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The Complete Peanuts: 1991-1992 (Vol. 21) (The Complete Peanuts) Hardcover – June 8, 2014


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The Complete Peanuts: 1991-1992 (Vol. 21)  (The Complete Peanuts) + The Complete Peanuts 1993-1994 (The Complete Peanuts) + The Complete Peanuts 1989-1990 (Vol. 20)  (The Complete Peanuts)
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Product Details

  • Series: The Complete Peanuts
  • Hardcover: 344 pages
  • Publisher: Fantagraphics; 1 edition (June 8, 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1606997262
  • ISBN-13: 978-1606997260
  • Product Dimensions: 8.3 x 6.6 x 1.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #56,486 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

“...[T]errific, full of the dry wit and slapstick humor, the characters we all recognize in ourselves, the whimsy of a dog who can be anything, and much more. ... As Schulz headed into his fifth decade, he was still warmly entertaining, and this volume is well worth your time.” (Todd Klein)

About the Author

Charles M. Schulz was born November 25, 1922, in Minneapolis. His destiny was foreshadowed when an uncle gave him, at the age of two days, the nickname Sparky (after the racehorse Spark Plug in the newspaper strip Barney Google).In his senior year in high school, his mother noticed an ad in a local newspaper for a correspondence school, Federal Schools (later called Art Instruction Schools). Schulz passed the talent test, completed the course, and began trying, unsuccessfully, to sell gag cartoons to magazines. (His first published drawing was of his dog, Spike, and appeared in a 1937 Ripley's Believe It or Not! installment.) Between 1948 and 1950, he succeeded in selling 17 cartoons to the Saturday Evening Post—as well as, to the local St. Paul Pioneer Press, a weekly comic feature called Li'l Folks. It was run in the women's section and paid $10 a week. After writing and drawing the feature for two years, Schulz asked for a better location in the paper or for daily exposure, as well as a raise. When he was turned down on all three counts, he quit.He started submitting strips to the newspaper syndicates. In the spring of 1950, he received a letter from the United Feature Syndicate, announcing their interest in his submission, Li'l Folks. Schulz boarded a train in June for New York City; more interested in doing a strip than a panel, he also brought along the first installments of what would become Peanuts—and that was what sold. (The title, which Schulz loathed to his dying day, was imposed by the syndicate.) The first Peanuts daily appeared October 2, 1950; the first Sunday, January 6, 1952.Diagnosed with cancer, Schulz retired from Peanuts at the end of 1999. He died on February 13, 2000, the day before Valentine's Day—and the day before his last strip was published—having completed 17,897 daily and Sunday strips, each and every one fully written, drawn, and lettered entirely by his own hand—an unmatched achievement in comics.

More About the Author

Charles M. Schulz was born November 25, 1922 in Minneapolis. His destiny was foreshadowed when an uncle gave him, at the age of two days, the nickname Sparky (after the racehorse Spark Plug in the newspaper strip Barney Google).

In his senior year in high school, his mother noticed an ad in a local newspaper for a correspondence school, Federal Schools (later called Art Instruction Schools). Schulz passed the talent test, completed the course and began trying, unsuccessfully, to sell gag cartoons to magazines. (His first published drawing was of his dog, Spike, and appeared in a 1937 Ripley's Believe It Or Not! installment.) Between 1948 and 1950, he succeeded in selling 17 cartoons to the Saturday Evening Post--as well as, to the local St. Paul Pioneer Press, a weekly comic feature called Li'l Folks. It was run in the women's section and paid $10 a week. After writing and drawing the feature for two years, Schulz asked for a better location in the paper or for daily exposure, as well as a raise. When he was turned down on all three counts, he quit.

He started submitting strips to the newspaper syndicates. In the spring of 1950, he received a letter from the United Feature Syndicate, announcing their interest in his submission, Li'l Folks. Schulz boarded a train in June for New York City; more interested in doing a strip than a panel, he also brought along the first installments of what would become Peanuts--and that was what sold. (The title, which Schulz loathed to his dying day, was imposed by the syndicate). The first Peanuts daily appeared October 2, 1950; the first Sunday, January 6, 1952.

Diagnosed with cancer, Schulz retired from Peanuts at the end of 1999. He died on February 13, 2000, the day before Valentine's Day--and the day before his last strip was published--having completed 17,897 daily and Sunday strips, each and every one fully written, drawn, and lettered entirely by his own hand--an unmatched achievement in comics.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Norman A on June 28, 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I was still in elementary school when the Peanuts comic strip appeared in the newspapers (I was on schedule; didn't fail any grades). While there are many comic strips I like a lot, Peanuts is my favorite. I believe Charles Schulz achieved an enviable mix of great wisdom, a great sense of humor, and a wonderful drawing style. And, for the devoted fan, it's a very special thing to be able to see the progress and changes as they're captured in this wonderful series of books.

Like a breath of fresh air. I think that best captures, for me, the impact of the Peanuts strips for me on any given day. I would be hard-pressed to find one I didn't enjoy, if there is such a one.

I recommend them, one and all, very highly.
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Brian D. Scott on May 23, 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Never noticed this until today where I had to verify if I had this one or not (I don't!), but the characters on the spine are either facing left (1950-1974), forward (Charlie Brown only for the 1975-76 volume), or right (1977-end of the series). Charlie Brown's volume is of course "lucky 13" which is the middle of the soon-to-be completed 25 volume set!
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Anyone who follows my reviews knows that I love the Peanuts comic strips. It only makes me sad to see how quickly we are coming to the end of this collection. Still, we must enjoy while we can, and this volume adds to that enjoyment.

We are well into the time, now, where I can remember reading these strips originally in the newspaper. In fact, two of the strips in this collection I cut out of the paper and still have taped to my computer—Snoopy as an author is always worthwhile. Additionally, Marcie has some great stuff here (“Great Grape” anyone?) and Rerun is still strapped to the back of his mother’s bicycle, helmet and all.

I have been following this collection from the beginning and intend to follow it to the end, which is (too) fast approaching. Though it becomes harder and harder to find new words to describe excellence, you can be sure I’ll keep trying to find them. Schulz deserves no less.
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By Jouni Vikman on August 10, 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I love Peanuts and this book is as good as the previous volumes. Even five stars would be an option - but is the whole print run of this book damaged? I have now received it twice after the first had half of its pages bent or wrinkled. Even in the replacement several pages were creased. Or does Amazon ship its damaged books abroad and hope people won't bother to complain?
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