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The Creature from Jekyll Island: A Second Look at the Federal Reserve Paperback – June 1, 2002


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 608 pages
  • Publisher: American Media; 4th edition (June 1, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0912986395
  • ISBN-13: 978-0912986395
  • Product Dimensions: 8.8 x 6 x 1.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.8 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (231 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #48,983 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

G. Edward Griffin is a writer and documentary film producer with many successful titles to his credit. Listed in Who’s Who in America, he is well known because of his unique talent for researching difficult topics and presenting them in clear terms that all can understand. He has dealt with such diversified subjects as archaeology and ancient earth history, international banking, internal subversion, terrorism, the history of taxation, U.S. foreign policy, the science and politics of cancer therapy, the Supreme Court, and the United Nations. Some of his better known works include The Discovery of Noah's Ark, Moles in High Places, The Open Gates of Troy, No Place to Hide, World Without Cancer, The Life and Words of Robert Welch, The Capitalist Conspiracy, The Grand Design, The Great Prison Break, and The Fearful Master. His most recent book is entitled The Creature From Jekyll Island: A Second Look At The Federal Reserve.

More About the Author

G. Edward Griffin is a writer and documentary film producer with many successful titles to his credit. Listed in Who's Who in America, he is well known because of his unique talent for researching difficult topics and presenting them in clear terms that all can understand. He has dealt with such diversified subjects as archaeology and ancient earth history, international banking, internal subversion, terrorism, the history of taxation, U.S. foreign policy, the science and politics of cancer therapy, the Supreme Court, and the United Nations. Some of his better known works include The Discovery of Noah's Ark, Moles in High Places, The Open Gates of Troy, No Place to Hide, World Without Cancer, The Life and Words of Robert Welch, The Capitalist Conspiracy, The Grand Design, The Great Prison Break, and The Fearful Master. His most recent book is entitled The Creature From Jekyll Island: A Second Look At The Federal Reserve.

Customer Reviews

Very well written and easy to read.
R. Kalish
Most Americans still believe today that the Federal Reserve bank is a Federal Institution operated by their government.
Rev4u
If you read one section a week you can retain the information and tackle the book in 6 weeks.
Mark Fegley

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

410 of 421 people found the following review helpful By BuySilver Now on April 16, 2003
Format: Paperback
Think you know anything about the dollar bills in your wallet?
Think you know who runs this country?
Think that we live in a "free market" economy?
Think again.
Griffin piles up facts and analyzes them with relentless, cold logic. The picture he paints isn't pretty. The Federal Reserve System is a legal cartel expressly designed to create riskless profits for member banks, while simultaneously turning our entire financial system into the legal and moral equivalent of a Las Vegas casino. Yeah, you might get lucky for a while, but the house will always win. Our monetary system is a pyramid scheme that only functions as long as debt is being created at an accelerating rate.
This all sounds crazy, but Griffin has the facts to back it up. The challenging part about Griffin's arguments is that he explicitly states that the foundation and perpetuation of the Federal Reserve System was a conspiracy. Whenever the "C"-word is mentioned, it is an unfortunate truth that many people get turned off. But as Griffith himself says, if a group of people, operating in secret, create a system that explicitly benefits themselves at the expense of others, what else can you call it but conspiracy? Heck, I guess you could call it a "peanut" or a "canteloupe" but it would still add up to the same thing--a system expressly designed to reward failure and punish diligence and honesty. Kinda explains all the crookedness and incompetence behind all the wall street and corporate shenanigans of the last decade, doesn't it?
And if you keep an open mind and pay close attention to his arguments, you'll see that the best place to hide a conspiracy is in plain sight.
If you care about free markets, and your constitutional rights, you will read this book today.
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468 of 490 people found the following review helpful By STEPHEN T. McCARTHY on May 5, 2006
Format: Hardcover
What is The Creature From Jekyll Island? Well, first of all, it's uglier than The Creature from the Black Lagoon; it's more densely wrapped in deception than the Mummy is in cloth; it sucks the lifeblood of America more ravenously than Dracula does his victims; it reeks worse than the Werewolf; and it's stronger and more dangerous than Doctor Frankenstein's miscreation!

The Creature from Jekyll Island is the PRIVATE Federal Reserve that holds America and Her People hostage with an astoundingly perverse and "criminal" economic system that is an evil beyond your worst monster-infested nightmare. But the Creature comes in a guise to mislead the people, like a Wolfman in sheep's clothing.

Why is the system "criminal"? Because the U.S. Constitution proclaims itself to be the "supreme Law of the Land" (see Article VI), and Article I, Section VIII of the Constitution states that "The Congress shall (Constitutionally speaking, "shall" has been legally defined as "must")...coin money, regulate the value thereof, and of foreign coin, and fix the standard of weights and measures." Why Congress? Because it is answerable to the People it represents! Remember, our Constitutional Republic was meant to be representational government! We're a long way from that now! The Federal Reserve is NOT Congress; it is unelected, meaning nonrepresentational, and being therefore unconstitutional, it is illegal, hence "criminal."

I first read G. Edwrd Griffin's magnificent study, 'The Creature From Jekyll Island' eight years ago. I had read plenty of political books prior to this one, and countless since, but Mr.
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220 of 234 people found the following review helpful By Jeffrey Peter A. Hauck VINE VOICE on August 29, 2004
Format: Hardcover
Author G. Edward Griffin's book "The Creature From Jekyll Island: A Second Look At The Federal Reserve" is a most well researched and written historical text. Griffin presents the background with almost an air of mystery that the reader must peel away, like layers of an onion, to reveal the truth.

The book provides, in great detail, the time, place, and manner in which the groundwork for the Federal Reserve was laid, and more importantly, the reasons why. Griffin explains why even the name is misleading. The Federal Reserve is not a federal or governmental administration, and it is not a reserve, such as a bank.

Also provided is great historical detail about the commerce and industry in our nation during the Nineteenth and early Twentieth Centuries. This book will not disappoint the reader looking to expand his or her knowledge of how the collective financial machinations of our country are run.

I read this book during my undergraduate years and once presented the book in defense of a historical argument I had with one of my history professors. Needless to say the professor looked at my reference (the book is so well researched), acceded to my contention, borrowed the book "for his own enrichment" and never gave it back! I gratefully let him keep it so maybe he would soften his ascribed "socialist democrat" leanings. Unfortunately I am sans the book this day. Oh well, we march on.

As the topic of Civics is not really taught in public schools, or even required in undergraduate studies anymore, this book will serve to "illuminate" the reader into the background of how private finances and politics are inseparable. My only criticism of this text is the highlighted aspect of a government conspiracy at work.
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