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The Complete Maus: A Survivor's Tale[ THE COMPLETE MAUS: A SURVIVOR'S TALE ] by Spiegelman, Art (Author) Nov-19-96[ Hardcover ] Hardcover – July 3, 1904


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Hardcover, July 3, 1904
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Product Details

  • Hardcover
  • Publisher: Pantheon (July 3, 1904)
  • ASIN: B007SKCLY8
  • Product Dimensions: 9.5 x 6.5 x 1 inches
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #68,555 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

This book got me into graphic novels.
MadLando
This comic is so very well written, that certain times when I was reading it I felt that Vladek was my grandpa telling me his story in person.
C. D. Forehand
You have no idea, but this book is a beurocratic way of explaining a self reference to political warfare.
Paris Miles-Brenden

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By C. D. Forehand on December 29, 2012
This is a good compendium of a really good comic. It is a story of Vladek Spiegelman, a Jew, who is being interviewed by his son Art about his time just before WWII and his imprisonment in Auschwitz-Birkenau. This comic is so very well written, that certain times when I was reading it I felt that Vladek was my grandpa telling me his story in person. You really get to know both main characters on a personal level which just connects the story to your heart even more and draws you in to continue reading. Trust me, get the complete Maus, cause you will start reading and never stop.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By The Flashlight Reader on December 12, 2012
This was different from what I expected. I wasn't sure what I would be reading when I started this book. I knew Maus was a Holocaust story, but I didn't know what type of story it would be. Calling it a "contemporary classic of immeasurable significance" is an understatement. I think powerful is a better adjective. Heartbreaking. Captivating..... those would work too.

The people in the book were depicted as various types of animals which I was both disturbed by and thankful for. I found it very interesting that the author chose to depict his "characters" as animals. The dehumanization aspect was not lost on me-- afterall, isn't that what Hitler and the Nazis did to the Jews?

Given the subject matter, I'm not sure how I would have taken to this book if it had the detail that most graphic novels are known for. The drawings lacked facial expression and some detail, but the point was still made. I still cried when a baby mouse's head was smashed against it because I knew what the mouse represented.

One thing that I did find bothersome was the constant switching between the present and past. I could see it being confusing for some people. However, I thought it was important to show how the past events shaped the father into the person that he became as a survivor. It wasn't choppy per se, but some type of textual feature to indicate that the present was occuring would have been better I think.

Overall, given that this is such hard content to work with, I think the author did a nice job of sharing his father's horrifying experience in a tasteful way that might make learning about the Holocaust more accessible to future generations. The story was focused on one family's tale, yet it managed to tell about an entire nation.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Anna Bishop on March 2, 2013
This should be universally required reading. That this story is told in comics adds an irony that is haunting, while at the same time, thankfully, surreal. How do you convey the reality of this kind of history without overwhemling your audience? There are many books written about the Holocaust but few will really put you there moment by moment in pictures, whether describing the camps, the author's relationship with his father, or the love story so subtley captured within its pages.

A must read!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By alexacaesco on March 21, 2013
Spiegelman's Masterpiece

Holocaust is the type of word nobody wants neither to pronounce nor remember. However, Art Spiegelman, an American cartoonist and son of a polish-Jewish Holocaust survivor, seems to remind us through his masterpiece comic book, Maus, that the Holocaust is one of the events humankind will never forget. Maus, winner of the Pulitzer Prize, is not a simple book. It can be classified as a mixed of genres book as it is a narrative book, history book, comic novel, but also a memoir and autobiography, all condensed in two main parts. Part I, My Father Bleeds History, which is dived into 6 chapters, and Part II, And Here My Troubles Began, divided into 5, are carefully and intentionally well-structured. This is how, all sections fit together, even though there is a movement back and forth between the father-son relationship and the father's (Vladeck's) recall of his experience as a Jew in the Holocaust. This constant and unexpected switch fascinates and interests the reader with both the plot and author's method to communicate his message, which is his unique animal-drawing style.

With Nazis portrayed as cats, Poles as pigs, Americans as dogs, British as fish, Swedes as deer, French as frogs, and Jews as mice, Spiegelman depicts humans as animals to emphasize the relevance that the difference in race and nationality seemed to have back in Hitler's time. He certainly knows what he is doing and why he is doing it. As a result, the reader is allowed to connect the dots by simply relating the cat-mice dichotomy relationship with the Nazi-Jew one, and also the cat-dog, Nazi-Americans, cat-fish, Nazi-British, and other relationships.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By MadLando on November 7, 2013
Verified Purchase
This book got me into graphic novels. I highly recommend it as a first purchase into the graphic novel rhelm. The story is amazing and you will definitely fly through reading it. This is a nice collector's edition, which is ideal for anyone, like myself, who enjoys rereading favorite books down the road. The subject matter does not pull any punches and isn't for everyone.

It is a completely unique way of telling one of the hardest stories there is to tell. Highly recommended.
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