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The Crows of Pearblossom Hardcover – Bargain Price, March 1, 2011


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Hardcover, Bargain Price, March 1, 2011
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$49.00

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Product Details

  • Age Range: 4 - 8 years
  • Grade Level: Preschool - 3
  • Hardcover: 40 pages
  • Publisher: Harry N. Abrams; Reprint edition (March 1, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0810997304
  • ASIN: B005FOELGA
  • Product Dimensions: 10.8 x 0.5 x 10.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (51 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,191,465 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

A rather charming children s book. The story is clever, wittily told and bristles with spiky humor and it could quite possibly become a new favorite among schoolchildren. ...Huxley s standing as one of the grandfathers of dystopian Y.A. is already established. Perhaps the next generation will think of him as that guy who wrote about crows eggs. --New York Times ARTSBEAT blog

Huxley s story starts good and grim just the thing to hold a young audience --Kirkus Reviews --This text refers to an alternate Hardcover edition.

About the Author

Aldous Huxley (1894-1963), the author of Brave New World, lived the latter part of his life near the Mojave Desert, where this story is set. Sophie Blackall is the illustrator of many children's books, including the Ivy and Bean series. She lives in Brooklyn. Visit her at www.sophieblackall.com.

Customer Reviews

She just likes the characters in the story.
Old Man Owl
A fun and witty read for both children and adults, this Aldous Huxley's only Children's Book is a great one to add to your library.
Joey S.
The story is creative and the illustrations are delightful.
Johnny Mac

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

41 of 42 people found the following review helpful By S. B Lauderdale on May 24, 2001
Format: Hardcover
Since my earliest memories (app. ages 3 and 4) I have loved and treasured this book. Even before I could read, the animal characters within were well-beloved friends of mine, simply through the pictures. I was thrilled when my parents would read it to me, and when I learned to read myself I was proud to be able to get through it on my own. It was only much later, when I actually knew who Huxley was and realized he was the author of one of my favorite early childhood books, that I learned to love it for its historic context as well.
This book comes from an interesting background. Others have already commented on the time period Huxley wrote it in--during the second World War. It is his only children's book and he wrote it not for publication but for Olivia, the young daughter of his nextdoor neighbors (human characters who are actually referred to by name in the course of the book, further personalizing this effort of Huxley's.) There were only two copies, Huxley's and the one belonging to these neighbors. The first was destroyed in a fire that broke out in the Huxley home. The second was published following his death.
While I recognize the problem a previous reader had with this book, I must respectfully disagree. That "The Crows of Pearblossom" has a certain morbidity is in fact partly the point. Looking back on most successful children's stories, we see that they often have elements of the violent or morbid, since the first time the Big Bad Wolf ate Little Red Riding Hood and beyond. That children be acquainted by these means with some of the more unpleasant aspects of life is important.
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Old Man Owl on January 7, 2002
Format: Library Binding
This is my three year old daughter's favorite book. She doesn't know that it was supposedly written as a allegory to World War II. She just likes the characters in the story. My wife and I get a kick out of it because it is just like life. "Why don't you go down into the snake's hole and kill him" (That's my job!) But I reply, "Somehow I don't think that's a good idea," and so the story goes.
Jordan likes this book so I'm not going to write in a lot of psycho-babble. Maybe she sees a problem within a family that has to be solved. And it is! Maybe she sees a threat to a family that the parents must solve. And they do! Perhaps she just doesn't like snakes and feels he got what he deserves. If you have this book, it is a classic in the true sense of the word, to be treasured.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Kent Duryee on February 27, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Quite apart from the dire, apocalyptic tone of Brave New World, Mr. and Mrs. Crow live in an idyllic world on the Mojave Desert of Southern California. Their domestic problem is an allegory for many of the problems we face in the adult world. I grew up in a small town just west of Pearblossom. When I was 8 or 9, a copy of the book was given to me by a close relative of Olivia's who still lived in Pearblossom. I will always thank Rose de Haulleville for giving me my first exposure to Huxley's writing. Of course it was many more years before I appreciated books like Brave New World or Antic Hay, however I have always remembered the crows in their nest in Pearblossom as my own form of non-pharmaceutical soma ;-)
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 10, 1998
Format: Hardcover
Mr. and Mrs. Crow are having difficulty raising a family as their neighbor, the rattlesnake, keeps stealing every egg Mrs. Crow lays. How Mr. Crow and his friend, Mr. Owl, solve the problem will delight any child. The story, written by a classic author best known for his science fiction/political commentary, is reminiscent of a fable in the tradition of Aesop. It is simply and elegantly written for children in the 6 to 9 age group. It lends itself beautifully to reading aloud to a child.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By L. B. Taylor on August 28, 2011
Format: Hardcover
This is such an odd review. I have before me a children's book that I enjoy for the pictures but I can't recommend it for young kids. My version of THE CROWS OF PEARBLOSSOM is the 1967 copyright hardback with Barbara Cooney as the illustrator. The pictures are done in shades of black, white, gray and green. They are pleasant to look at. I would recommend this older version to any mixed media artists who need motivation with nature.

THE CROWS OF PEARBLOSSOM is the only children's story ever written by Aldous Huxley, the famous English novelist, essayist and critic. He wrote it for his five-year-old niece, Olivia, during a Christmas holiday in 1944. Her brother Siggy is mentioned in the story, too. In some ways the story reminds me of a fable from long ago. The story is meant to teach you a lesson. As an adult I can appreciate his writing but IMHO he is not a children's author. There is a reason he did not write other stories for children.

The mother crow's eggs have been eaten daily by a snake for a long time. When she approaches her husband about the situation and insinuates that he may be scared of going up against the snake he responds "your ideas are seldom good...I shall go and talk to my friend Owl....his ideas are always good." When Mr. Crow and Owl return to the upset Mrs. Crow the husband responds, "you talk too much. Keep your beak shut and get out of your nest". Somehow I just don't think this is something I would want young children to read. Mrs. Crow comes across as whiney and stupid. Owl is the brains and yet he and Mr. Crow are not mentioned after the fake eggs are put in the nest. There is nothing written to show children that the Owl and Mr. and Mrs. Crow can have a HEA. I know, I know, I am putting too much thought into this but there are so many better books out there for children to read. If you are looking for good childrens' entertainment try something else.
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More About the Author

Aldous Huxley (1894-1963) is the author of the classic novels Island, Eyeless in Gaza, and The Genius and the Goddess, as well as such critically acclaimed nonfiction works as The Devils of Loudun, The Doors of Perception, and The Perennial Philosophy. Born in Surrey, England, and educated at Oxford, he died in Los Angeles.

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