Qty:1
  • List Price: $39.99
  • Save: $6.63 (17%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
The Crisis of Imprisonmen... has been added to your Cart
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Good | Details
Sold by nettextstore
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Books have varying amounts of wear and highlighting. Usually ships within 24 hours in quality packaging. Satisfaction guaranteed. Books have varying amounts of wear, highlighting and may not include CD. Usually ships within 2 business days in quality packaging. Satisfaction guaranteed. This item may not include any CDs, Infotracs, Access cards or other supplementary material. May also not indude dust jacket. Satisfaction guaranteed! Before leaving negitive feedback please contact us.
Access codes and supplements are not guaranteed with used items.
Sell yours for a Gift Card
We'll buy it for $7.87
Learn More
Trade in now
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Crisis of Imprisonment: Protest, Politics, and the Making of the American Penal State, 1776-1941 (Cambridge Historical Studies in American Law and Society) Paperback – March 4, 2008

ISBN-13: 978-0521537834 ISBN-10: 0521537835

Buy New
Price: $33.36
25 New from $20.98 19 Used from $16.85
Rent from Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
$7.95
Paperback
"Please retry"
$33.36
$20.98 $16.85
Free Two-Day Shipping for College Students with Amazon Student Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


The Amazon Book Review
The Amazon Book Review
Introducing The Amazon Book Review, our editors' fresh new blog featuring interviews with authors, book reviews, quirky essays on book trends, and regular columns by our editors. Explore now

Frequently Bought Together

The Crisis of Imprisonment: Protest, Politics, and the Making of the American Penal State, 1776-1941 (Cambridge Historical Studies in American Law and Society) + The Condemnation of Blackness: Race, Crime, and the Making of Modern Urban America
Price for both: $44.30

Buy the selected items together
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE
Hero Quick Promo
Save up to 90% on Textbooks
Rent textbooks, buy textbooks, or get up to 80% back when you sell us your books. Shop Now

Product Details


Editorial Reviews

Review

"Deeply researched and deeply reflective, The Crisis of Imprisonment redefines the central themes of 19th and early 20th century American prison history. Its story of the rise and fall of contractual penal servitude shows how questions of imprisonment, prison labor, and the treatment of prisoners lay at the heart of ongoing struggles over the meaning of freedom and unfreedom in America. Few scholars have succeeded so well in tracing the reciprocal relations between the institutions of punishment and the broader fields of economic and political power with which they are connected. Written with clarity and conviction, this is a major new work on the formation of the American penal state." - David Garland, New York University

"Although there have been several fine studies of the thinking and influence of American prison reformers, McLennan has written a revealing study of the impact of popular politics, and especially of the prisoners themselves on the shaping and reshaping of state prison systems. She helps us understand the huge prison business of our times by analyzing controversies and prison revolts that led first to the development of contract prison labor then to its abolition in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries." - David Montgomery, Yale University

"A timely, penetrating look into the horrors of the nineteenth-century prison system, its brutal-and brutalizing-convict labor system, and the mass of ordinary Americans who confronted its abuses and, ultimately, brought about its abolition." - Sister Helen Prejean, author of Dead Man Walking and The Death of Innocents

"This is an extraordinary investigation and analysis of penal servitude and anti-prison labor campaigns in American history. Wonderfully insightful and illuminating, this work has much to teach us about where we've been and what we must consider in confronting the politics of legal punishment." - Bryan Stevenson, New York University School of Law, Executive Director, Equal Justice Initiative

"One of the smartest books about punishment I have ever read. And this is not just a book about prisons. The story Rebecca McLennan narrates so powerfully in these pages-the controversial career of penal servitude in a liberal democratic republic--has much to tell us about the history of American society, politics, and institutions." - Michael Willrich, Brandeis University, author of City of Courts: Socializing Justice in Progressive Era Chicago

"In a nation dedicated to liberty, the topic of the imprisoned deserves attention and the considerate analysis exhibited in this book. Essential." -Choice

Book Description

America's prison-based system of punishment has not always enjoyed the widespread political and moral legitimacy it has today. Unearthing fresh evidence from prison and state archives, McLennan shows how, in each of three distinct periods of crisis, widespread dissent culminated in the dismantling of old systems of imprisonment.

Customer Reviews

There are no customer reviews yet.
5 star
4 star
3 star
2 star
1 star
Share your thoughts with other customers

More About the Author

Rebecca McLennan is associate professor of history at the University of California, Berkeley. Her research focuses on America since 1607, with an emphasis on post-revolutionary U.S. legal, political, and cultural history. She received her PhD from Columbia University and was on the faculty of Harvard University before joining Berkeley's history department. She has taught a diverse range of undergraduate courses, including classes on American and global foodways and agriculture since 1491; modern consumer culture; land, law, and property; and crime and punishment from colonial times to the present. Rebecca has published widely in American history and is currently writing a cultural history of courts in the early republic. Her most recent book, The Crisis of Imprisonment: Protest, Politics, and the Making of the American Penal State, 1776-1941 (Cambridge University Press, 2008), won several major book awards, including the American Historical Association's Littleton-Griswold Prize for best book in U.S. legal history.

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?