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The Complete I Hate to Cook Book Paperback – February 1, 1988


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 384 pages
  • Publisher: Bantam (February 1, 1988)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 055327130X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0553271300
  • Product Dimensions: 1.2 x 4.2 x 7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,320,346 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

Do you approach a food processor as of it were a high-tech guillotine?

Would you rather hunt for a meal than cook it?

But, secretely, would you like to somehow, someway, and very quickly make a meal that would win you a standing ovation?

Cry no more. Here's great news for the three million people who bought Peg Bracken's classic I Hate To Cook Book and its two successors: Peg is back with her very best recipe tips and advice. In a text that is both highly informative and hilarious, she covers everything from shopping to diets to kids to parties to picnics to full meals, and more.

From the Inside Flap

Do you approach a food processor as of it were a  high-tech guillotine?



Would you  rather hunt for a meal than cook  it?



But, secretely, would you like to somehow,  someway, and very quickly make a meal that would win you  a standing ovation?



Cry no more.  Here's great news for the three million people who  bought Peg Bracken's classic I Hate To  Cook Book and its two successors: Peg is  back with her very best recipe tips and advice. In  a text that is both highly informative and  hilarious, she covers everything from shopping to diets  to kids to parties to picnics to full meals, and  more.

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Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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See all 13 customer reviews
So glad this is still in print.
A. Greenlee
I highly recommend you begin your Bracken odyssey with this book, and see where it leads you.
Polkadotty
This is usually what I give to newlyweds for a housewarming gift.
V. Taylor

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

46 of 47 people found the following review helpful By Polkadotty on June 30, 2004
Format: Paperback
Here's a woman after my own heart: she hates to cook and is unashamed to admit this. The manner in which Miss Bracken admits is rife with humour and finesse ~ plus she tosses into the bargain 180 quick, easy, housewife tested recipes (this book was published in the '60s ~ 1960 to be exact) that anyone can make, even those hostile toward kitchen environs. Miss Bracken's wit is peppery (note the food connotation), vinegary (ditto), and her prose is salted (!) through with references to classic literature, tidbits of common sense advice, and slams at 'pop' psychology (as hilarious then as it remains today). Here's a sampling of (some of) what you're in for with this read: 'The Leftover, or Every Family Needs a Dog'; 'Spuds and Other Starches, or Ballast is a Girl's Best Friend'; 'Potluck Supper, or How to Bring Water For the Lemonade'; 'Luncheon for the Girls, or Wait Until You Taste Maybelle's Peanut Butter Aspic'. In between the pages of these chapters you'll find recipes for such tasties as: 'Skid Road Stroganoff', 'Sub Gum Yuk', 'Oddment', 'Old Faithful', and, appropo for the era, 'Beetniks' (a nifty way of fixing shredded pickled red beets). If you catch a whiff of the droll and acerbic, you are quite correct. Peg Bracken is a jewel. Very popular in the Sixties and Seventies, she also published an Appendix to 'The I Hate To Cook Book', plus several other books including 'The I Hate To Housekeep Book', 'A Window Over the Sink', 'I Try To Behave Myself' (etiquette), 'But I Wouldn't Have Missed It For The World' (travel), and 'On Getting Old For The First Time'. In all of these, she never misses a beat, her timing is impeccable. The sort of woman you'd love to have for a friend or neighbour, especially when one runs out of sugar and can't find the car keys. I highly recommend you begin your Bracken odyssey with this book, and see where it leads you. Enhanced by Hilary Knight's warm and witty line drawings.
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29 of 29 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 16, 1996
Format: Paperback
Peg Bracken's book is for those of us who look at Martha Stewart
and want to bang our heads against the wall. Most of the
recipes create simple, "normal" food, in relatively small
amounts of time. Her advice is funny and straightforward.
The book is a pleasure to read, as well as to cook from.
I've had luck with all but one of the recipes I've tried -- the
one that "failed" came out okay, but my tastebuds gave it a
bad grade.

The best of the lot are "Sweep Steak." "Innocent Chicken," and
"Boeuf and Oeufplant," but there are still more that I'd like to
try out.

This book is especially helpful for people just starting to
keep house on their own; Peg Bracken's insights help keep a
light perspective on the entire domestic endeavor.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Chou Chou Renate on March 22, 2006
Format: Paperback
The "I Hate to Cook", full of witty wisdom that goes far beyond the kitchen. This book is worth buying for its humor alone, but the common sense advice and cooking directions/recipes are a real prize whether you are a nouveau cook or a skilled chef.

I believe the first "I Hate to Cook Book" was published back in 1960. As a new bride, I bought my own version in 1965, along with Craig Claiborne's "Herb and Spice" cookbook. These two books have stood well in the test of time and formed a solid base for my own culinary adventures.

"I Hate to Cook", is my favorite gift for people who are getting married, moving into their first apartment or place ,going to college, or whatever; this book is "the bomb", as the younguns now say. Not only does, "I Hate to Cook" give good culinary advice but the recipes are quick, easy and delicious. I have made most of the recipes in this book and they all work and taste good.

Give someone you like or love the gift of laughter and success in the kitchen. You may reap a whole lifetime of cookies and pot roasts.
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful By V. Taylor on July 18, 2002
Format: Paperback
This is usually what I give to newlyweds for a housewarming gift. The recipes are simple and fool-proof, the humor's great. On my 3rd copy - which isn't bad considering my mom gave me my first copy 15 years ago as a college gift. The only drawback is that it wouldn't go over too well with men - definitely written for women:( Otherwise my son would have his own copy by now. Get it...very much worth it. Oh yeah, the recipes TASTE good too, and check out that last-minute supper chapter.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 20, 1998
Format: Paperback
I have the paper back copy which was published in 1960 and I wouldn't give it up for anything. It is spattered and well used, but well loved. I have used the book so often, I have most of it memorised. It is terrific and funny and even if you LOVE to cook (like I do), you'll think this book extra special!
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 1, 1998
Format: Paperback
This book was a joy to read. I used to wake up my husband laughing and when he'd ask what I was reading and I'd say "a cook book", he'd doubt my sanity. I remember especially "slug-a-bed stew". It's great fun for all cooks, and most of all - lazy ones - like me!
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By Janster on September 8, 2010
Format: Paperback
This is one of my favorite cookbooks. I collect cookbooks---I've got the entire Time-Life Cuisines of the World series---but the only recipe I've made from the books is duck a l'orange, and I wasn't impressed with it. On the other hand, the turkey tetrazzini recipe in this book is something I'd serve anyone--and maybe make an extra one just for me to eat while I watch a chick flick. Nobody ever said that cooking for a family every day is fun, and she understood that; she doesn't effuse sentimentally over cooking for the family; she includes instructions as, "Now light a cigarette and stare sullenly at the sink," and, "It can be reheated in a double boiler until the cows come home, or the family does." She also has a bunch of funny tips for when you're making supper at the last minute, such as to open a bottle of wine and pour your husband a glass, because it will "make him think he's flying first class."

Her suggestion to eat a head of lettuce at the table as a semi-serious diet tip is something that I've never dared to try--but if anyone else does would they post here how it goes? I would like to know. I have used her advice to eat crudites before dinner and it works. 60% of Americans need to dispense with dinner and fill up on crudites.
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