Sell yours for a Gift Card
We'll buy it for $2.52
Learn More
Trade in now
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Creature from Jekyll Island : A Second Look at the Federal Reserve Paperback – May, 1998


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$18.30 $19.19
Take%20an%20Extra%2030%25%20Off%20Any%20Book

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Take an Extra 30% Off Any Book: Use promo code HOLIDAY30 at checkout to get an extra 30% off any book for a limited time. Excludes Kindle eBooks and Audible Audiobooks. Restrictions apply. Learn more.


NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Year
Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 608 pages
  • Publisher: Amer Media; 3rd edition (May 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0912986212
  • ISBN-13: 978-0912986210
  • Product Dimensions: 1.5 x 9.2 x 6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (236 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #30,315 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"A superb analysis deserving serious attention by all Americans. Be prepared for one heck of a journey through time and mind."

Ron Paul

Publisher/Editor, Ron Paul Report

Member, House Banking Committee

"What every American needs to know about central bank power. A gripping adventure into the secret world of the international banking cartel."

Mark Thornton

Asst. Professor of Economics, Auburn Univ.

Coordinator Academic Affairs,

Ludwig von Mises Institute

"A magnificent accomplishment - a train load of heavy history, organized so well and written in such a relaxed and easy style that it captivated me. I hated to put it down."

Dan Smoot

Publisher/Editor, Dan Smoot Report -- Publisher/Editor, Dan Smoot Report

About the Author

Mr. Griffin is a graduate of the University of Michigan, where he majored in speech and communications. He is a recipient of the Telly Award for excellence in television production.

He is the founder of the Cancer Cure Foundation and has served on the board of directors of the National Health Federation and the International Association of Cancer Victims and Friends. He is a Contributing Editor for The New American magazine, president of American Media and founder of the Reality Zone.

Customer Reviews

This book may be 600 pages but it was an easy read.
Pen Name
If you're inclined to read only one political book, be sure it's this one, as it will make sense of your world like nothing else.
STEPHEN T. McCARTHY
This book must be read by all: First, to understand the Federal Reserve System, the World Bank, and how they control money.
Rich

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

672 of 687 people found the following review helpful By Jeffrey Leach HALL OF FAME on July 29, 2001
Format: Paperback
G. Edward Griffin is to be commended for this splendid work. At first glance The Creature from Jekyll Island is a huge book. While this may be daunting to some, once the book is actually started, it flows smoothly and reads quickly. There are so many fascinating tidbits of information here that the reader won't even be concerned about the size of the book. The title refers to the formation of the Federal Reserve System, which occurred at a secret meeting at Jekyll Island, Georgia in 1910. It was at this meeting, as Griffin relates, that the "Money Trust", composed of the richest and most powerful bankers in the world, along with a U.S. Senator, wrote the proposal to launch the Federal Reserve System (which Griffin calls a banking cartel) to control the financial system so that the bankers will always come out on top.
While Griffin starts with this event, he quickly moves into the present day to detail several financial crises that resulted in a quick government intervention at the behest of the bankers from the Fed, who told all who would listen that if the government (read: taxpayers) didn't bail out the banks that had made bad loans, it could cause the entire system to collapse. Massive loan defaults; bank runs, and a major economic depression would manifest this collapse. Griffin shows how time and time again the taxpayer is bilked so that bankers can make billions in profits off of these financial scares. Griffin also shows how the supposed safeguards against these woes, such as the FSLIC, are scams to reassure the average person that their banks are safe. In actuality, these insurances against bank closures are so inadequate that there isn't enough money to even come close to paying off investors in case of a collapse.
Read more ›
34 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
246 of 265 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 30, 1999
Format: Paperback
In answer to the review below: I did do independent research. Did you? This book, while slightly marred by the occasional conspiracy theory, is a great account of one of the most important real life conspiracies of our time. It is well researched with plenty of footnotes for anyone who wants to look more deeply. It tells the real story of how bankers have lured politicians with easy money and ended up in control of most of the world. Whether or not they can keep up our (or rather, their) sleight-of-hand monetary system forever, the important thing is the power these bankers wield that should not be theirs.
This book should be required reading. And by all means do your own research.
Topics covered: founding of the Federal Reserve, war mongering, bail-outs, boom-bust cycles, the J.P.Morgans and Rothschilds of the world, the history of central banking in the United States, and most fascinating: how the money system really works in this country.
Despite its lack of perfection, this book is by far the most relevant and interesting thing I have read about economics in a long time. It is written in terms that anyone can understand, which will immediately rule out the kind of reader who is impressed by a lot of technical jargon that supposedly demonstrates an author's mastery of the subject while only serving to confuse laymen (and experts too). Combined with some of the author's own somewhat odd ideas, that does tend to make the book look less serious. But read it and you will see that the information is there. You can learn a great deal from this book.
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
67 of 69 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 23, 1999
Format: Paperback
This book is without a doubt the best book written on the "Federal" Reserve (which is about as "federal" as Federal Express). The book's four chapters explaining what money is (and isn't!) are the best I have ever read (and that includes the late, great economist Murray Rothbard's "What Has Government Done to Our Money"). My only qualm with this book is that Mr. Griffin should have left out the "C" word (i.e., conspiracy) from the text. He should just tell the history of the "Fed" along with his excellent economic analysis and let the reader figure out for him or herself what is going on. It becomes difficult to recommend this book to anybody outside of the John Birch Society (for which Mr. Griffin is a writer). But all in all, Mr. Griffin has done an admirable job. This is the true story of the monstrosity we affectionately call "The Fed" -- not like that Establishment whitewash on the "The Fed" by Rolling Stone writer William Greider called "Secrets of the Temple." For those of you who are skeptical about reading Mr. Griffin's long tome, you might want to start with Murray Rothbard's much shorter "The Case Against the Fed," before moving on to the Griffin work.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
216 of 236 people found the following review helpful By STEPHEN T. McCARTHY on May 5, 2006
Format: Paperback
What is The Creature From Jekyll Island? Well, first of all, it's uglier than The Creature from the Black Lagoon; it's more densely wrapped in deception than the Mummy is in cloth; it sucks the lifeblood of America more ravenously than Dracula does his victims; it reeks worse than the Werewolf; and it's stronger and more dangerous than Doctor Frankenstein's miscreation!

The Creature from Jekyll Island is the PRIVATE Federal Reserve that holds America and Her People hostage with an astoundingly perverse and "criminal" economic system that is an evil beyond your worst monster-infested nightmare. But the Creature comes in a guise to mislead the people, like a Wolfman in sheep's clothing.

Why is the system "criminal"? Because the U.S. Constitution proclaims itself to be the "supreme Law of the Land" (see Article VI), and Article I, Section VIII of the Constitution states that "The Congress shall (Constitutionally speaking, "shall" has been legally defined as "must")...coin money, regulate the value thereof, and of foreign coin, and fix the standard of weights and measures." Why Congress? Because it is answerable to the People it represents! Remember, our Constitutional Republic was meant to be representational government! We're a long way from that now! The Federal Reserve is NOT Congress; it is unelected, meaning nonrepresentational, and being therefore unconstitutional, it is illegal, hence "criminal."

I first read G. Edwrd Griffin's magnificent study, 'The Creature From Jekyll Island' eight years ago. I had read plenty of political books prior to this one, and countless since, but Mr.
Read more ›
10 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews