he can go with Chris. He never even dares hope he could get to climb Everest, but he at least wants a chance to learn, compete, and have fun. At camp in the Colorado mountains, the teenagers are given tests of endurance and skill to determine which four of them will be selected for the expedition. But will the winners be prepared for what is ahead? I highly recommend this new series to readers who enjoyed Gordon Korman's previous adventure trilogy, Island.
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10 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Nepal Writer on September 26, 2011
Format: Paperback
I applaud the author for writing about a subject I love.I used to lead treks to the Everest Base Camp and have long and wonderful relationships with Sherpas. I wrote about them in Beyond the Summit. Korman obviously did some research on the subject. I just wish he had done a better job. There are so many glaring errors in the book and implausible situations. In the opening, he refers to yaks being everywhere in Kathmandu at an elevation of about 4,500 feet. There are no yaks in Kathmandu. They rarely venture below about 11,00 feet.

The biggest problem is the age of the characters, especially the thirteen-year-old Dominic. Nepal has a very strict minimum age requirement for issuing permits to climb Everest, so strict in fact that they would not issue a permit for the son of a famous Sherpa climber this year. So the entire premise of these young teens climbing doesn't work from the beginning. The book was published in 2002. In 2010, a thirteen-year-old set the record as youngest to summit. He had to climb from the Northern side in Tibet because Tibet had no minimum age. After much adverse reaction from the climbing community, Tibet instituted a minimum age of eighteen. A character name Ethan is in the book as the youngest to climb Everest. In reality, no such person exists.

They fly to Lukla for two hours in a helicopter standing up and holding onto a strap. Wrong. It takes 35 minutes to get there. Small planes make the flight. I did fly into Lukla in a Russian helicopter in the early 90's. We did not stand. We sat along the sides with cargo down the center.

Dominic is the hero of the book, and here's where the whole story becomes outlandish. First of all, he's referred to as the shrimp, youngest and smallest of the group.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Leeanna Chetsko VINE VOICE on April 4, 2010
Format: Paperback
Everest #1: The Contest, by Gordon Korman

An athletic company is holding a contest to sponsor the youngest climber ever to summit Everest, the highest mountain in the world. "The Contest" follows several young hopefuls as they compete for a place on the four person team.

Book one in an action-packed trilogy, "The Contest" is quick, decent read. My main complaint is that Korman uses several climbing terms and equipment pieces that he doesn't explain until the end of the book, if at all. For example, I knew what crampons were, but I don't think it's a common term.

The story isn't told from the viewpoint of any one character; and several of the characters are cliches: there's the young kid, the mean kid, the kid who doesn't want to be there, the adrenaline junky, etc. "The Contest" is still a good story, though, and I enjoy these types of stories because they introduce me to a new world or new activity that I was previously unfamiliar with.

The entire Everest trilogy is best for readers who are interested in mountain climbing, competition, or just learning about something new.

3/5.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By William S. Oetting on July 2, 2007
Format: Paperback
This is a children's series that doesn't try to talk down to kids. Instead, these books introduce new terms and techniques from the sport of climbing that even many adults have not come in contact with. This series does not try to make reading easy. It focuses more on the story and the adventure. I do have complaints about the series, like the fact that it is a series. The beginning of books two and three both have to recap what has occurred to that point in the story. Just make it one book so that you can have the flow of the story continue with out forcing the reader to reread. It also seems questionable that anytime the team of boys goes anywhere they are faced with a major problem. Yet, I understand that these were written for kids. Together this series cannot be as powerful as Harry Potter, but will help kids know the fun of reading. I can't wait to go climbing in the snow.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on February 8, 2007
Format: Paperback
The author of the book I read is Gordon Korman. The title of the book is Everest. The type of book that Everest is historical fiction.

In this story several kids train to become part of a team to climb Mount Everest. They go through hard and extreme tests of their climbing abilities. At different times some of the climbers are cut from the team until there four left. Cap Cicero is the team leader. E first chosen at first are Ethan, Chris, Bryn, and Perry. But Ethan drops out. Who takes his place?

The book is very interesting. It made me want to keep reading to find out what was going to happen next. It is best suited for people who like to read suspence books and adventure.
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