REf Dictionaries Atlas Language Guides Writing Guides Learn more
Buy New
$32.33
Qty:1
  • List Price: $33.95
  • Save: $1.62 (5%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Temporarily out of stock.
Order now and we'll deliver when available.
Order now and we'll deliver when available. We'll e-mail you with an estimated delivery date as soon as we have more information. Your account will only be charged when we ship the item.
Details
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
The Columbian Exchange: B... has been added to your Cart
Sell yours for a Gift Card
We'll buy it for $6.81
Learn More
Trade in now
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

The Columbian Exchange: Biological and Cultural Consequences of 1492, 30th Anniversary Edition Paperback – Deluxe Edition, April 30, 2003

12 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0275980924 ISBN-10: 0275980928 Edition: 30th

Buy New
Price: $32.33
41 New from $27.47 48 Used from $9.99
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback, Deluxe Edition
"Please retry"
$32.33
$27.47 $9.99
Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


Hero Quick Promo
Save up to 90% on Textbooks
Rent textbooks, buy textbooks, or get up to 80% back when you sell us your books. Shop Now
$32.33 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Temporarily out of stock. Order now and we'll deliver when available. We'll e-mail you with an estimated delivery date as soon as we have more information. Your account will only be charged when we ship the item. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

The Columbian Exchange: Biological and Cultural Consequences of 1492, 30th Anniversary Edition + Sweetness and Power: The Place of Sugar in Modern History
Price for both: $43.58

One of these items ships sooner than the other.

Buy the selected items together

Editorial Reviews

Review

?Crosby put ecological history on the map. His pioneering text has awakened, inspired, and challenged a generation of readers. It will, undoubtedly, become more relevant as the pace of global exchange increases.?-The Sixteenth Century Journal --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Book Description

The classic work that revolutionized how we understand the environmental and cultural impact of the European conquest of the Americas.

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Praeger; 30 edition (April 30, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0275980928
  • ISBN-13: 978-0275980924
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.7 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #103,718 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

5 star
83%
4 star
17%
3 star
0%
2 star
0%
1 star
0%
See all 12 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Although only a large essay, Columbian Exchange was a paradigm shift in how Western historians view biological exchanges between Old & New World after 1492. Besides the exchange in human (mostly African) slaves which was the intended 1st leg of a nefarious Triangular Trade cycle between Old & New Worlds, Crosby also examines the unintended consequences of food crops, pathogens, domesticated animals, and commodity crops (rubber, cotton, etc.)

It concerns not only the cash crops (tobacco, sugar,coffee, rubber, cotton).

It also suggests the effect of pigs & horses which readily adapted to the New World. Horses transformed many Amerindian cultures into horse-centered cultures.

Many Old World plants & animals transformed the Americas(and Africa). Unintended 'hitchhikers' like smallpox & flu had the effect of a genocidal pandemic upon native Amerindian tribes.

New World species, especially potato, once they gained acceptance in Europe, became a staple of the poor, (Ireland & Russia).

Not emphasized by Crosby, many exotic New World specimens were returned to the Old World by natural scientists and the idea of natural selection was devised based upon evidence & specimens gathered in New World by European naturalists (i.e., Darwin's studies of finches of Galapagos)

These are a few of the effects of the Columbian Exchange. Crosby's work changed the way that historians and scientists understand the Age of Discovery.
I read this book 'after the fact', having become familiar with the exchanges by secondary, later sources.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By M on November 8, 2006
Format: Paperback
Slim though it is, this is a powerful little book. This insightful study of the biological consequences of the great culture clash that began in 1492 changed the way I think about history and has proved to be a valuable reference. It is a must-read for anyone interested in anthropology, epidemiology, ecology or history.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Kiera on May 9, 2011
Format: Paperback
Alfred W. Crosby's Ecological Imperialism: The Biological Expansion of Europe, 900-1900 discusses the anomaly of European migration. European colonization of the so-called "Neo-Europes", in particular, is the focus of this work. Crosby argues that the reason for European success in lands, so different than their own, in the temperate zone can be attributed to biology. The temperate climates occupied by European forces across the globe were more accommodating than other zones for habitation, which Crosby explains is the reason that European settlements were able to thrive there. In addition, as well as causing, the European cultures to thrive, a biological occupation occurred; European plants, diseases, and species of animals invaded and supplanted the local lands. This combination allowed European colonialists--human, plant, and animal alike--to take control of the temperate zone and, as a result, the agricultural belt of the world.
The areas deemed "Neo-Europes" by Crosby are composed of populations of European ancestry, despite the distance from Europe, and produce the most food surpluses; these two facts are not coincidental. Although the nineteenth century saw mass emigration due to a variety of conditions, it was the Neo-Europes which were the most popular. Crosby explains this success in the temperate zones by European imperialists biogeographically, starting with an observation about the respective latitudes of European and the Neo-Europes. The respective latitudes lie in the temperate zones and share similar climates. Therefore, when European plants and animals were transported to the new lands, they found an environment which was able to sustain them; more so, it allowed them to thrive.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By J. Sims on October 8, 2012
Format: Hardcover
Crosby guest-lectured a class when I was in school at UT Austin 30 years ago. His ideas blew our minds.

A perspective I found mind-boggling was that the industrial revolution would not have been possible without the agricultural products from the new world. Corn, potatoes, etc., had the nutritional content needed for Europeans to leave farming for factory work.

I remember how some of my friends refused to accept Crosby's ideas. I think many folks continue to deny that imperialism is violent & harmful.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By D. McGraw on April 13, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
After being deluged in recent years with Jared Diamond's "Guns, Germs, and Steel" theory of history in books and on TV, its refreshing to go back to the original thinker. One only need consider the "Great Man" theory of history, and its utter inadequacy to account for the dynamics of old world meets new world history to realize how much history has changed and the seminal part in that change of this author and this book. Crosby shows that a knowledge of epidemiology and botany informs our history more than belief, culture, or technology. That the spanish slaughtered and enslaved in pursuit of gold, ignoring a harvest of potatoes and tomatoes; since valued much higher than all the gold ever mined, puts in doubt both any "great man" theories of history not to mention any "rational self interest" based economic theories. We're just now beginning to perceive the greater gifts of agricultural diversity that the native americans left us but we have rejected, possibly to our peril. The first flickers of recognition of the depths of their gift and sacrifice starts here. A book that's a joy to read and changes the way you see the world - more than one can reasonably ask of any book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Want to discover more products? Check out this page to see more: alfredo lopez austin