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The Coming of the Son of Man: New Testament Eschatology for an Emerging Church Paperback – August 21, 2012


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 282 pages
  • Publisher: Wipf & Stock Pub; Reissue edition (August 21, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1620324598
  • ISBN-13: 978-1620324592
  • Product Dimensions: 8.9 x 6 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #767,604 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Andrew Perriman currently works with Christian Associates International, exploring new approaches to missional church. He is the author of Speaking of Women: Interpreting Paul and edited Faith, Health and Prosperity. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Michael Thompson on October 16, 2008
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The greatest benefit from reading this book is that it seeks to establish biblical eschatology within the context of the original authors/hearers.

The greatest challenge from reading this book is that it seeks to establish biblical eschatology within the context of the original authors/hearers.

What I mean to say here is that it would be fairly easy, I suppose, to assume that Perriman's eschatological reading is bound to the experiences of the first century Jewish Christians and nothing more. In fact, some of the passing critiques I have heard about this book is just that - that everything for Perriman is dependent upon his preterist reading. After working through the book I would argue against such a reading as failing to grasp the overall thesis of the work, while at the same time be willing to concede that some of Perriman's conclusions are not as clear as one might hope for (leaving some of his argument open to the criticisms).

The primary thesis of the book is found in the belief that New Testament eschatology, which is rooted in Second Temple Judaism, which told an important story about the coming of the Messiah, must be read in its original context in order to be understood. This is key to understanding Jesus as an historical figure, and the only way in which we can properly understand the perspective of ancient Israel, the gospel accounts, or the early church. In fact, most biblical scholars (who aren't fundy kooks or left behind idiots) would most likely agree that any text in Scripture cannot mean for us today that which it could not mean for the original audience (although, it might be able to mean more). If we agree with this, then we are off and running to understand Perriman's work.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Daniel J. Levy on November 14, 2010
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Before reading this review, please note that this isn't exhaustive in nature. These, in particular, are things that stuck out to me (though there was much more that did) in the following chapters. This book is this and much more.

"Let us imagine first-century Judaism as a ship - a splendid but badly run ship in which the officers and crew mistreat the passengers and squabble and fight over who should have control of the vessel. Blinded by their obsessions and jealousies, no one on the bridge notices that she ship is drifting towards a ferocious eschatological storm. When one or two men raise the alarm, they are seized as trouble makers, brutally beaten, and thrown overboard. As the winds tear at the rigging and waves wash across the deck, a few brave souls decided to heed the warnings; they lower a lifeboat and take their chances on the rough seas. To the passengers and crew who stay on board this seems a reckless and disloyal move - and at times those clinging desperately to each other in the belly of the small boat, as it pitches and rolls, wonder if they have made the right choice. Some are swept overboard, some die from exposure and hunger. They cry out to the dark heavens, praying that the storm would cease. But they do not give up hope; they believe they have done the right thing. Then from a distance they watch in horror as the ship strikes rocks and sinks with massive loss of life - they are appalled, but they also feel vindicated. Eventually the wind drops, the waves subside. The lifeboat runs ashore on a sandy beach. They have come to the end of the end; they have survived. This is the beginning of a new age."

Andrew Perriman, in the final chapter of his book, The Coming of the Son of Man wrote the above parable to represent the crisis of first-century Judaism.
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4 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Dr. C. H. Roberts on August 6, 2008
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If I had the power to do so, I should compel every Christian to read this book. It is simply one of the best books on the subject of the prophetic ("second coming") passages in the New Testament. Focusing in Mattew 24, Mark 13, and Luke 21 and the Book of Revelation, Perriman presents a well written case for the past-fulfillment view of the events described in those verses. His use of analogies and illustrations were particularly helpful. This ia a great book...order it now!
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