Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Color:
Image not available

To view this video download Flash Player

 


or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering
More Buying Choices
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Tell the Publisher!
I'd like to read this book on Kindle

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

The Cultural Study of Law: Reconstructing Legal Scholarship [Hardcover]

Paul W. Kahn
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)

List Price: $43.00
Price: $40.85 & FREE Shipping. Details
You Save: $2.15 (5%)
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
Temporarily out of stock.
Order now and we'll deliver when available. We'll e-mail you with an estimated delivery date as soon as we have more information. Your account will only be charged when we ship the item.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
Free Two-Day Shipping for College Students with Amazon Student

Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover $40.85  
Paperback $26.72  
Image
Teacher Supplies
Browse our Teacher Supplies store, with everything teachers need to educate students and expand their learning.

Book Description

May 15, 1999 0226422542 978-0226422541 1
Belief in the rule of law characterizes our society, our political order, and even our identity as citizens. The Cultural Study of Law is the first full examination of what it means to conduct a modern intellectual inquiry into the culture of law. Paul Kahn outlines the tools necessary for such an inquiry by analyzing the concepts of time, space, citizen, judge, sovereignty, and theory within the culture of law's rule. Charting the way for the development of a new intellectual discipline, Paul Kahn advocates an approach that stands outside law's normative framework and looks at law as a way of life rather than as a set of rules.

"Professor Kahn's perspective is neat and alluring: We need a form of legal scholarship released from the project of reform so that we can better understand who and what we are. The new discipline should study 'not legal rules, but the imagination as it constructs a world of legal meaning.' . . . [C]oncise, good reading, and recommended." —New York Law Journal


Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

Legal scholarship, Yale Law School professor Kahn argues, has no real theory of the rule of law because it takes the rule of law as a given and then proposes some sort of reform. Kahn argues that "the culture of law's rule needs to be studied in the same way as other cultures"; this book suggests how this can be done. In an approach blending Socratic dialogue and cultural anthropology, Kahn suggests a suspension of disbelief to permit study of how the notion of the rule of law structures other beliefs: about time and space, about the self, about free choice, about subject and object. "Standing within the law," he urges, "we are always in danger of allowing law to fill our entire vision." By stepping outside the "givens" of the law, readers may better understand the unspoken values on which the rule of law rests. Appropriate for larger social science collections where theoretical works circulate. Mary Carroll

From the Inside Flap

Belief in the rule of law characterizes our society, our political order, and even our identity as citizens. The Cultural Study of Law is the first full examination of what it means to conduct a modern intellectual inquiry into the culture of law. Paul Kahn outlines the tools necessary for such an inquiry by analyzing the concepts of time, space, citizen, judge, sovereignty, and theory within the culture of law's rule. Charting the way for the development of a new intellectual discipline, Paul Kahn advocates an approach that stands outside law's normative framework and looks at law as a way of life rather than as a set of rules.
--This text refers to the Paperback edition.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 180 pages
  • Publisher: University Of Chicago Press; 1 edition (May 15, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0226422542
  • ISBN-13: 978-0226422541
  • Product Dimensions: 9.4 x 6.3 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.1 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,883,569 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
(1)
5.0 out of 5 stars
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
Share your thoughts with other customers
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
Professor Kahn's book is a deeply radical critique of American legal scholarship, in the sense of "getting to the roots," as opposed to a position on a political spectrum. He argues, essentially, that most legal scholarship is analogous to theology, where the rule of law substitutes for the existence or appearance of God. The various schools of thought within legal scholarship, from "originalists" to critical legal studies, all assume that the rule of law exists, or is at least possible, and debate its nature, or how the rule of law may be best realized (what Kahn calls debating proposals for legal reform). Kahn asserts that "[w]e cannot study law if we are already committed to law" (p. 27) and proposes that legal scholars examine the law outside of the forms of discourse that constitute, or attempt to make immanent, the rule of law itself. Kahn proposes a number of approaches to study how legal meaning (the rule of law) is created as cultural artifact, and the implications of those meanings for conceptions of the state and the individual.

In the end, Kahn leaves the most deeply radical implications of his work more implicit than explicit. What happens when we are no longer "committed to law?" Could we lose our commitment to law in one context (as a student of law as a cultural practice), yet maintain in another (as a citizen)? Kahn suggests that nothing in his book would require the "abandonment of the legal scholar's traditional concerns with reform" (p. 137), but this understates the profound implications of his work. It is literally true that nothing in Kahn's book "requires" the abandonment of projects of legal reform or faith in the law.
Read more ›
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Search Customer Reviews
Search these reviews only




What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Sell a Digital Version of This Book in the Kindle Store

If you are a publisher or author and hold the digital rights to a book, you can sell a digital version of it in our Kindle Store. Learn more

Forums

There are no discussions about this product yet.
Be the first to discuss this product with the community.
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 



Look for Similar Items by Category