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The Crows of Pearblossom Hardcover – January 1, 1969


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Hardcover, January 1, 1969
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 40 pages
  • Publisher: Random House; 2nd edition (1969)
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B000O9YJAE
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (45 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,454,581 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Aldous Huxley (1894-1963) is the author of the classic novels Island, Eyeless in Gaza, and The Genius and the Goddess, as well as such critically acclaimed nonfiction works as The Devils of Loudun, The Doors of Perception, and The Perennial Philosophy. Born in Surrey, England, and educated at Oxford, he died in Los Angeles.

Customer Reviews

She just likes the characters in the story.
Old Man Owl
Most of the time he sleeps, but every afternoon at half past three, when Mrs. Crow is away doing her shopping, he climbs up the tree and eat her egg.
Wayne S. Walker
Children and adults both will enjoy or even love this book.
Johnny Mac

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

39 of 40 people found the following review helpful By S. B Lauderdale on May 24, 2001
Format: Hardcover
Since my earliest memories (app. ages 3 and 4) I have loved and treasured this book. Even before I could read, the animal characters within were well-beloved friends of mine, simply through the pictures. I was thrilled when my parents would read it to me, and when I learned to read myself I was proud to be able to get through it on my own. It was only much later, when I actually knew who Huxley was and realized he was the author of one of my favorite early childhood books, that I learned to love it for its historic context as well.
This book comes from an interesting background. Others have already commented on the time period Huxley wrote it in--during the second World War. It is his only children's book and he wrote it not for publication but for Olivia, the young daughter of his nextdoor neighbors (human characters who are actually referred to by name in the course of the book, further personalizing this effort of Huxley's.) There were only two copies, Huxley's and the one belonging to these neighbors. The first was destroyed in a fire that broke out in the Huxley home. The second was published following his death.
While I recognize the problem a previous reader had with this book, I must respectfully disagree. That "The Crows of Pearblossom" has a certain morbidity is in fact partly the point. Looking back on most successful children's stories, we see that they often have elements of the violent or morbid, since the first time the Big Bad Wolf ate Little Red Riding Hood and beyond. That children be acquainted by these means with some of the more unpleasant aspects of life is important.
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Old Man Owl on January 7, 2002
Format: Library Binding
This is my three year old daughter's favorite book. She doesn't know that it was supposedly written as a allegory to World War II. She just likes the characters in the story. My wife and I get a kick out of it because it is just like life. "Why don't you go down into the snake's hole and kill him" (That's my job!) But I reply, "Somehow I don't think that's a good idea," and so the story goes.
Jordan likes this book so I'm not going to write in a lot of psycho-babble. Maybe she sees a problem within a family that has to be solved. And it is! Maybe she sees a threat to a family that the parents must solve. And they do! Perhaps she just doesn't like snakes and feels he got what he deserves. If you have this book, it is a classic in the true sense of the word, to be treasured.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Kent Duryee on February 27, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Quite apart from the dire, apocalyptic tone of Brave New World, Mr. and Mrs. Crow live in an idyllic world on the Mojave Desert of Southern California. Their domestic problem is an allegory for many of the problems we face in the adult world. I grew up in a small town just west of Pearblossom. When I was 8 or 9, a copy of the book was given to me by a close relative of Olivia's who still lived in Pearblossom. I will always thank Rose de Haulleville for giving me my first exposure to Huxley's writing. Of course it was many more years before I appreciated books like Brave New World or Antic Hay, however I have always remembered the crows in their nest in Pearblossom as my own form of non-pharmaceutical soma ;-)
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 10, 1998
Format: Hardcover
Mr. and Mrs. Crow are having difficulty raising a family as their neighbor, the rattlesnake, keeps stealing every egg Mrs. Crow lays. How Mr. Crow and his friend, Mr. Owl, solve the problem will delight any child. The story, written by a classic author best known for his science fiction/political commentary, is reminiscent of a fable in the tradition of Aesop. It is simply and elegantly written for children in the 6 to 9 age group. It lends itself beautifully to reading aloud to a child.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 2, 1999
Format: Hardcover
i acquired this book as a child and my father read it to me and my brother over and over again. now my brother has a child and i have given this beautiful story book to him. this is the only childrens book aldous huxley ever wrote and he wrote it for a child, i believe her name was olivia, that he cared for very deeply, not having children of his own. it is a story of love, family and the trials and tribulations of life. how to conquer evil with good. i recieved this book through weelky reader as a child, too bad more children don't have that opportunity today.
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11 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Virgina Colson on March 11, 2013
Format: Hardcover
I bought this for my daughter and she loves it--the illustrations are *beautiful*--but unfortunately I have to heavily edit the reading of it. I'm kind of stunned that whoever published it didn't notice or care how sexist the story is. It's also morbid and a little scary, as other reviewers have noted, but that seems more like a personal choice for each family than something that just shouldn't have seen the light of day. The Mrs. Crow character is a stereotypical nagging, foolish woman from another time, not suited to modern readers. In addition to the language that the other reviewers have noted about Mr. Crow telling Mrs. Crow to "shut your beak" and that her ideas are never good, he also accuses her of overeating, and in another spot tells her "you talk too much. Keep your beak shut and get out of your nest." And then in the last frame when the snake is finally subdued, she gives him "a very long lecture."

Abrams and Sophie Blackall should be ashamed of themselves cashing in on Huxley's name to put out a story that, while charming, is just not OK to read to kids anymore.
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