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The Creature from Jekyll Island: A Second Look at the Federal Reserve Paperback


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 608 pages
  • Publisher: Amer Media; 5 edition (September 11, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 091298645X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0912986456
  • Product Dimensions: 8.9 x 6 x 1.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (298 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,598 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

G. Edward Griffin is to be commended for this splendid work. At first glance The Creature from Jekyll Island is a huge book. While this may be daunting to some, once the book is actually started, it flows smoothly and reads quickly. There are so many fascinating tidbits of information here that the reader won't even be concerned about the size of the book. The title refers to the formation of the Federal Reserve System, which occurred at a secret meeting at Jekyll Island, Georgia in 1910. It was at this meeting, as Griffin relates, that the "Money Trust", composed of the richest and most powerful bankers in the world, along with a U.S. Senator, wrote the proposal to launch the Federal Reserve System (which Griffin calls a banking cartel) to control the financial system so that the bankers will always come out on top. The biggest problem in modern banking, according to Griffin, is and has always been the creation of fiat money. Fiat money is money that is "declared" money by the government. It is not backed by anything but promises and deceit. All societies were sound financially when they used gold or silver to back their currency. When the bankers finally get their way and install fiat money, the result is inflation and boom and bust cycles. Griffin gives numerous examples of this, such as repeated failures by American colonies and European states in using fiat money. The purpose of fiat money is so that the government can spend more then they take in through taxes. Without writing reams on this book, it is sufficient to say that this is a must read for anyone who is interested in learning how the money system operates. Griffin gives comprehensive accounts of how the Fed creates money, and how this affects everyday life. I would have to say these sections are better than Murray Rothbard's book, The Case Against the Fed, because Griffin gives himself more room for explanation. Griffin does believe in the conspiratorial view of history, and he believes that the bankers are working in concert with such groups as the Council on Foreign Relations and the Trilateral Commission to bring about a socialist-world system in which an elite composed of intellectuals and bankers will rule over the entire planet. Griffin even spends a chapter outlining how this system could come about, and the consequent results of this socialist system. These chapters are a bit unsettling, but even if you aren't interested in this worldview, you can still learn much about the economy from this book. Recommended --By Jeffrey Leach on July 29, 2001

This book, while slightly marred by the occasional conspiracy theory, is a great account of one of the most important real life conspiracies of our time. It is well researched with plenty of footnotes for anyone who wants to look more deeply. It tells the real story of how bankers have lured politicians with easy money and ended up in control of most of the world. Whether or not they can keep up our (or rather, their) sleight-of-hand monetary system forever, the important thing is the power these bankers wield that should not be theirs. This book should be required reading. And by all means do your own research. Topics covered: founding of the Federal Reserve, war mongering, bail-outs, boom-bust cycles, the J.P.Morgans and Rothschilds of the world, the history of central banking in the United States, and most fascinating: how the money system really works in this country. Despite its lack of perfection, this book is by far the most relevant and interesting thing I have read about economics in a long time. It is written in terms that anyone can understand, which will immediately rule out the kind of reader who is impressed by a lot of technical jargon that supposedly demonstrates an author's mastery of the subject while only serving to confuse laymen (and experts too). --By A Customer on October 30, 1999

This book, while slightly marred by the occasional conspiracy theory, is a great account of one of the most important real life conspiracies of our time. It is well researched with plenty of footnotes for anyone who wants to look more deeply. It tells the real story of how bankers have lured politicians with easy money and ended up in control of most of the world. Whether or not they can keep up our (or rather, their) sleight-of-hand monetary system forever, the important thing is the power these bankers wield that should not be theirs. This book should be required reading. And by all means do your own research. Topics covered: founding of the Federal Reserve, war mongering, bail-outs, boom-bust cycles, the J.P.Morgans and Rothschilds of the world, the history of central banking in the United States, and most fascinating: how the money system really works in this country. Despite its lack of perfection, this book is by far the most relevant and interesting thing I have read about economics in a long time. It is written in terms that anyone can understand, which will immediately rule out the kind of reader who is impressed by a lot of technical jargon that supposedly demonstrates an author's mastery of the subject while only serving to confuse laymen (and experts too). --By A Customer on October 30, 1999

About the Author

Mr. Griffin is a graduate of the University of Michigan, where he majored in speech and communications. He is a recipient of the Telly Award for excellence in television production. He is the founder of the Cancer Cure Foundation and has served on the board of directors of the National Health Federation and the International Association of Cancer Victims and Friends. He is a Contributing Editor for The New American magazine, president of American Media and founder of the Reality Zone.

Customer Reviews

Read this important book.
Guy Denutte
It took me about an hour to read the convenient chapter summaries of this book, and then I was hooked!
Karen Russell
This book is very well researched and very well written.
Kirk Luckscheiter

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

130 of 138 people found the following review helpful By Guy Denutte on May 31, 2009
Format: Paperback
This is the most important economic textbook since Marx wrote Das Capital. Whereas Marx goes great lengths explaining all the problems concerning the *production cycles* of capitalism, Griffin explains the *money supply* side. And this ends up being even more disturbing. Griffin explains that money is created "out of nothing", worse even, out of "less than nothing", out of DEBT. Whenever the government is in need of money, they "lend" it to the Federal Reserve, which, by the way, isn't a government institution, but a cartel of private banks, invented by the Rockefeller and Morgan families in Jekyll Island in 1910 and established by Congress in 1913. This Fed "creates" the money the government needs in the form of government bonds, ultimately made out of "paper and ink". Government then spends this money (payment to contractors etc.) and this money ends up as deposits in private bank accounts, where it is used in turn to back up private loans. More money is created "out of nothing", since banks typically lend 9 dollars for each dollar they have in deposit ! As you can see, all money is created out of debt. Would all debts be paid, all money would literally... disappear... Money which is not backed up by gold is thus an illusion.

Now, governments do all what is in their power to be indebted. Remember Bush and Obama rescued "Banks Too Big To Fail" (sic) and other Big Corporations, each time with more than 700 billion USD, without even raising taxes ! They even did better ! They lowered taxes at the same time ! Ever wondered how they perform this fascinating trick? Read this important book. Griffin shows that recollecting taxes isn't really necessary. But we DO end up paying those bills, every time government decides to "create money out of nothing". Don't be mistaken.
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52 of 53 people found the following review helpful By Prof. CJ on July 15, 2009
Format: Paperback
What exactly is the Federal Reserve (or "Fed," for short), and what exactly does it do? Where does our money come from? What do banks actually do? Very few Americans - including (perhaps especially) our puppet political leaders - can accurately answer these questions. G. Edward Griffin skillfully gives you all the shocking answers in this book.

Griffin writes very well and manages to make subjects as supposedly arcane as money and banking into things that any literate layman can understand. Besides the complete history of the Fed, Griffin also provides some general history of banking and money which puts it all in context. As a historian, I can tell you that his facts are mostly spot-on, as are his economic analyses. Griffin cites the sources and quotes people to back up most of his claims. Furthermore, to his credit, on the few occasions in the book when he does speculate or theorize, Griffin makes it clear that he is speculating or theorizing - unlike many other authors.

This is not just dry history, though - Griffin clearly has a point of view, and it's decidedly anti-Fed. Here are his reasons for wanting to abolish the Federal Reserve:
1. It is incapable of accomplishing its stated objectives (which are basically moderating the business cycle and maintaining a stable dollar - it has clearly failed on both counts.)
2. It is a cartel operating against the public interest.
3. It is the supreme instrument of usury.
4. It encourages our most unfair tax (ie, inflation.)
5. It encourages war.
6. It destabilizes the economy.
7. It is an instrument of totalitarianism.

The things that are happening in our economy and government today may not seem to make much sense - until you read this book.
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34 of 35 people found the following review helpful By K. R. Mudgeon on May 7, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This should open the eyes of anyone who believes the government can, or even has any interest in the economic well being of ordinary people. It makes clear how the secretly formed cabal between the federal government, the nation's major banks, and the stealthy formed and secretive Federal Reserve continuously defraud American citizens. Anyone who wonders why Thomas Jefferson feared the power of banking institutions and why Andrew Jackson fought and killed the Bank of the United States will find the answer in this expose of the Fed, which is nothing more than a successor central bank to its evil predecessor. That bank existed, as does the Fed, to channel the nation's power and wealth to a permanent oligarchy to which common people always are subject irrespective of the fact that -- because of the success of the ongoing subterfuge -- most are not aware of, and do not recognize their subservience. The book does contain some factual errors, most of which are technical in nature, but they are minor and do not detract from the book's value as an eye opening expose of commonly accepted economic and financial myths.
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29 of 30 people found the following review helpful By Douglas W. Hagen on May 8, 2009
Format: Paperback
I have read several books on the problems that our economy and monetary system is going through today. This book takes you through the history of money and politics behind the Federal Reserve and The World Bank. If you want to understand how we got into this mess and how we should get out of it, this book is for you. A word of warning, it is going to scare you. The Creature is very engrained in our system and it is not going to be easy to get it out, if at all.
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