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The Complete Peanuts 1969-1970 (Vol. 10) Hardcover – October 19, 2008


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The Complete Peanuts 1969-1970 (Vol. 10) + The Complete Peanuts 1967-1968 + The Complete Peanuts 1971-1972 (Vol. 11)  (The Complete Peanuts)
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 325 pages
  • Publisher: Fantagraphics (October 19, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1560978279
  • ISBN-13: 978-1560978275
  • Product Dimensions: 6.7 x 8.6 x 1.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (21 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #154,945 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

In these strips, Caniff’s heady brew of adventure, comedy, and romance approaches perfection. Titular protagonist Terry Lee is growing out of adolescence, and he’s given a love interest in the Southern belle April Kane. While the focus remains on Terry and soldier of fortune Pat Ryan, Caniff keeps things fresh by introducing new supporting characters, notably, dashing pilot Duke Hennick and the ill-fated Raven Sherman. Soon real-life events would transform Terry from an exotic high-adventure tale into an equally thrilling wartime saga. Many aficionados feel that the just-prewar period represents the newspaper adventure strip at its peak. --Gordon Flagg

About the Author

Charles M. Schulz was born November 25, 1922, in Minneapolis. His destiny was foreshadowed when an uncle gave him, at the age of two days, the nickname Sparky (after the racehorse Spark Plug in the newspaper strip Barney Google).In his senior year in high school, his mother noticed an ad in a local newspaper for a correspondence school, Federal Schools (later called Art Instruction Schools). Schulz passed the talent test, completed the course, and began trying, unsuccessfully, to sell gag cartoons to magazines. (His first published drawing was of his dog, Spike, and appeared in a 1937 Ripley's Believe It or Not! installment.) Between 1948 and 1950, he succeeded in selling 17 cartoons to the Saturday Evening Post—as well as, to the local St. Paul Pioneer Press, a weekly comic feature called Li'l Folks. It was run in the women's section and paid $10 a week. After writing and drawing the feature for two years, Schulz asked for a better location in the paper or for daily exposure, as well as a raise. When he was turned down on all three counts, he quit.He started submitting strips to the newspaper syndicates. In the spring of 1950, he received a letter from the United Feature Syndicate, announcing their interest in his submission, Li'l Folks. Schulz boarded a train in June for New York City; more interested in doing a strip than a panel, he also brought along the first installments of what would become Peanuts—and that was what sold. (The title, which Schulz loathed to his dying day, was imposed by the syndicate.) The first Peanuts daily appeared October 2, 1950; the first Sunday, January 6, 1952.Diagnosed with cancer, Schulz retired from Peanuts at the end of 1999. He died on February 13, 2000, the day before Valentine's Day—and the day before his last strip was published—having completed 17,897 daily and Sunday strips, each and every one fully written, drawn, and lettered entirely by his own hand—an unmatched achievement in comics.

Mo Willems is an award-winning animator, illustrator, and author. His many books include the acclaimed children's books Knuffle Bunny and The Pigeon and Elephant and Piggie series.

More About the Author

Charles M. Schulz was born November 25, 1922 in Minneapolis. His destiny was foreshadowed when an uncle gave him, at the age of two days, the nickname Sparky (after the racehorse Spark Plug in the newspaper strip Barney Google).

In his senior year in high school, his mother noticed an ad in a local newspaper for a correspondence school, Federal Schools (later called Art Instruction Schools). Schulz passed the talent test, completed the course and began trying, unsuccessfully, to sell gag cartoons to magazines. (His first published drawing was of his dog, Spike, and appeared in a 1937 Ripley's Believe It Or Not! installment.) Between 1948 and 1950, he succeeded in selling 17 cartoons to the Saturday Evening Post--as well as, to the local St. Paul Pioneer Press, a weekly comic feature called Li'l Folks. It was run in the women's section and paid $10 a week. After writing and drawing the feature for two years, Schulz asked for a better location in the paper or for daily exposure, as well as a raise. When he was turned down on all three counts, he quit.

He started submitting strips to the newspaper syndicates. In the spring of 1950, he received a letter from the United Feature Syndicate, announcing their interest in his submission, Li'l Folks. Schulz boarded a train in June for New York City; more interested in doing a strip than a panel, he also brought along the first installments of what would become Peanuts--and that was what sold. (The title, which Schulz loathed to his dying day, was imposed by the syndicate). The first Peanuts daily appeared October 2, 1950; the first Sunday, January 6, 1952.

Diagnosed with cancer, Schulz retired from Peanuts at the end of 1999. He died on February 13, 2000, the day before Valentine's Day--and the day before his last strip was published--having completed 17,897 daily and Sunday strips, each and every one fully written, drawn, and lettered entirely by his own hand--an unmatched achievement in comics.

Customer Reviews

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These comics are so cute and funny and if you don't buy this book well that's the way it goes.
80s fan
Fantagraphics, the publishers of the series, have recently completed the amazing feat of reprinting the complete Krazy Kat Sunday pages.
ewomack
The late sixties and seventies are my favorite time period for Charlie Brown as Snoopy really comes into his own .
Grover Smith

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By take403 VINE VOICE on October 8, 2008
Format: Hardcover
This new edition will prove to be another classic 2 year period. Much of this volume wound up in You've Had It, Charlie Brown, You're Out Of Sight, Charlie Brown and You've Come A Long Way, Charlie Brown. Snoopy will continue his charade as the World War I Flying Ace (as pictured on the cover). Charlie Brown's beloved little red haired girl moves away (he still has to feed his dog amidst a broken heart and Linus gives him a little boot for not getting to know her when he had the chance!). Lucy ponders the meaning of life. Snoopy is the 1st dog to go to the moon and is left at the Van Pelts while Charlie and Sally Brown are on vacation. Charlie Brown has the chance to meet Joe Shlabotnik at a baseball banquet dinner and brings Linus and Snoopy (Snoopy flirts with Peggy Fleming). Linus reads the entire geneology of Jesus at a Christmas paegant (Lucy sarcastically suggests he read the entire book of Genesis while he's at it). Peppermint Patty tries selling a pumpkin after Halloween at no avail, so she tries to make a pie. Frieda pressures Snoopy to go rabbit chasing with the threat of reporting him to the head beagle if he doesn't comply. She's also Lucy's competition in hanging around Schroeder's piano (and of course, the musical maestro isn't crazy about either one of them, so he has 2 heads to remove from his piano instead of one!). I guess he hadn't forgotten the kite-eating tree incident! Peppermint Patty is forced to hang up her sandals at school because of the new dress code (Snoopy tries kissing away the tears and Franklin concludes "Any rule that would make a girl cry would have to be a bad rule!"). However, Peppermint Patty finds a worthy escort with Snoopy at a school dance and when someone insults the kid with the big nose, Peppermint Patty clobbers the guy!Read more ›
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By John D. Cofield TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on October 24, 2008
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I enjoyed this volume of The Complete Peanuts almost as much as I have the other volumes in this series. I knew that this particular volume would be somewhat bittersweet, as it was during 1969 and 1970 that I originally started to notice the strip was beginning to lose some of the sharpness of its glory years in the early to mid 1960s. In those years the Peanuts kids were diminutive philosophers creating the motifs that still resonate down the years as what Peanuts is all about: the security blanket, the Red Baron, the little red-haired girl, the toy piano, and so on.

All of these motifs are still present in the 1969-1970 volume, but they are beginning to be squeezed out by Schulz's increasing fascination with Snoopy's fantasy life and his new bird friend Woodstock. Now I love Snoopy and I find Woodstock appealing, don't get me wrong, but too many of the strips came to focus almost exclusively on them, to the detriment of some of the kid characters. Pig Pen has entirely disappeared, and Shermy, Patty, Frieda, and Violet only stroll by now and again. Charlie Brown, Lucy, Linus, and Peppermint Patty are now the only major characters besides Snoopy and Woodstock.

Everything changes, and Peanuts evolved almost continuously from its start in 1950. The difference I see here is that the changes apparent in this volume signal a move away from the strip's high point. Others will see this differently, of course, but for me personally this volume seems to start Peanuts' decline.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Johnny Heering on March 24, 2009
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Fantagraphics Books has ambitious plans to reprint the entire run of Charles Schulz's Peanuts comic strip. This volume reprints the strips from 1969 and 1970. Some of the memorable moments include: Lucy throws Schroeder's piano into the kite eating tree, Snoopy lands on the moon (in his imagination), the little red-haired girl moves away, Snoopy gets elected Head Beagle and Woodstock gets a name. Peanuts was a comic strip masterpiece and this book has two years worth of proof of that. I might mention as an aside that although Snoopy is pictured as the World War I Flying Ace on the cover, there are only a handful of strips in which he portrays that character.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By ewomack TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on November 9, 2008
Format: Hardcover
Another momentous event occurs in this, the tenth volume of what seems like an infinite series. 232 pages in, the various birds that have hung around Snoopy's place since the mid 1960s finally achieve distillation down to a recognizable unit. On June 22nd, 1970, Snoopy addresses the reader: "I finally found out what that stupid bird's name is... you'll never believe it.. Woodstock!" In the tradition of Mutt and Jeff, Batman and Robin, and even Laurel and Hardy, Snoopy and Woodstock became, from that moment on, almost inseparable companions. In this volume Snoopy plays straight man... dog... to Woodstock's fumblings. Most of their interaction at this point follows the same pattern: Woodstock runs into a tree, Snoopy comments, Woodstock takes a raucous birdbath, Snoopy comments, etc. After twenty years of Peanuts, its most famous duo has finally coagulated. A standout volume, indeed.

By this point the Peanuts gang had so settled into their routines, histrionics, and personalities that further comment isn't required. The absences remain more pronounced than the appearances. For instance, Pigpen does not appear once (though his filthy aura graces the spine). Shermy appears twice. When Frieda appears, she almost always goads Snoopy into chasing rabbits and not much more. Franklin's around, but he never plays a leading role. Peppermint Patty's monolithic personality crowds out these lesser characters. And Marcie doesn't even appear until the next volume. The Peanuts stage and cast won't change much for a few decades.

This volume closes out the 1960s. Some consider this decade the strip's absolute peak with the onset of the 1970s signaling the a decline that culminates in the 1990s. Whether true or not, no evidence of decline appears in this volume.
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