The Collaborator and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $20.00
  • Save: $1.72 (9%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
The Collaborator: The Tri... has been added to your Cart
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by Reddwave
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: PLEASE READ - Nice solid book with some cover and edge wear, clean yellow pages, smooth spine. Tracking number provided.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Collaborator: The Trial and Execution of Robert Brasillach Paperback – November 1, 2001


See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$18.28
$9.90 $0.24

Reagan by H.W. Brands
Reagan by H.W. Brands
Check out the newest book by H.W. Brands. Learn more | See related books
$18.28 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. In Stock. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.


Frequently Bought Together

The Collaborator: The Trial and Execution of Robert Brasillach + Under a Cruel Star: A Life in Prague 1941-1968
Price for both: $32.80

Buy the selected items together
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 336 pages
  • Publisher: University of Chicago Press; First Edition. pb and hc published simjultaneously edition (November 1, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0226424154
  • ISBN-13: 978-0226424156
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.8 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,096,000 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

In this rare scholarly page-turner, Kaplan (a professor of Romance Studies at Duke and author of the acclaimed memoir French Lessons) employs the skills of a biographer and literary critic to flesh out the life of Robert Brasillach, a prolific and controversial French critic who was executed for treason, at age 35, after France's liberation from the Nazis. A fascist-leaning writer known for his defense of Nazi crimes (in 1942, he wrote his most incriminating phrase, "We must separate from the Jews en bloc and not keep any little ones"), Brasillach was the only distinguished writer put to death by the postwar French government. Kaplan looks closely at the trial itself and asks big questions about artistic accountability and Brasillach's legacy (he is, according to Kaplan, a martyr to Holocaust revisionists). Meanwhile, she doesn't shy away from the topic of Brasillach's homosexuality. She deftly describes his relationship with a German intellectual--a "Franco-German alliance expressed in miniature"--and looks at how the prosecutor used metaphoric allusions to Brasillach's homosexuality as a weapon against him in court. Everyone in the courtroom comes to life here: Kaplan examines the friendship between the prosecuting and defense attorneys as well as the jurors who convicted Brasillach. She also delineates the conflicted reactions of French intellectuals, many of whom criticized the verdict even though they abhorred Brasillach's beliefs. Throughout, Kaplan--whose father was a prosecutor at the Nuremberg trials--brilliantly demonstrates how a trial, and the lives of individuals, can serve as a metaphor for an entire nation. (Apr.)
Copyright 2000 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

From Library Journal

Although not as well known in the West as the trials of Marshal Petain and Pierre Laval, Brasillach's is in many ways more interesting for academics since he was a prominent author rather than a politician. As Kaplan (Romance studies and literature, Duke Univ.; French Lessons) vividly illustrates by using archival sources and interviews, Brasillach practiced denunciatory journalism while editor of a pro-Fascist newspaper and in contributions to other publications. He called for the expulsion of Jews from France, praised collaboration with Germany, and encouraged violence against Jews, resistance members, and the leaders of the previous Republic. While Brasillach was viciously anti-Semitic, that played little part in his trial, for he was tried, convicted, and executed for treason. (He was tried after the liberation of Paris but before the end of the war.) Brasillach has since become a hero for both Holocaust revisionists and followers of Le Pen. This study of his work, trial, and conviction is fascinating and well written. Recommended for academic collections and large public libraries.
-John A. Drobnicki, York Coll., CUNY
Copyright 2000 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Customer Reviews

This book sometimes seems rambling.
Stephen O. Murray
Kaplan has done an excellent job in presenting a relatively dispassionate report on the case, but the case itself is more a fluke than an historic watershed.
Riley P.
Good portraits of Albert Camus and Simone de Beauvoir.
Luc REYNAERT

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 26, 2000
Format: Hardcover
I was eager to read this book because there are hints about the Brasillach case in Kaplan's memoir, *French Lessons*. *The Collaborator* doesn't disappoint. It combines historical research with the drive of a legal thriller. And it raises interesting moral questions about the accountability of writers to society. I highly recommend it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
21 of 24 people found the following review helpful By phil watts on December 12, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Alice Kaplan's new book "The Collaborator" is a major work of literary and cultural criticism. In her investigation of the writings and the trial for treason of French fascist intellectual Robert Brasillach, Kaplan combines erudition with a sensitivity to the importance of writing and literature in modern France. The purge of 1944-1947 was a unique moment in French history: for the first time since the Revolution a group of writers was tried for having jeopardized the interests of the nation. The Brasillach case was exemplary. At the heart of Kaplan's book is not so much the story of the life and times of Robert Brasillach as the question of what it means when a nation decides to condemn one of its writers for treason. The great merit of "The Collaborator" is that Kaplan answers this question by looking in detail at the documents from the period. In her research she reads and analyzes Brasillach's articles in the collaborationist press, in particular those that appeared in the notorious and antisemitic weekly, "Je Suis Partout." She deftly guides the reader through the transcript of Brasillach's trial. In one of the most original parts of the book she identifies the four jurors at Brasillach's trial, describing in detail their personal history, their politics and their role in the Liberation of France. She is one of the few scholars to have looked at the Brasillach pardon file, submitted to de Gaulle in February 1945, and her conclusions about de Gaulle's reactions to the file are startling. Throughout, Kaplan is unfailingly honest about her discoveries and the parts of the trial that remain a mystery. Brasillach was a complex character who seems to have made up in racist diatribe what he lacked in literary skill. Kaplan's point is not to give us a psychobiography of the writer. Rather "The Collaborator" is a sober and compelling reflection on literature and the memory of World War II today.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Luc REYNAERT on August 31, 2002
Format: Hardcover
Brasillach was a political (anti-semitic, racist) commentator and novelist in France before and during WWII.
As we can read in his memoirs, he was intellectually seduced by the racist and nationalistic work of Charles Maurras (L'Action Française). He had probably homosexual tendencies.
After the war, he was condemned (3 against 1) for high treason and executed.
For me, the author proves convincingly that the trial was excessive and unfair - the Liberation courts were essential Vichy courts! Brasillach was guilty for his writing, but should not have been shot. There was no strict cause-effect relationship between Brasillach's words and the murders and deportations that did take place in France.
But I agree also with the author that with this trial there was much more at stake: free speech, the capacity of language to do real evil, the accountability of writers and intellectuals. It was a warning by the political power elite at that moment.
Good portraits of Albert Camus and Simone de Beauvoir.
A model study. Nearly every sentence in this book is supported by a reference.
It is a signing on the wall that this book was written by an American. The ghosts and demons of WWII are still not dead in Europe.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Frederick Hertz on June 5, 2000
Format: Hardcover
At a time when the issues of hate speech and political crimes are so pivotal, and where the treatment of "war criminals" in Bosnia, South Africa and elsewhere are so compelling, this is an excellent book for anyone who is concerned about how governments deal with advocates of hate in the political realm. The narrative is riveting, the issues are well laid out, and the story is dramatic and powerful. Kaplan tells an important story and she tells it beautifully and carefully. Whether or not you are interested in French modern history, this story will grab you and make you think.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
22 of 30 people found the following review helpful By John Barry Kenyon on April 22, 2000
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is an unusual book on France's purge of its collaborators during the German occupation. By focussing on novelist and critic Robert Brasillach, Alice Kaplan tells us as much about literature as about politics. By the standards of today, Brasillach's propagandist work is naive. His glorification of the Reich, for example in Je Suis Partout of which he was editor in chief until 1943, is hopelessly romantic (even managing to quote Virgil in support) and bore no relationship to the experiences of ordinary French people living under the occupation. He seems to have been part of a pro nazi, elite homosexual coterie who found in fascism an outlet for their love of uniforms and male bonding. Kaplan has explored in depth the trial records and notes that Brasillach's insistence on rambling on for days ensured his death sentence. He would have done better to have remained silent. It is argued that he has become a martyr for the extreme right in French politics, but this thesis not really stretched beyond references to John Marie Le Pen's admiration. One is left with the feeling that Brasillach, like Vidkun Quisling in another context, left a weaker legacy than he thought he would. The complete lack of photographs, apart from a blowup on the dust jacket, gives the impression this book will largely have a specialist readership.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
The Collaborator: The Trial and Execution of Robert Brasillach
This item: The Collaborator: The Trial and Execution of Robert Brasillach
Price: $18.28
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com