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Comment: Ships from Memphis, Tennessee. Cover shows some wear/creases. Stamp on inside cover. Pages are in very good shape and are clean. All domestic orders come with free tracking. See BOTH pics of my book attached to this listing. (WC)
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The Art of Cookery Made Plain and Easy Paperback – June 1, 1998


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The Art of Cookery Made Plain and Easy + The First American Cookbook: A Facsimile of "American Cookery," 1796 + The City Tavern Cookbook: Recipes from the Birthplace of American Cuisine
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Applewood Books; Reprint edition (June 1, 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1557094624
  • ISBN-13: 978-1557094629
  • Product Dimensions: 5 x 0.9 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #71,193 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

26 of 26 people found the following review helpful By Brian Connors VINE VOICE on December 6, 2003
Format: Paperback
This book is a must-have for collectors of antiquarian cookbooks, even if it is a facsimile of a posthumous edition published in America. Makes me wish I had the appropriate kitchen.
To appreciate what Hannah Glasse's work did for cooking, it's necessary to understand what place it had in the market of the 18th century -- it was the book for English-speaking cooks, even in Revolutionary times as popular in the Colonies as it was back home in England. It's a bit more in scope than a typical modern cookbook as well, including things like beer/wine/mead recipes and preserves that are usually in separate books today, and even an occasional home remedy. The recipes cover much classic British Isles cooking, including Roast Beef with Yorkshire Pudding, meat pies, Scotch Broth, and a good number of seafood recipes.
The recipes in question probably don't lend themselves much to modern kitchens, unless you've got a fireplace with pothooks and a beehive oven in the chimney. But it's still enough to make you imagine, and to realize that while the techniques have changed, food hasn't changed much in two hundred years and change. The recipes are done in a conversational style that seems strange in a cookbook but should feel familiar to anyone who's learned a recipe at someone's elbow. Don't expect precise measurements everywhere either; you're expected to be able to figure such things out on your own. (One bit of advice: unlike modern recipes, where you can pick out the ingredients and work as you read, it behooves the reader to study the recipe before hand and take notes if necessary.)
As I said, it's a facsimile of a later edition from 1804 or so, and includes updates that aren't distinguished from Glasse's original text (thus my one-star deduction, which is a highly subjective decision). That said, it's likely a faithful rendition of how early America ate, and an invaluable reference to anyone who wishes to learn how it was done back in the day.
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32 of 33 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 10, 2000
Format: Paperback
One of the best cookbooks of the time period. I use this cookbook to recreate 18th century receipts (recipes) for a living history museum. This book is not only informitive on 18th century cooking in general, many of the recipes can be cooked today. Try an onion pie and with the left over pie crust make kickshaws, a type of cookie with jam. This book will become your primary source for 18th century cooking and with its glossary it is better than many other editions.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Jennifer G on February 21, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I purchased this book after reading Walter Staib's City Tavern Cookbook, as he had referenced Hannah Glasse's cookery book. I'm so glad I did, because I appreciated his modern interpretation of her recipes, or receipts as they were known in the 18th century.
I enjoyed the window into how cooking was done back then and found many useful tips seem to have been forgotten and
discovered all over again in recent times, such as overcooking vegetables.
From Glasse, pg. 35:
"Directions Concerning Garden Things
Most people spoil garden things by over-boiling them. All things that are green should have a little crispness, for if they are over-boiled, they neither have any sweetness or beauty."
Finally, I enjoyed the rich diversity (modern term) of receipts to what was then called, "Ethnic cooking":
"Carrots and French Beans dressed the Dutch Way", "Marmalade of Eggs made the Jews Way", "Artichokes preserved the Spanish Way", etc.
Don't expect precise measurements or heating temperatures. To really appreciate this cookbook, you must also appreciate how food was cooked in the 16th through early 19th centuries - in a very large fireplace about 8 feet wide and 5 feet high, with a fire that shouldn't go out overnight lest you'll have to walk to your neighbor's sometimes a mile away for coals to start again for the breakfast meal.
Cooking times were from careful observation over what I'm sure were several disasterous results; and food was cooked in iron kettles weighing 30 or more pounds - imagine picking one up when full! Temperatures were regulated by changing the distance of the skillet or pot to the fire, not turning a knob as we do now. What appreciation I have for the women back then!
For cookbook aficianados or those interested in domestic history, it's a perfect addition to their libraries.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By C. M. Smith on February 25, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
As much a history book as a cookbook and I read it as such. A cool read. Vey fun and educational.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Rachel Anderson on November 22, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
KINDLE VERSION:100% illegible

I was hoping that the for-purchase kindle version of this book might be better than the free online google draft (which looks to be just a bad copy job). Save your money! This version is significantly worse, there are additional letters in random places and at all paragraph breaks.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Gail E. Trout on July 6, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book was brought to my attention by a cooking show on T.V. The chef was cooking her receipies exactly as she would have done using the same cuts of meat and an open fireplace. I'm not planning on going quite that far, but I'll be trying a couple just to experiment with ingredients.
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