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The Code for Global Ethics: Ten Humanist Principles Hardcover – April 27, 2010


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 300 pages
  • Publisher: Prometheus Books (April 27, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1616141727
  • ISBN-13: 978-1616141721
  • Product Dimensions: 0.9 x 6.2 x 9.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,514,607 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Dr. Tremblay offers not just armchair philosophizing, but solid, historical argument and proposals for integrating humanist philosophy into both our everyday lives, and our social institutions. Policy makers, and laypersons alike should heed Tremblay's account of humanist principles, for in them lies a path to greater peace, tolerance, and societal progress." --David Koepsell, JD, PhD, former executive director of the Council for Secular Humanism, and assistant professor of ethics at the Delft University of Technology

"Dr. Tremblay points out in The Code for Global Ethics that we need to abandon selective moralities and move to a higher plane in which all members of the human family are treated equally as persons. Rodrigue Tremblay eloquently defends this form of rational humanism." --Dr. Paul Kurtz, Founder and Chairman, Center for Inquiry.

"The Code for Global Ethics represents a valuable and indispensable guide through the complexity of modern life and moral issues facing us every day. It offers a natural and far superior alternative to traditional religious moralities." --Marian Hillar, MD, PhD, professor of philosophy/religious studies, and editor-in chief and founder of the Essays in the Philosophy of Humanism.

"The principles proposed by Dr. Tremblay are dignity and equality, respect for life, tolerance and openness, sharing, anti exploitation, reason, ecology, peace, democracy and education. -This is a timely book to read." --Daniel Baril, Canadian anthropologist and author.

"Tremblay's ten principles provide us with a rational jumping-off point toward a new society no longer exploited by the power elites of church, state, and business." --Victor J. Stenger, author of the New York Times bestseller, God: The Failed Hypothesis.

About the Author

Rodrigue Tremblay (Montreal, Quebec, Canada) is a prominent Canadian-born economist with a PhD from Stanford University. He is a former Woodrow Wilson fellow and a Ford International Fellow. He is now professor emeritus at the University of Montreal, after having occupied the positions of full professor of economics at the University of Montreal, president of the North American Economics and Finance Association, president of the Canadian Economics Society, and advisor to numerous organizations. From 1976 to 1979, he was minister of Industry and Commerce in the Quebec government. He is presently vice-president of the International Association of French-speaking Economists. Professor Tremblay has written thirty books dealing with economics and finance, some also tackling moral and political issues.

More About the Author


Professor Rodrigue Tremblay is a graduate of Stanford University where he obtained an M.A. in Economics (1965) and a Ph.D. in Economics (1968). He is a former chairman of the Department of Economics at the University of Montreal. He is also a former president of the North American Economics and Finance Association, a former president of the Canadian Economics Society and a former vice-president of the International Association of French-speaking economists. Dr. Tremblay has also served as Minister of Industry and Trade in the Government of Quebec, from 1976 to 1979. He has also served as a member of the Committee of Dispute Settlements of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). He is a member of the Quebec Humanist Association. Dr. Tremblay has published 29 books. His previous book "The New American Empire" was published in English, in French under the title "Le nouvel empire americain", and in Turkish under the title of "Yeni Amerikan mparatorlu>u". In 2004, Dr. Tremblay was awarded the prestigious Condorcet Prize of political philosophy.

Customer Reviews

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I learned a lot reading it.
A Reader
Tremblay makes clear that "humans are social animals, and human interaction is a requirement for survival," and that means acting reciprocally or better, empathically.
Gastongravel
As a humanist, Tremblay is highly critical about religions' rigid morality and the role that superstition plays in religious dogma.
F. March

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I bought this book on the recommendation of Pierre Cloutier in Quebec, and very deliberately as the first book to read on 22 December 2012 as Epoch B begins (see graphic above with book cover).

Across the entire book are what I now call E to the 5th: Empathy, Ethics, Ecology, Education, and Evolution. The bottom line of the book is clear: abandon religions as selective (and generally exclusionary) arbiters of morality, each severely hypocritical in having one morality for insiders and another for "others" (infidels, shiksas, whatever the name, moral disengagement is the rule and genocide is often the result).

When addressing really important books, I read the notes, bibliography, and index first. The notes are a second book -- these are not normal cryptic notes, each note is a short exposition, and any reading of the book is incomplete with a reading of the notes. The bibliography is extraordinary, and my attention was immediately drawn to the authors honored with three or more books being cited: Karen Armstrong, Mario Bunge, Charles Darwin, Richard Dawkins, A.C. Graylink, Robert Ingersoll, Immanuel Kant, Hans Kung, Paul Kurtz, John Rawls, Peter Singer, Baruch SPinoza, E. O. Wilson, and Robert Wright. Among them Kurtz, Singer, and Wright are central. Roughly 1,000 books are listed by title in the bibliography.

I am an intelligence professional far removed from the traditional world of secrecy and totally focused on public intelligence in the public interest.
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12 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Gastongravel on April 7, 2010
Format: Hardcover
I found this book to be a fantastic breakthrough as a way to present humanist ethics. The book is both revealing and extremely informative. It is well written, clear, concise, and persuasive. The author thoroughly investigates what humanism is all about and how it presents a superior worldview and ethics to solve human problems on an increasingly shrinking planet. --Humanism is not a religion without a god. It is a positive, rational, practical, generous and ethical philosophy of life.

In "The Code for Global Ethics, Ten Humanist Principles", the author presents a humanist moral compass that is straight and worth following. This is done in three hundred pages of pedagogically clear prose.

Most humanists will greet such an accessible and jargon free presentation of the fundamental humanist principles at a time when humanist moral philosophy seems to be sorely needed. The book is not a book of philosophy proper, written for the specialist. It is rather a clearly written and easily readable demonstration for the nonprofessional reader that moral values are necessary for human survival in the long process of human evolution. That's what the author calls "the moral dimension" of things.

Tremblay makes clear that "humans are social animals, and human interaction is a requirement for survival," and that means acting reciprocally or better, empathically. Human morality is partly innate, partly a product of the long natural evolutionary process and partly learned. This is a distinction that the author clearly emphasizes when he writes, "human morality is both an intuitive phenomenon and a learned attribute of human behavior" (p. 25). Thus, the pedagogical tone that he adopts throughout.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Jan Czekajewski on May 13, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I found the book, "The Code for Global Ethics" quite interesting. It helped me to solidify my own opinions derived from my own observations of social behavior, economy and war in three countries, Poland under Hitler's and Stalin's yoke, Sweden under social democratic government, and over 40 years residence in the US, spanning from the time of the Vietnam War through recent experiences in "liberating" Iraq and Afghanistan. Book deals a lot with organized religion and depreciates its absolute value as a universal moral guidance. It deals mostly with three major religions, Christianity, Judaism and Islam. It is missing two other large religions, Buddhism and Hinduism. It is well-documented with 30 pages of references to other books and published papers. Being of similar frame of mind as the author, Rodrigue Tremblay, I found that his opinions confirm my own undocumented observations. Still I have a difference of opinion with an author who blames all misfortunes of war on religious zealotry. Two wars which I experienced as a small child were guided by deranged despots, Hitler and Stalin, who were nonreligious and who in fact proclaimed, that "religion constitutes opium for the masses" and should be eliminated. The idea of a better world order professed by author in "The Ten Principles for a Global Humanism" smacks of global ambitions to rearrange a world of hundreds of societies and nations into one guided by one "humanistic" culture. It is nothing new, as similar ideas had President Woodruff Wilson when creating the "League of Nations" after the First World War , which failed to prevent WW II. Or, the creation of the United Nations by Franklin D. Roosevelt which morphed into the battle ground of national politicians to justify, one more war under UN sanctions.Read more ›
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