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The Cove [Blu-ray]


List Price: $19.99
Price: $8.49 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details
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Product Details

  • Actors: Richard O'Barry, Louie Psihoyos, Hardy Jones, Michael Illiff, Joji Morishita
  • Directors: Louie Psihoyos
  • Writers: Mark Monroe
  • Producers: Charles Hambleton, Fisher Stevens, Jim Clark, Olivia Ahnemann, Paula DuPré Pesmen
  • Format: Multiple Formats, AC-3, Blu-ray, Closed-captioned, Dolby, DTS Surround Sound, NTSC, Subtitled, Widescreen
  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: English, Spanish
  • Region: Region A/1 (Read more about DVD/Blu-ray formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.85:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: PG-13 (Parental Guidance Suggested)
  • Studio: Lionsgate
  • DVD Release Date: April 5, 2011
  • Run Time: 92 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (368 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B004M7MOZ6
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #25,531 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "The Cove [Blu-ray]" on IMDb

Special Features

None.

Editorial Reviews

In a sleepy lagoon off the coast of Japan, behind a wall of barbed wire and “Keep Out” signs, lies a shocking secret. It is here, under cover of night, that the fishermen of Taiji engage in an unseen hunt for thousands of dolphins. The nature of the work is so horrifying, a few desperate men will stop at nothing to keep it hidden from the world. But when an elite team of activists, filmmakers and free divers embark on a covert mission to penetrate the cove, they discover that the shocking atrocities they find there are just the tip of the iceberg.

Customer Reviews

The people doing this excellent documentary are very brave activists.
Guy Denutte
In this case, the "hidden secret" is the capturing and slaughtering of thousands of dolphins each year in the small fishing town of Taiji, Wakayama Prefecture, Japan.
Brian Covert
The goal of The Cove is to stop the dolphin slaughter by exposing exactly what happens in Taiji.
N. Duvoisin

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

102 of 107 people found the following review helpful By Roland E. Zwick on February 4, 2010
Format: DVD
****1/2

Ric O'Barry may be the world's premier lover of dolphins, but the one place you'll never find him at is Sea World taking in a show. That's because he'd much rather expend his time and energy in freeing those marvelous creatures from captivity - an act for which he has been arrested numerous times and which has earned him the status of persona non grata in many quarters. Yet, although O'Barry may be an "environmental whacko" (maybe even a "dangerous criminal") in the eyes of some, to others - and certainly to the dolphins whose freedom and well-being he champions - O'Barry is a real life hero.

The remarkable, consciousness-raising documentary "The Cove" chronicles O'Barry's efforts to make a clandestine video record of a dolphin slaughter that takes place regularly in a secluded cove in Taiji, Japan, far away from public view. Here thousands of dolphins are trapped, some to be captured and sold to dolphinariums, but most to be brutally massacred for food. To get his video, O'Barry enlisted the aid of various friends and colleagues, who formed a kind of "Ocean's Eleven" special ops team of high-tech video and sound engineers, to pull off the scheme.

Why, some might wonder, should animals like dolphins and whales be protected from such ritualized slaughter when other mammals like cows and sheep are not? O'Barry would posit that it is because, alone among all God's creatures, the dolphin has a uniquely symbiotic relationship with mankind, as evidenced by tales told from time immemorial of dolphins rescuing humans stranded at sea and even of protecting them from underwater predators such as sharks.
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137 of 151 people found the following review helpful By thornhillatthemovies.com VINE VOICE on August 16, 2009
The new documentary "The Cove" tells a story the Japanese government would rather not be made public.

Richard O'Barry, the principal subject of the film, wrestles with almost constant feelings of remorse. In the mid 60s, he served as the technical advisor for the successful television show "Flipper"; he helped find, train and care for the dolphins who played the title character. The success of the series is viewed as the catalyst to the creation of "Ocean Parks" around the world, places like the various "Sea World" parks, where thousands of people visit every year to watch dolphins, whales and other sea creatures perform tricks. O'Barry learns of a small fishing village in Japan, Taijii, where the main business is to capture dolphins and herd them into captivity. They sell the best dolphins to parks, exhibits, "swimming with dolphins" type businesses and more, earning as much as $150,000 for the best of the best. But what do they do with the rest of these creatures? The ones that don't sell? O'Barry knows and he wants to expose the truth to the world in an effort to put a stop to it.

He enlists the aid of Louie Psihoyos, a documentary filmmaker, who assembles a team of people. They begin to gather all of the equipment they will need for the project and make many plans on how to infiltrate the secret areas before they set off for Japan. As soon as they arrive, the sheer amount of baggage (all of their equipment) catches the attention of the authorities and they are quickly under surveillance. The police visit O'Barry many times, each time trying to get him to admit his guilt. He doesn't trust them and they don't believe him.
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46 of 49 people found the following review helpful By Rodrigo Conde on February 10, 2010
Format: DVD
I really think everyone should watch this documentary, not because this is just a great documentary (and it is), or because their cause deserve any more attention than any other animal cruelty or global warming issue, but because it pictures the kind of people the world is most in need nowadays.

These people are different from us, who, in most cases, see what is happening to earth and its wildlife and just think: "i wish i could do something to change all this", or maybe just don't care at all. This is where these people differ from us, they actually got out and did something about it, sometimes even risking themselves.

What is happening in Japan, and other places in the world, where dolphins are being literally slaughtered, is a cruelty, plain and simple. When i see something like this happening i think: "there is no hope for the human race, we're just doomed, we're killing this planet a creature at a time." But when these kind of people try to do something to change all this, the hope that was lying dead inside me just awakens again and I pray that my children and grandchildren (I'm 22 yo) can live in a better world than this.

Even without knowing any of them, I feel proud for the people who did this documentary. And if this post or review helps to gather more and more people to their cause, than this is just a tiny drop of water in an ocean compared to what they did. So buy this movie, donate to their cause, shout at the streets, just trying to do anything is better than doing nothing.
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