The Course of Modern Jewish History and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy Used
$4.00
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Acceptable
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Course of Modern Jewish History Paperback – August 11, 1990


See all 9 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$5.91
Paperback
"Please retry"
$7.89 $0.01
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
$4.25

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Paperback: 912 pages
  • Publisher: Vintage; Revised edition (August 11, 1990)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0679727469
  • ISBN-13: 978-0679727460
  • Product Dimensions: 8 x 5.2 x 1.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 2.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #307,919 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"An invaluable aid to instructors of European and American Jewish History. "--Naomi Cohen

From the Publisher

"An invaluable aid to instructors of European and American Jewish History. "--Naomi Cohen

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

2.7 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 18, 2004
Format: Paperback
OK, look, this is a very impressive volume. Clearly written and quite a nice over-view.
But I have to say the sections on Jewish resistance during the Holocaust were pathetic. The author briefly mentions The Warsaw ghetto uprising, and a few words about Hannah Senesh, but that's about it. He doesn't even mention the uprisinsg at Treblinka and Sobibor, the fighters of Vilna or Lodz, or the amazing and daring feats of a Jewish patisans in the woods throughout Europe. He also fails to mention that the strongest and best fighters tended to be Bundists, not Zionists.
Oh well, hard to write such a sweeping history and cover everything. But to say the Jews went to their deaths like "sheep" (p.541) and not even adequately recount their heroism and resistance is irresponsible and greatly disappointing.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 7 people found the following review helpful By David Dressler on March 30, 2000
Format: Paperback
Howard Sachar is about as good an historian as you could hope for. His books are detailed, clear, and generally free of bias. "Course of Modern Jewish History" is no exception.
This book follows the history of Jews throughout the world from the 18th century until today. It does so in a generally chronological order, although at times it breaks this standard to move country by country during a specific period. Each chapter ends with a "conclusion" which usually lasts anywhere from a paragraph to a page or two. This section can generally be skipped (unless you are cramming for a exam and don't want to actually be bothered with reading the chapter).
Because it is a survey text, it never goes into quite as much detail as I would like. The section on the Holocaust felt particularly rushed. Despite its prodigious length (it is nearly 900 pages), I wouldn't have complained if it were even another 100 pages longer.
Despite these shortcomings, it is a tremendous first step in the examination of modern Jewish history, and it could even serve as the final step for many.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 16 people found the following review helpful By "ha-mevaker" on November 4, 2001
Format: Paperback
While it is quite normal for authors of Jewish History to take sides, unfortunately in this book the author gives such a distorted view that it is in many cases misleading. While I am not an expert on all facets of Jewish History, from the parts that I know I was able to find a number of basic factual errors. For example, the author states that Zyklon B gas was used throughout the Holocaust at all of the camps. In Treblinka, the Germans used carbon monoxide exhaust from tank engines. Of course this is a minor mistake, but it is an example of the author making mistakes even when he didn't have any political reasons to. A more major error is that the author portrays the Vilna Gaon as a proto-Maskil. While it is true that the Vilna Gaon said that if one isn't proficient in certain areas of science one can't fully understand Torah. Still, the Vilna's Gaon had many students, and they founded Yeshivot. Perhaps the author is uncomfortable mentioning this because these Yeshivot were one of the main reason that Haskala was unsucessful in Russia before 1860.
My main two difficulties with the book are that there is a glaring lack of basic critical information and that the author simply doesn't bother mentioning people or institutions that he doesn't like. Hungarian Jewry is almost not mentioned in the book and is ignored comparitively.
There are so many mis-representations in the book that it is sad. For example, Rabbi SR Hirsch and Dr. Zecharya Frankel are breifly portrayed as being idealogically close to each other. They both would either be insulted or amused to see this because in fact they were bitter opponents.
The main thrust of the book is to show the secularization of the Jews in Europe.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?