Qty:1

Sell yours for a Gift Card
We'll buy it for up to $1.00
Learn More
Trade in now
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Color:
  • The Constant Nymph
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
  • To view this video download Flash Player
      

The Constant Nymph


List Price: $19.99
Price: $12.99 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details
You Save: $7.00 (35%)
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
20 new from $11.53 6 used from $8.92
Watch Instantly with Rent Buy
Other Formats & Versions Amazon Price New from Used from
DVD
"Please retry"
1-Disc Version
$12.99
$11.53 $8.92
DVD-R Note: This product is manufactured on demand when ordered from Amazon.com. [Learn more]

Deal of the Day: Sons of Anarchy: Seasons 1-6 plus coupon for Season 7
Today only and while supplies last, save 47% on the Sons of Anarchy: Season 1-6 limited edition box-set plus receive a coupon code via email to get a copy of Sons of Anarchy: Season 7 to complete your collection. Offer ends December 18, 2014 at 11:59pm PST. Learn more


Frequently Bought Together

The Constant Nymph + Letter From an Unknown Woman + Born to be Bad
Price for all three: $41.24

Buy the selected items together

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Product Details

  • Actors: Charles Boyer, Joan Fontaine and Brenda Marshall
  • Directors: Edmund Goulding
  • Format: NTSC
  • Language: English
  • Region: All Regions
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: NR (Not Rated)
  • Studio: Warner Archive
  • DVD Release Date: December 13, 2011
  • Run Time: 112 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B0066E6QQQ
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #25,593 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Special Features

None.

Editorial Reviews

The heart yearns for the ineffable, though mere words cannot express it. Edmund Goulding directs this adaptation of Margaret Kennedy's story of a bohemian naïf (Joan Fontaine) and a complicated sophisticate (Alexis Smith) locked in battle over the love of a poor, gifted composer (Charles Boyer). The naïf, young Tessa, has loved the composer Lewis all her life - it's a love that is deep, selfless, and all encompassing. Lewis, meanwhile, meets and marries Tessa's cousin, Florence, whose love for Lewis is more flawed, and more human. Loyal to his bride, Lewis nonetheless finds himself drawn to Tessa more and more. Her boundless faith in Lewis transforms Tessa, first into Lewis' muse, and then into something more; while Florence's jealousies lock her into a mortal battle with a child she can't hope to win. Rarely seen for nearly seventy years, the timeless tale of love, tragedy and inspiration returns at last.

This product is manufactured on demand using DVD-R recordable media. Amazon.com's standard return policy will apply.

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
5 star
7
4 star
2
3 star
3
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 12 customer reviews
How many movies can you say that about.
Bernice B. Aronold
No doubt I will be viewing this film again and again for some time.
G. Alan Hicks
Together, they work well and yet almost feel displaced; almost.
Andrew Ellington

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

18 of 19 people found the following review helpful By G. Alan Hicks on February 25, 2012
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
For those wondering the quality of the print of this Warner Archive release, please be aware that it is NOT clean and flaw-free. In fact, I would compare it to earlier releases from the Turner-era, before digital cleaning and repair became the norm. This print indeed has its minor short-comings.

But to finally be able to see this beautiful classic makes up for the lack of polish and digital magic. There are no serious breaks in the film stock, and the sound is quite clean overall, so the fact that it is not perfect matters little to me. No doubt I will be viewing this film again and again for some time.

Enjoy!
5 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
21 of 27 people found the following review helpful By Kevin Killian HALL OF FAME on December 28, 2011
Format: DVD
It took us several days to get through the moving and glittery CONSTANT NYMPH, but others may just want to dive in and drown in its luxurious Warner Brothers gloss and the fabulous Korngold music. As Glenn Erickson says on the DVD Savant blog, THE CONSTANT NYMPH dramatizes the making of a musical composition, the "symphonic poem" TO-MORROW which gradually grows and changes and attains its final expression during the course of the film, and this part of the film is a triumphant success. It is a glorious piece of music and the oddest thing is that when the singer, the glorious Clemence Groves, begins her solo, the chord changes are dramatically similar to those of a much later piece of musical theater, Stephen Sondheim's "Losing My Mind" from FOLLIES--and I'm like, hey, that's weird, didn't FOLLIES also have Alexis Smith in it? I wondered if Sondheim had played around with "To-Morrow" when he was composing "Losing My Mind" as a tribute to his great star.

Well, maybe it's me losing my mind, but wait till you see it! As the first reviewer on Amazon I should tell you something about the movie, it is based on a novel that was one of my grandmother's favorites, by Margaret Kennedy, and it's one of those novels, like Dusty Answer by Rosamond Lehmann, in which a young outsider falls in love with an entire family. In this case, the British composer Lewis Dodd encounters an older master, Albert Sanger, and takes to his entire bohemian setup of girls. (If you like I CAPTURE THE CASTLE you'll enjoy this one too.) Hiring Charles Boyer meant that they had to make Lewis Dodd Belgian? Not French, Belgian, perhaps Belgians were considered more kinky than Frenchmen? Anyhow it seems crazy that they bothered to make him Belgian but to still keep his very British name, "Lewis Dodd.
Read more ›
7 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Bernice B. Aronold on March 27, 2013
Format: Amazon Instant Video Verified Purchase
I not only remembered the name but the stars of this movie I saw only one time over 60 years ago. It was a movie I saw as a teenager and could not forget with the passage of time. How many movies can you say that about.

I gave this short and simple movie five stars because it far superior to many movies given an academy award today. Frankly it is what I would call a condensed soap opera or a "B Grade" which were so popular in the past - in other words a movie worth about 4 stars; but a movie you have a hard time forgetting. To sum it up, the movie makes you feel human emotions which most movies do not do anymore.

Most movies are not only unrealistic but the charactors are dehuminized to objects that will do anything to get what they want. That is why the underlying fabric of our society is crumbling. The old movie producers might not have lived perfect lives; but they did try to give society a model to follow to help the public to surive this imperfect society - specifically a definition of right and wrong - good and evil.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By R. Ross on November 8, 2013
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
I have watched this film four times since it arrived two days ago. It becomes deeper with each viewing. Erich Wolfgang Korngold's piece Tomorrow is at the heart of the story. Director Edmund Goulding makes it the driving force of the story. Although Bernard Hermann's composition for Hitchcock's The Man Who Knew Too Much is a fine piece of music, Hitch has it in there as a device to move forward his suspenseful scene. In The Constant Nymph, the movie rises to a transcendent crescendo as the performance of Tomorrow combines with an other-wordly encounter between Joan Fontaine and Charles Boyer, where their spiritual selves speak to one another saying what their physical selves never had and never would say . Fontaine said it was her favorite film. It is easy to see why. In a scene toward the end and before the performance of Tomorrow, Fontaine says the word "Beloved". What happens in her face just after is acting on a level rarely acheived. The personality she has had throughout the entire story momentarily drops away as if she has realized her true self. It is not soft focus or romanticized. It has the ring of truth. It combines wisdom and sadness in a whisp of vanishing expression. I gave it 5 stars because that was all that was available.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By John Austin VINE VOICE on June 8, 2014
Format: DVD
"The Constant Nymph" appeared as a novel in 1924 by Margaret Kennedy. She made a play adaptation two years later, and film versions appeared in 1928, 1933, and this one in 1943.

Under the terms of Margaret Kennedy's will, the film was banned from public screenings after its initial run, and it only now gets its first DVD release, nearly 70 years later. As one who saw it as a youngster and has now seen it again I make the following comments: -

The plot touches on elements that seem dated, theatrical, even melodramatic. A composer can live in a palatial home with sweeping staircases and street-wide entrance halls. His "great work" is performed by large orchestral and vocal forces at one of London's great concert halls and broadcast live. He has a beautiful wife but he bonds much more closely with a sweet, innocent but doomed Swiss girl.

A lush film score was proved by Erich Korngold, involving briefly a wonderful singer named Clemence Groves. Alexis Smith wears the great gowns of the 1940s, and such well-known players as Dame May Whitty, Charles Coburn and Peter Lorre have small parts.

It is the work of Charles Boyer and Joan Fontaine that best stands up to the tests of time. Indeed, Joan Fontaine, who regarded this as her best film, was unlucky to be only nominated but not awarded the best actress Oscar for 1943.

The print quality is excellent, but there are no subtitles.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Forums

There are no discussions about this product yet.
Be the first to discuss this product with the community.
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in