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The Collected Works of Karen Horney Hardcover – January 1, 1950


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Product Details

  • Hardcover
  • Publisher: W. W. Norton & Co.; First Edition edition (1950)
  • ASIN: B00CJ4HN6E
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

32 of 37 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 24, 2000
Format: Paperback
Although the importance of the work of Karen Horney is sometimes downplayed, this is one of the best books I have read in my life. Far from incomprehensible language and theories that seem much more far from reality that the ones they are supposed to apply to, this book is an easy read for everyone, and I could understand simple mechanisms that therapists take years to reveal. Karen Horney does not try to place sex as an explanation for everything that you do or think.
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By M. Barbieri on March 11, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
OK, so I'm one of those people who's had his life changed by Karen Horney's "Our Inner Conflicts" and "Neurosis and Human Growth". I had read both of those books several times and taken something new out of them each time. Since then I had moved on to other authors in my quest to understand myself (namely Carl Jung and Alice Miller). I figured that since I found NAHG much better overall than OIC, Horney had progressively gotten better and her earlier stuff wouldn't be worth reading.

Well, I was wrong. I had some time and decided what the hey, I'd read this book. This was her first shot at writing a book. And it's amazing. Her genius is quite apparent even in this early book. There were quite a few moments where I just had to grin and say to myself "I've missed you." This is Karen Horney, authentic as ever. There were a lot of connections that I made concerning some of the finer details of my neurosis, that I never made until reading this book.

She spends much of the book making a connection between anxiety and hostility, a connection that she did not make so explicit in her later books but which is very eye-opening. The chapter on guilt feelings was possibly my favorite; they are elaborated in a way I'd never seen before. Her brief discussion of perfectionism, amounting to a couple paragraphs, made me think that maybe that was the original core of my neurosis, as I was able to trace stuff she talked about to far earlier periods in my life than I ever had reading her other books

No, it's not her best book. And if somebody insisted they were only going to read one Horney book, absolutely I would recommend Neurosis and Human Growth. And if it were two, I'd add Our Inner Conflicts.

But if you're a Karen Horney fan who has not yet read this book, move your cursor to the right of your screen right now, and click "Buy now with 1 click". You won't regret it.
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16 of 19 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 29, 2003
Format: Paperback
Horney revolutionalized analysis. She found societal roots for neurotic behavior and detailed how the intrapsychic processes get projected onto others in a way that could be understood. She changed the language of psychoanalysis -- she made it make sense and so helped thousands and thousands make sense of their lives. Cognitive therapy really started here.
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