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  • The Complete Liberty Singles (2-CD Set)
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The Complete Liberty Singles (2-CD Set)


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Audio CD, June 26, 2012
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$25.98 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details Temporarily out of stock. Order now and we'll deliver when available. We'll e-mail you with an estimated delivery date as soon as we have more information. Your account will only be charged when we ship the item. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.


Frequently Bought Together

The Complete Liberty Singles (2-CD Set) + Amazing Timi Yuro: The Mercury Years + I'm So Hurt - Her First Four Albums And More [ORIGINAL RECORDINGS REMASTERED] 2CD SET
Price for all three: $48.36

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Product Details

  • Audio CD (June 26, 2012)
  • Original Release Date: 2012
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Label: Real Gone Music
  • ASIN: B007ZIMB02
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #128,079 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Disc: 1
1. Hurt
2. I Apologize
3. Smile
4. She Really Loves You
5. I Believe (Timi Yuro & Johnnie Ray)
6. A Mother's Love (Timi Yuro & Johnnie Ray)
7. Let Me Call You Sweetheart
8. Satan Never Sleeps
9. I Know (I Love You)
10. Count Everything
See all 17 tracks on this disc
Disc: 2
1. Make the World Go Away
2. Look Down
3. She's Got You
4. Are You Sure
5. Gotta Travel On
6. Down in the Valley
7. Permanently Lonely
8. Call Me
9. Should I Ever Love Again
10. A Legend in My Time
See all 19 tracks on this disc

Editorial Reviews

Before Amy Winehouse, before Adele, there was the Little Girl with the Big Voice, Timi Yuro, the greatest white soul singer of the '60s, male or female. Previous Timi collections have featured after-the-fact stereo remixes or album tracks no collection has concentrated on the actual recordings that made her famous, the singles that took her to the charts in the '60s...till now! Here, for the first time, are the A and B-sides of all of the U.S. singles Timi cut for Liberty Records during her two stints with the label, featuring the original mono single mixes except for two tracks that were issued as 33 1/3 stereo jukebox singles, all fittingly remastered for CD release at Capitol Studios. Among the highlights are, of course, her recording of "Hurt" (also here in an Italian version in homage to Timi's heritage), a performance so deeply emotional and mature that viewers of Timi's first television performances were shocked to discover that she was (a) white, (b) a female (c) barely five feet tall and (d) a 20 year-old from Chicago; the Phil Spector production of "What's A Matter Baby (Is It Hurting You)", in which his studio bombast met its match in Timi's booming vocal, and the legendary Northern Soul single "It'll Never Be Over for Me/As Long as There Is You," which in its original 7" vinyl form trades for princely sums. And perhaps the most precious find of all is an unreleased single side, "Talkin' About Hurt," that presents Timi at her most rockin'. Co-Producer Ed Osborne pens notes that trace Timi's journey from Chicago to the charts along with a singles discography and photos. Remember, many of these songs have never been on CD and/or never in their original single mixes find out why everybody from Elvis to Morrissey counted Timi among their favorite singers.

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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See all 11 customer reviews
I treasure my newly purchased 2 album set.
Rick Cunningham
When people think of great, young female vocalists, names like Adele, Celine, Christina and even the late Amy Winehouse come to mind.
Boomerocity
Timi Yuro is without doubt the best blue-eyed soul singer ever!
Ann Marie Fiondella

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By hyperbolium on July 12, 2012
Timi Yuro was an anomaly in the world of 1960s soul - a small girl of Italian descent with a gigantic, hugely emotional voice. The opening notes of her million-selling 1961 debut single, "Hurt," suggest no less than Jackie Wilson with their power and vibrato, leaving listeners to momentarily wonder if they were hearing a man or a woman. She could sing more tenderly, but the biggest thrills in her catalog came from the sort of wrecking ball outbursts that Phil Spector helped capture on her subsequent "What's A Matter Baby." Barely missing the Top 10, this latter single is perhaps the single greatest kiss-off in the history of pop music; from it's opening drum roll to Yuro's derisive laugh after singing "I know that you've been asking `bout me," to the soul-crushing finale "and my hurtin' is just about over, but baby, it's just starting for you," this is a five-star kick in the teeth delivered point-blank to a deserving cad. Even the distortion on Yuro's voice connotes indignation so strong that the microphone should've stepped back.

Yuro's commercial fortunes never topped these two singles, but she continued to release fine albums and singles for Liberty throughout the rest of the 1960s. The bluesy choke in her voice suggested Dinah Washington, as did the string arrangements with which she was often supported. The material for her early singles was drawn in large part from pop standards, ranging from early century classics to Tin Pan Alley to the hit parade. As with her two biggest hits, songs of romantic discord and joy, such as the non-charting "I Know (I Love You)" and its Drifters-styled flipside, "Count Everything," provide the sort of material Yuro could really sink her teeth into.
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Tilak on July 10, 2012
Timi Yuro was a pint-sized Italian girl who had giant, soulful pipes.
Influenced by the blues and jazz singers she heard as a kid growing up in Chicago, she invested everything she sang with impressive emotional power.
Even when the material let her down, as it quite often did, she could turn a decent song into something spectacular.
She burst onto the scene in 1961 with an incendiary cover of Roy Hamilton's hit ballad "Hurt", which tore up the charts and established her as a vocal powerhouse.
This collection gathers up all her singles cut for the Liberty label between 1961 and 1964 (when she left the label due to frustration with their politics and selection of material for her to sing), and 1968 and 1969, when she briefly returned.
Unsurprisingly, the stand-out cut is "Hurt", but there are quite a few that nearly equal it. The girl group-meets-Drifters "Count Everything" is a great song and Yuro's vocal shows an unusual amount of nimbleness; "Satan Never Sleeps" is a weird little tune that she croons through like one of thejazz singers she so admired, and "I Ain't Gonna Cry No More" is a tough little girl group rocker.
Best of all is the amazing "What's a Matter Baby (Is It Hurting You)", which was co-produced by Phil Spector and features a vocal that equals anything Tina Turner ever did in its rawness and naked emotion.
Despite these high points, it's easy to see why she was upset at some of the label's choices of songs; her cover of "Smile" is schmaltzy at best, for example, and pairing with Burt Bacharach on "The Love of a Boy" is fine, but her fire is dimmed but Bacharach's production style.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By AvidOldiesCollector TOP 100 REVIEWER on December 1, 2012
The deep, raw and soulful tones of Timi Yuro (born Rosemarie Timothy Aurro Yuro in Chicago on August 4, 1940) were first heard on a national scale in summer 1961 singing Hurt, but before that she had been involved in a 1961 duet with Johnny Ray on I Believe b/w A Mother's Love as Liberty 55400. It failed to dent any charts, but then came Hurt in September which topped out at # 2 Adult Contemporary (AC)/# 4 Billboard Pop Hot 100/# 22 R&B as Liberty 55343. Even the flipside, a cover of the 1931 Bing Crosby hit, I Apologize, also charted at # 19 AC/# 72 Hot 100. Later that fall, her cover of Smile, written by Charlie Chaplin for his 1936 film Modern Times and a 1954 hit for Nat "King" Cole, got as high as # 9 AC, but just missed the Pop Top 40, settling in at # 42 in November as Liberty 55375, while the flip, She Really Loves You, checked in at # 93 Hot 100. Then came Let Me Call You Sweetheart, first a 1911 hit for The Peerless Quartet, which peaked at # 66 Hot 100 in February 1962 as Liberty 55410 b/w Satan Never Sleeps, followed by the failed single, I Know (I Love You) b/w Count Everything on Liberty 55432. All her releases to this point had the backing of the Belford Hendricks orchestra.

The Bert Keyes orchestra then backed her on What's A Matter Baby (Is It Hurting You?) which, b/w Thirteenth Hour, returned her to the R&B charts at # 16 as well as a solid # 12 Hot 100 in August 1962, both produced by Clyde Otis as Liberty 55469. Timi then closed out 1962 with The Love Of A Boy, this time backed by Burt Bacharach's aggregation, hitting the # 44 Hot 100 slot in December b/w I Ain't Gonna Cry No More as Liberty 55519.
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