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The Compleat Purge Paperback – October 22, 2013


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Editorial Reviews

Review

Trisha Low s been leaving us periodic notes about what we can keep of hers if she should happen to go off the deep end. She s also been leaving us her email password, her ATM PIN code, and an astonishing amalgamation of amatory fiction, IMs, craft patterns, magic spells, and film noir in which every romantic interest is a MacGuffin. Low says her virtuosic appropriations owe less to conceptual poetics than to her adolescent days of punk vandalism. Never mind if this booty was shoplifted it s stunning, and I promise, you ll want to keep everything she gives you. --Barbara Browning

Trisha Low is always dying. Age, place, fictional rendering all are subsumed to an origin already negated. She and her doubles evacuate with unmoving horror their teenage mania, displacing it, emptying the identities about whom its despair circulates. Once, maybe, this Trisha Low generated bodily heat, ate breakfast, loved and desired. No more. The Compleat Purge razes its confessional charms like effigies, foreclosing Low s final vixi to her own secrets before they too are obliterated in time immemorial. He had gone from her sight, he had not lifted his bowed head, he had not looked back. --J. Gordon Faylor

Like hands reaching out from the grave in the final scene of Brian Di Palma's Carrie, Trisha Low s The Compleat Purge reaches out to beg the question: 'what's happened to the real Trisha?' In Low's epically eloquent new book, she hands us the keys to a crypt wherein identity is theorized as an act of para-suicide and girlhood a version of being buried alive. The Compleat Purge reframes Freud's infamous query: 'What do women want?' by breathing new life into shifting ideals of feminine identity, sexuality, and erotics before the culturally determined ones land us in a coma. --Kim Rosenfield

Trisha Low is always dying. Age, place, fictional rendering all are subsumed to an origin already negated. She and her doubles evacuate with unmoving horror their teenage mania, displacing it, emptying the identities about whom its despair circulates. Once, maybe, this Trisha Low generated bodily heat, ate breakfast, loved and desired. No more. The Compleat Purge razes its confessional charms like effigies, foreclosing Low s final vixi to her own secrets before they too are obliterated in time immemorial. He had gone from her sight, he had not lifted his bowed head, he had not looked back. --J. Gordon Faylor

Like hands reaching out from the grave in the final scene of Brian Di Palma's Carrie, Trisha Low s The Compleat Purge reaches out to beg the question: 'what's happened to the real Trisha?' In Low's epically eloquent new book, she hands us the keys to a crypt wherein identity is theorized as an act of para-suicide and girlhood a version of being buried alive. The Compleat Purge reframes Freud's infamous query: 'What do women want?' by breathing new life into shifting ideals of feminine identity, sexuality, and erotics before the culturally determined ones land us in a coma. --Kim Rosenfield

About the Author

Trisha Low is committed to wearing a shock collar because she has so many feelings. Remote controls are available at Gauss PDF, Against Expression: An Anthology of Conceptual Writing, TROLL THREAD and others. She lives in New York City.

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