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The Composer Of " Desafinado", Plays

July 29, 1997 | Format: MP3

$8.99
Also available in CD Format
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
2:42
30
2
3:36
30
3
2:50
30
4
2:35
30
5
3:21
30
6
2:53
30
7
2:26
30
8
2:14
30
9
3:15
30
10
2:22
30
11
4:19
30
12
2:44
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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: May 19, 1997
  • Release Date: July 29, 1997
  • Label: Verve Records
  • Copyright: (C) 1997 The Verve Music Group, a Division of UMG Recordings, Inc.
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 35:17
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001NZBXTI
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (35 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #55,359 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

54 of 54 people found the following review helpful By John on October 23, 2002
Format: Audio CD
Everybody seems to be in agreement, so we can skip the part about how great this album is. Let's take a look at how this recording stands in relation to the development of Jobim's music and the whole bossa craze.
Stan Getz and Charlie Byrd initiated that craze in the U.S. with the release of "Desafinado" in the summer of 1962. To capitalize on this, Jobim arrived in the U.S. for the first time toward the end of the year. He recorded "The Composer Plays" in May, 1963 in NYC. Before all this, though, the 36 year-old Jobim had co-protagonized the full cycle of Brazil's bossa nova revolution and subsequent counter-revolutions in his native Rio. The oldest songs on this record were by then six years old. Nearly all were already full-fledged Brazilian standards. Even "Girl from Ipanema," which only debuted in the spring of 1962 with the mark of an instant classic, had already been played to death. This recording then, made 6,000 miles from the maelstrom of Rio and its by then inbred bossa scene, was a chance for Jobim to reclaim his music.
What claim then, did Jobim make? Bossa is often described as a marriage of the samba rhythm to the cool jazz aesthetic. No bossa recording demonstrates that better than this one. Melodically, Jobim coulnd't have played it any "cooler." Melody is front and center, played on the piano -- one finger most of the time -- or sometimes shared out to the alto flute or trombone. Though Jobim was immersed in jazz in the U.S., there is hardly a lick of improvisation. The solos are carefully constructed and played simply as alternate melody lines. The marvelous Claus Ogerman string arrangements -- amazingly spare and lush at the same time and added like dashes of color -- are used to highlight Jobim's harmonics.
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41 of 41 people found the following review helpful By "songlife" on May 12, 2002
Format: Audio CD
I was pleased to see someone else refer to this as possibly the best bossa recording in history. I've often thought about that when I hear it; it could very well be, and anyone who says that will get no argument from me. I've referred it to friends as "the best debut album by anyone, in any genre", and I still stand by that. It is perfect.
I discovered this album, and bossa nova, in a record store in the early 80's. I was young and searching for new musical styles to get into, and I had no idea who Jobim was and asked the shop owner to play it. It really caught my attention big time, and I commented to the guy that it sounded brilliant, but he didn't seem too impressed; being a modal jazz guy, he just thought it was "sweet" (saccahrine). I bought it, listened to it a million times, and thus began my lifelong love of bossa nova and Brazilian music. I now have collected over 500 CDs of bossa nova, and have found that genre to be the most reliably passionate and lovely music ever made.
"The Composer Plays" is a masterpiece. Upon it's release, it was given 5 stars by an astute popular jazz reviewer, Pete Welding. Personally, I think it's off the ratings scale. Every song on this album became a standard forever. How many albums ever accomplished that?! Arranger Claus Ogerman really understood the composer's intentions, and his arrangements are sweet, highly romantic, very mature, and very sympathetic. ...This is not jazz or improvisation. Jobim's piano is his voice on these songs, his ultimate way of letting us know exactly what the melodies are and how they go. And they're so strong that it works, wonderfully.
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20 of 21 people found the following review helpful By David J. DiSantis on February 18, 2000
Format: Audio CD
It was 1975. Medical school -- interminable hours buried in the belly of the library, surrounded by dry books and drier company. It couldn't help but suck the cool right out of you. And then, like a fresh Brazilian breeze off the Atlantic, I heard these so sweet melodies flowing from my room mate's stereo. I was hooked instantly. These tunes are so phenominally beautiful that your mellowness meter and cool quotient will zoom. By the end of "Desafinado," you'll wish it were 1960 so Bossa Nova could start all over again.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Donna Fred on January 19, 2000
Format: Audio CD
In 1965 the Bossa Nova was just blossoming. I was an eighteen year old, doe eyed teen and hopelessly romantic. This album sets a mood like no other! I had lost my 331/3 rpm years ago and have been searching for this everywhere. Alas! I have it again in this beautiful re-master. You cant go wrong here if you love a slow romantic, bosa nova. It is truly a classic of the 60's.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Philip Eldring on October 18, 1999
Format: Audio CD
A few years go I worked in a record/CD store. My colleague was about 42 years old (by that time I was about 23 years old) and already into Bossa Nova music. So he played Jobim's records over and over again. I started liking it a bit because it was relaxing. Then I saw David Lynch's "Lost Highway" flick and heard "Insenzatez". That just blew me away so that I started running 'round and looking for the original album. And I found this remaster...! Bang !! Every song is a classic which makes me fantasize about a cool brazilian place in the 60's with cocktails or just relaxing and listen to the playing or both or doing everything what is chilling on me. This is a must-have for all people who got style.
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