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The Compelling Scientific Evidence for UFOs [Kindle Edition]

Erol Faruk Ph.D
3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)

Print List Price: $11.95
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  • Length: 146 pages (estimated)
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Book Description

Physical and chemical analysis of a glowing ring soil residue allegedly left behind by a UFO hovering above the ground is presented. The analysis results strongly implicate a genuine UFO to have been present and that it was exhibiting an unusual luminescence technology. An overview of the current UFO situation is also presented, along with a discussion of why scientific journals have been reluctant to publish the analysis and its data. The Foreword to the book is by Dr. Michael Swords, who has himself previously been involved with collating all other analysis data from this famous UFO case.

The author is a British born scientist from Turkish parentage. After receiving his B.Sc (Hons) in chemistry from Queen Mary College, London University, he stayed on to earn a Ph.D in the organic synthesis of unstable carotenoid pigments before moving to Oxford and Nottingham Universities to carry out postdoctoral research in other areas of chemistry. He then found long term employment as a pharmaceutical development chemist which led to him being named inventor and co-inventor of numerous patents awarded for commercially important processes. The author's early interest in astronomy indirectly led to his curiosity into the UFO phenomenon, and once he became adept in chemistry he was keen to use his expertise to uncover knowledge on the phenomenon if at all possible. This book is the result of that endeavour.

IMPORTANT NOTE: A first review of this book on Amazon.com has pointed to the fact that there was a microbiological presence (Nocardia) in the ring soil, as mentioned in a book by Vallee. The reviewer jumps to the conclusion that the ring has been caused by this microbiological entity, which has previously been classified as a fungus. For the benefit of those who are not using the Amazon.com domain I am posting here my comments that followed his review:

The reviewer makes reference to Vallee's find of Nocardia fungus in the ring soil. I myself (book's author) observed small clumps of fungal matter in the ring soil which is likely to have been the same material. However, the amounts present were TINY in comparison with the large quantity of water soluble organic substance in the soil. The overwhelming impression I gained during examination was that the fungal material had proliferated BECAUSE of the enriched organic content of the soil, and not vice versa! The reviewer fails to mention that the ring did not grow or change in shape with time that would be indirect evidence for a direct fungal cause for the ring. In his Foreword to the book, Michael Swords also refers to the renowned expert on fungal diseases, Dr. Hubert Lechevalier of Rutgers who also inspected the soil and concluded that the ring, "although containing some fungal elements as almost all soils do, was NOT the product of such an agency"! In other words, a cursory examination of the ring soil showing spurious fungal material is simply not adequate to automatically assume a fungal ring cause as the reviewer has proclaimed. He needs to be more critical in his assessment and examine the theory proposed in the book which adequately explains ALL the features of the ring, including even its elongation towards the wind direction on the night the event was reported!

Extra info:

Actinomycetaceae is a family of bacteria in the order Actinomycetales that contains the medically important genus Actinomyces. Actinomycetaceae comprises 3 potentially pathogenic genera :Actinomyces, Nocardia, Streptomyces. These organisms are closely related to the mycobacteria but were originally classified as FUNGI because they were thought to be transition forms between bacteria and fungi.

Quote from Vallee's book Forbidden Science: "An analysis of the white matter in the glowing ring left after the sighting disclosed the presence of a Nocardia fungus that seemed to have been stimulated by an unknown radiation."

BOTTOM LINE: The ring soil is NOT of fungal origin, but a chemical one!


Editorial Reviews

About the Author

The author is a British born scientist from Turkish parentage. After receiving his B.Sc (Hons) in chemistry from Queen Mary College, London University, he stayed on to earn a Ph.D in the organic synthesis of unstable carotenoid pigments before moving to Oxford and Nottingham Universities to carry out postdoctoral research in other areas of chemistry. He then found long term employment as a pharmaceutical development chemist which led to him being named inventor and co-inventor of numerous patents awarded for commercially important processes. The author's early interest in astronomy indirectly led to his curiosity into the UFO phenomenon, and once he became adept in chemistry he was keen to use his expertise to uncover knowledge on the phenomenon if at all possible. This book is the result of that endeavour.

Product Details

  • File Size: 1968 KB
  • Print Length: 146 pages
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
  • Publisher: Erol A. Faruk; 2 edition (July 10, 2014)
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services, Inc.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00LFNC6OE
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
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  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Lending: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #526,185 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I loved it! February 4, 2015
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
I thought the exchange with Seth Shostak was brilliant. I also loved the paper itself. This book is about the author trying to get his paper on the Delphos, Kansas case published in a mainstream science journal. He includes the email exchanges. One great part is the speculative paper published after in an academic journal and the author calling them on it. My message to Dr. Faruk, you will have the last laugh. Aliens do exist! This book adds to that proof. Thank you Dr. Faruk, Dr. Swords and Phyllis Budinger.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Format:Kindle Edition
I just finished this after reading a blog post on the Sarasota Herald Tribune site (http://devoid.blogs.heraldtribune.com/14686/careful-what-you-ask-for/). I am not a big consumer of ufo literature but I have had some interest in the topic and recently read Leslie Kean's 'UFOs: Generals, Pilots, and Government Officials Go on the Record'. It's a quick read and I think provides a good overview of the current state of affairs in the study of ufos. I found the description of the Delphos case and the author's scientific findings to be compelling. From the perspective of an engineer with an interest in ufos, I found the notion of this particular ufo using some kind of chemical to generate light pretty interesting. It seems fairly inefficient and impractical, which makes it kind of intriguing. The meat of the book is a record of the author's attempts to get these findings published in a mainstream scientific journal. The dialog between the author and the editors of various scientific journals is pretty enlightening, both in terms of the passion for the issue and the response from the scientific establishment. I did get the feeling that the author's stridency in his communications did little to help further his cause, but I appreciate his transparency in including the entirety of these exchanges. As I finished the book, my main thought was why not continue to pursue further analysis of the soil (assuming samples are still available)? Perhaps if there was enough data to replicate the chemoluminiscent material and it was sufficiently novel, there would be little standing in the way of greater notice in the scientific community. I realize that there may be insufficient time and or money for this, but there may be ways to move things forward such as crowdfunding.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Format:Kindle Edition
The author claims that a white substance found on the ground in Iowa, already identified by Jacques Vallee (1977:46) as the common soil-based pathogen Nocardia, was unidentifiable to him and thus extraterrestrial in origin. He makes this claim with no background in bacteriology, on the basis of a chemical analysis alone. The detrimental effects of Nocardia infection are presented as evidence of contact with an extraterrestrial substance. The author expresses disbelief that major journals such as Nature did not accept his paper for publication. Two stars because the author was kind enough to include the paper he submitted as an appendix. I was surprised that Vallee 1977 was not mentioned once, even though he claims that "a conclusive answer to [the hypothesis of biological origin] will not be possible until the soil compound has been identified". Buyer beware: this essay is rather poorly formatted.

Reference:

Vallee, Jacques. 1977. "UFOs: The Psychic Solution". London: Panther.
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