The Collector and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $16.95
  • Save: $3.16 (19%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 4 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
The Collector: David Doug... has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Used book in good condition. Thank you for looking at this book. There is a name/writing on the first pages but no other writing or highlighting. Has very little wear and tear on the cover.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Collector: David Douglas and the Natural History of the Northwest Paperback – August 3, 2010


See all 6 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$13.79
$8.30 $2.47

Frequently Bought Together

The Collector: David Douglas and the Natural History of the Northwest + David Douglas, a Naturalist at Work: An Illustrated Exploration Across Two Centuries in the Pacific Northwest + Sources of the River, 2nd Edition: Tracking David Thompson Across North America
Price for all three: $45.00

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Sasquatch Books (August 3, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1570616671
  • ISBN-13: 978-1570616679
  • Product Dimensions: 8.6 x 5.5 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (23 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #411,550 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Jack Nisbet’s brisk, thrilling accoun allows us to walk, ride, and paddle along with David Douglas, the tireless nineteenth-century Scotsman whose name is attached to Cascadia’s iconic fir. Nisbet takes us on the ultimate naturalist’s tour of a largely

About the Author

Jack Nisbet is a historian, teacher, and author focusing on the intersection of human history and natural history in the Pacific Northwest. His Sources of the River won the Murray Morgan Prize from the Washington State Historical Society. 

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
5 star
12
4 star
9
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
1
See all 23 customer reviews
The illustrated maps were a great addition as well.
Holly B
By way of introduction, I've read most of the biographical material on Douglas as well as his writings.
Dr.Science
I purchased this book for my husband and he enjoyed it very much.
Pat

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Dr.Science on March 6, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
By way of introduction, I've read most of the biographical material on Douglas as well as his writings. There have been six biographies written about him, and this is the best of the bunch. Here they are:

The first was by his friend and mentor, William Jackson Hooker, and was published soon after Douglas' untimely death under the title "A Brief Memoir of the Life of Mr. David Douglas, with Extracts from His Letters." This work is available free on the internet and I highly recommend it. It's brief, sympathetic, and hits the high points.

Perhaps because Douglas' journals went unpublished until 1914, and then were put out only in an expensive limited edition, he did not attract another biographer until 1947 when H.T. Hervey published "Douglas of the fir: a biography of David Douglas, botanist." This was an excellent work, and the later biographies repeat much material first presented by Hervey. It is long out of print and you will likely have to get it through a library.

The third Douglas biography is more of a curiosity than a work of reference; it contains much wild speculation that is unsupported or actually contradicted by the historical evidence, and overall seems to be an effort to turn Douglas' life into a pulp romance. Among other things it reveals that Douglas had a passionate affair with a dusky native lass on the shores of distant Gray's Harbor. You can read this and more in W. Morwood's Traveler in a vanished landscape;: The life and times of David Douglas.

Next up was
...Read more ›
3 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Linwood Laughy on March 7, 2010
Format: Hardcover
A fine read for anyone interested in Pacific Northwest botany, fur trade history, and/or -ethnography. Plant life appears as if on a spring walk in the countryside, along with fun and fascinating related information. Hudson Bay and other historical personages delight at the turn of a page or the floating a river -- folks like John Work, Jaco Finlay, Samuel Black, Donald McKenzie, Edward Ermatinger --all observed by David Douglas in their natural habitats as well. Forts Vancouver, Okanogan, Colville, Spokane House, and several others make their appearance, connected by exciting travel on the rivers of the Northwest. The ethnographer will enjoy as well the many bits of Indian culture sprinkled throughout the book. All of these delicious details are wrapped in the passion of Douglas' life wandering far-flung landscapes in search of botanical discoveries.

The author makes extensive use of supporting documents, especially Douglas' own journals. These journals impart to the book a steady pace, which sometimes begs for a bit of literary disruption. But again, a fine read, well researched and well written, and a welcome addition to any bookshelf.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By matthew berberich on January 8, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Excellent book for the naturalist. Tons of names in horticulture we use today of people who were alive back in David Douglas day. Fast easy read with poetic descriptions of the Pacific Northwest.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Harold Ochs on December 3, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
An excellent book for those interested in the flora and fauna of the northwest. Informative regarding the topography as well. Interesting reading. I hated to put it down to do other things.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Midwest Book Review on April 19, 2010
Format: Hardcover
THE COLLECTOR: DAVID DOUGLAS AND THE NATURAL HISTORY OF THE NORTHWEST surveys David Douglas's discoveries of hundreds of western plants and tells how the son of a stonemason who lived in a rural Scottish village became the premier botanical explorer of the Pacific Northwest. His early fascination with nature and botany and the moves that would led him to become a leading authority make for fascinating reading especially recommended for any natural history collection.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By aussie mom on March 9, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I have been an amatuer botanist for 2 decades. In Oregon you can't study plants without bumping into David Douglas's trail where ever you go. I always wondered who he was and what kind of adventures did he have while in the Pacific Northwest.

This book takes you on that adventure and gives you a look at the real person both his good and bad are told in a non judgemental way. I had a great time reading this book and I learned so much about him and the Pacific Norhtwest in the early 1800's.

The ending was such a surprise, I would recommend this book to anyone who is curious about our historical figures or just what was happening in the early 1800's.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Brad Allen on August 13, 2011
Format: Hardcover
"All will be reconciled, and we shall see no longer as 'through a glass, darkly,' the infinitude, the beauty, the harmony of nature. I must return to the volcano, if it is only to look-to look and admire".

These words came from David Douglas's writings towards the end of his short life and contrast to the head-strong plant collector, who on his first journey to the Northwest, would occasionally let his desire for fame contaminate his boyish zeal for the natural world. Jack Nisbet's biography uses Douglas's journals as well as very extensive research of all available material on Douglas and related history to not only tell his story but let us inside the man.

David Douglas's first journey to the Northwest occupies the first half of the book and I was amazed at the insight and look into the very heart of the man we get. Less than two decades after Lewis and Clark, Douglas goes to the same region and explores thoroughly throughout what is now Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and BC. When it came to the second half I was afraid that beautiful narrative and insight would be lost on learning that Douglas's journals were lost in a canoe accident on the Frazier River late in the journey. But Nisbet picks and prods the available literature, uses the context of Douglas's first journey, and delivers us a compelling story on his second journey to the Northwest, California, and Hawaii.

I was struck by David Douglas's passion for the out of doors; his love of plants, geology, and everything natural. There is something very modern about this man, something two centuries before his time. In the end, though, the most compelling thing is the depth of the man whose name is on the Douglas fir.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews