The Conquest 2012 NR

Amazon Instant Video

(7) IMDb 6.3/10
Available in HD

Denis Podalydès delivers a witty yet commanding portrayal of Nicolas Sarkozy and his rise to the French presidency through the lens of his unraveling marriage to then-wife Cecilia (Florence Pernel). Never one to disguise his ambition, the film's Sarkozy curries favor with predecessor Jacques Chirac (Bernard Le Coq) and spars gamely with glib rival Dominique de Villepin (Samuel Labarthe).

Starring:
Denis Podalydes, Florence Pernel
Runtime:
1 hour 51 minutes

Available in HD on supported devices.

The Conquest

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The Conquest

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Product Details

Director Xavier Durringer
Starring Denis Podalydes, Florence Pernel
Supporting actors Bernard Le Coq, Michèle Moretti, Samuel Labarthe, Emmanuel Noblet, Hippolyte Girardot, Mathias Mlekuz, Grégory Fitoussi, Pierre Cassignard, Dominique Besnehard, Michel Bompoil, Saïda Jawad, Gérard Chaillou, Nicolas Moreau, Yann Babilée, Fabrice Cals, Laurent Olmedo, Bruno López, Jean-Pierre Léonardini
Studio Music Box Films
MPAA rating NR (Not Rated)
Rental rights 3-day viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Paul Allaer TOP 100 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on April 1, 2012
Format: DVD
"The Conquest" (2011; France; 105 min.) brings the 5 year period leading up to Nicolas Sarkozy's election in 2007 as President of France. Please note that this is not a documentary, but a fictional retelling of that period. The movie actually brings two parallel yet intertwined stories to the viewer: in the first one, we see how Sarkozy, against many odds and often in a lonely position, nevertheless manages to upstage other rivals on his way to the presidency. Jacques Chirac (played brilliantly by Bernard Le Coq) does just about everything he can to stop Sarkozy in his tracks (Sarkozy must've thought more than once "with friends like this, who needs enemies?"). In the second story line, we see how the marriage of Nicolas and Cecilia Sarkozy is struggling and ultimately falling apart. I didn't realize that Cecilia played a very active role in Sarkozy's election advisors team, and then actually left Nicolas only months before the presidential election day.

The acting is generally speaking outstanding. Besides Bernard Le Coq, there is of course the performance of Denis Podalydès in the role of Nicolas Sarkozy, and also Florence Pernel in the role of Cecilia Sarkozy. The movie doesn't seem to take itself too seriously, which is a good thing. In fact, it almost plays like a (French) soap, aside of being a political thriller (at which it is great). I enjoyed this movie from the start, and was surprised when the lights came on, I mean, it felt like the movie had just flashed by in no time.

This movie was released in France last May (making its debut at the Cannes film festival), but here in the US the movie is just now appearing in theatres, less than a month before the first round of the 2012 French presidential elections, how timely, and Sarkozy is again fighting for political survival. Having seen "The Conquest", though, I would not write off Sarkozy just yet, as he seems to have nine political lives. Meanwhile "The Conquest" is highly recommended!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Cheryl Kloda on August 7, 2013
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
this movie does not lag. The pace and acting are wonderful. A real look into the world of politics which many times is an illusion.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Scott McFarland on October 10, 2012
Format: Amazon Instant Video Verified Purchase
I have no idea how close to reality this is or isn't. But it is full of momentum and it is solidly entertaining.
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Format: Amazon Instant Video Verified Purchase
If you like political-themed dramas, this one is it. Nicolas Sarkozy, who today was unelected from his position as French president, rose to power from within his ministry of interior position back in 2007. This movie, although claimed to be fiction, really is about Sarkozy's behind-the-scene bantering to gain power.

The acting is very well done. All the actors actually look like the people they are representing: Jacques Chirac (Bernard Le Coq), Nicolas Sarkozy (Denis Podalydès) and then-wife Cecilia (Florence Pernel), Dominique de Villepin (Samuel Labarthe) do look like the real people they are protraying. Denis Podalydès even has Sarkozy's mannerisms down well, from the well-known lip pout to the way he stares at people.

What we see in this movie is how determined both Cecilia and Nicolas Sarkozy want the presidential position, but it also shows how much Cecilia hates the limelight and having to be someone she is not. She tires of what is expected of her as First Lady, which is one reason the marriage faltered after 11 odd years. Nicolas did what he has to do to win, at the expense of his marriage. Theirs was a bitter divorce laid out to the public.

I can not vouch for the accuracy of this movie, but it is entertaining and an insight into modern French politics. The animosity between Chirac and Sarkozy is real, the snide remarks from one another equally acidic. It's no different than the American system, but perhaps with less drama and more corruption.

My only complaint? There is so much dialogue that the subtitles can't often keep up!
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